Holyoke High School Course Selection Guide

Program of Studies

 

This section lists all credited courses offered by all departments at Holyoke High School. The availability of each course is contingent upon enrollment. Each entry has a short description of the course content as well as information on assigned credits, course duration, course weights, and prerequisites.   Students should familiarize themselves with the course offerings before scheduling a meeting with their guidance counselor.

 

Explanation of Abbreviations

 

hr –     represents the number of periods that a course meets during one week..  A 2.5 hr course meets every other day.

 

wk–      represents the number of weeks a course is scheduled.

 

cr –      represents the number of credits assigned to a course. All graded courses receive credit.

Assignment of credits is based on one rule:  one credit is assigned for one classroom hour per week over the entire school year of 40 weeks.  Multiples or fractions of credits are assigned based on the number of weekly meetings or terms a course covers.

 

wt –     represents the academic weight assigned to a course.  Holyoke High School recognizes that all courses have intrinsic value, but to provide for the wide diversity of student interests and abilities, and to encourage students to select more challenging offerings, the following weights have been adopted:

 

  • Advanced wt  is  assigned  to  courses  that  demand  achievement  equivalent  to comparable college courses or at a significantly more demanding pace and depth.
  • Standard wt is assigned to courses that require achievement appropriate to a quality high school.

 

Prerequisites are to be viewed as firm guidelines for registration in any course.  A student may submit a written request that prerequisites for a specific course or courses be waived.  The written request must detail reasons for the waiver of any prerequisites.  Such cases will be reviewed by the appropriate Department Head(s) and the Principal.  A proficiency test may be required.

 

BUSINESS AND EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT

 

The Holyoke High School Business and Educational Technology Department offers instruction in business practices to students who plan to further their business studies at the post secondary level as well as to students who intend to enter the workplace upon graduation. Students may freely select from any of these courses to suit their needs or abilities. Questions regarding prerequisites should be referred to the Department Chair.    Course enrollment is limited by availability of computers.

 

623      Microsoft Office Suite                             5hr           20wk          2.5cr        Standard wt This is an introductory course designed to provide an overview of keyboarding and Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint.  The technology skills gained can be applied to work in other business courses and/or transferred into other curricular areas, including mathematics, English, science, social studies and foreign languages.  This course is a prerequisite for most business courses.  This course is highly recommended for Freshmen and incoming students.  HCC articulation agreement – 1 college credit

 

610      Accounting I                                              5hr            40wk         5cr             Standard wt Accounting is known as the language of business. Through hands-on applications and the integration of computer technology, using an online Accounting software program students will learn the basic fundamentals of accounting. Students will develop a solid foundation in small business record keeping, while being prepared for future entry-level accounting positions. This entry level course is designed to provide the career oriented business student with a background in concepts of double entry bookkeeping with an emphasis on the understanding of accounting principles. This class is a must for college bound students who plan on majoring in Business

PREREQUISITE:  A grade of ‘C’ or better in Math.

 

310      Accounting II Honors                               5hr            40wk         5cr                  Honor wt This course  reinforces fundamental Accounting I principles and extends them to more complex  accounting practices. Competency-based goals, tasks, and simulations help prepare students for entry-level accounting positions or for further study in accounting. PREREQUISITE:   A  grade  of  ‘C’  or  better  in  Accounting  I 610  or  Accounting Intensive 612.

 

612      Accounting Intensive                               5hr           20wk          2.5cr        Standard wt This  accounting  course  offers  an  accelerated  approach  to  all  students  interested  in learning about the accounting cycle.  Automated Accounting software enables students to learn how computers are used for business record-keeping and accounting needs. Accounting software offers integration with other application such as spreadsheets and word processors.  Emphasis will be placed upon the theory and purpose of accounting. Students will become competent using all books of financial record.  Formatting and interpreting financial reports for service and merchandising business will be stressed. This course is a “must” for all students planning a major in the many fields of business and economics at the college level.

PREREQUISITE:  A grade of ‘C’ or better in Math.

 

625      Sport Management                                  5 hr          20wk          2.5cr        Standard wt This course provides students with exposure to the spectrum of skills associated with working in the Sport Industry.  Students will be involved in decision making problem solving and comparative analysis activities.  Students will also have the opportunity to research current jobs in the sports field and explore educational pathways at the collegiate level.  History of sport, consumer behavior, sport law, sport marketing and sponsorship are only a few of the topics covered in class.

PREREQUISITE:  Microsoft Office Suite 624.

 

631      Sport Management II                              5 hr          20wk          2.5cr        Standard wt This course will build on curriculum learned in Sport Management 1: decision making, marketing,   sport   law,   finance   and   sponsorship.   Students   will   apply   theoretical foundations learned in Sports Management 1 to run their own football franchise in the virtual Sport Game Simulation (computer software). Students will also have an opportunity for hands-on involvement in planning, promotion, and staging of special events in sport oriented settings

PREREQUISITE:    625  Sport  Management,  a  “C”  average  or  better,  instructor  approval

required.

 

629      Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS) 5hr         20wk          2.5cr         Standard wt This prep course provides a framework for end-user proficiency with Microsoft Office Suite applications.    An opportunity is provided to master the four components of the suite:  Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint and Microsoft Access. PREREQUISITE:  Microsoft Office Suite 624 with a ‘C’ or better.  HCC articulation agreement – 4 college credits for 625 & 629

 

636      Money and Banking I                              5hr            20wk          2.5cr         Standard wt Become a financially responsible individual!  Students will analyze their current financial status and design future financial goals.   Learn about credit and how not to jeopardize your  future.    The  course  will  highlight  reasons  behind  good  decision  making  and investment planning as well as various investment choices.  Participation in Stock Market competitions will give students an opportunity to manage various stock portfolios. PREREQUISITE: Microsoft Office Suite 624

 

637      Web Page Design I                                   5hr           20wk          2.5cr        Standard wt Students will explore current web sites and learn the critical components for effective web site designs.  Using Hypertext Markup Language (html), students will design and compose several project web sites.  They will also learn how to design web sites using Dreamweaver software.  HCC articulation agreement – 3 college credits

 

635      Web Page Design II                                  5hr            20wk          2.5cr         Standard wt Students will design and create web page elements using Adobe Flash. Using Flash, students will be able to create buttons, objects, characters and creatures and then program them to follow behaviors using the Action Script programing language. Students will then assemble these elements and create web pages using Adobe Dreamweaver. Students will also learn cartooning and game design.

PREREQUISITE: Grade of ‘C” or better in 637 Web Page I

 

645      Adobe Photoshop                                     5hr           20wk          2.5cr        Standard wt Adobe Photoshop is a hands-on introductory course that will introduce the student to the basics of Photoshop.  Adobe Photoshop is a professional image-editing program used to create  original  artwork,  manipulate  color  images,  and  retouch  photographs  for  page layout, multimedia, and the Web.  In this course, students will learn many of the basic skills that will allow them to take advantage of Photoshop’s powerful tools.

 

646      Adobe Illustrator                                     5hr           20wk          2.5cr       Standard wt Adobe Illustrator is a hands-on introductory course that will introduce the student to the basics of Illustrator.   Adobe Illustrator is a professional illustration software program used to create graphics and type effects for page layout, multimedia, and the web.  In this course, students will learn many of the basic skills that will allow them to take advantage of Illustrator’s powerful tools.

 

706      Publication Production                             5hr         40wk          5cr           Standard wt Utilizing available technology and community resources, students enrolled in this course will expand their technology and graphic arts knowledge by producing publications for the school.  This hands-on business experience will guide the student from initial sale to final product.

PREREQUISITE: Application and recommendation of advisor.

 

609      Microsoft Publisher              5hr                  20wk               2.5cr                Standard wt Microsoft Publisher is a hands-on introductory course that will introduce you to the basics of Publisher 2010.  Microsoft Publisher helps you create, personalize, and share a wide range of professional-quality publications and marketing materials with ease.  In this course, you will learn to create brochures, newsletters, postcards, greeting cards, as well as e-mail newsletters that you can deliver with high-quality results without having graphic design experience.

 

606      Business Communications                5hr                     20wk                        2.5cr    Standard wt This course provides an overview of the wide range of communication skills used by business personnel to present ideas clearly, logically and persuasively.  It emphasizes communication techniques that lead to sound decision making and effective teamwork.  Instruction is geared to improving students’ abilities to analyze, research, organize, write, listen, and speak while using a variety of business and graphics software applications effectively.

 

608      Marketing Management                   5hr                  20wk                           2.5cr    Standard wt This course offers a concentrated overview of general business principles.  Topics include: economics, marketing, management, and business ethics from both domestic and international perspectives.  Students gain an understanding of successful problem solving and decision making strategies involved in operating a business in a global economy.

 

743      Video Production                                      5hr            20wk                        2.5cr      Standard wt Provides a hands-on introduction to producing videos and broadcast television.  The class will focus on four basic components; proper handling and operation of a video camera, recording audio with a variety of microphones, the important role of lighting, and the use of technology through editing software for students to deliver finished video to a viewing audience.  Students will complete programs working alone, or in teams similar to a broadcast studio crew.  Subjects will range from arts and theatre, documentary and news, to sports and commercials.  Note: Students will be required to sign a contract of responsibility for equipment use.

 

744      Video Journalism                                            5hr      40wk       5cr        Standard wt

Video Journalism is a year-long course that works as the visual branch of Holyoke High’s news publication, The Herald. Throughout the course, students will develop video production and digital communication skills in an environment similar to that of a television newsroom. The work done

in the course will culminate into a weekly web news show that is produced by students from both Video Journalism and Mr. Courchesne’s Media class. Note: Students will be required to sign a contract of responsibility for equipment use.

 

605     Exploring Computer Science                   5hr            40wk                        5cr       Standard wt Exploring Computer Science is designed to introduce students to the field of computer science through an exploration of engaging and accessible topics. Students explore subjects such as; how does a computer work, do online personas affect our behaviors and how are cyber-crimes committed? We will also explore a variety of programming languages, solve computing challenges in teams, build spites, create and paint 3D models and build video games.   Rather than focusing

the entire course on learning particular software tools or programming languages, the course is designed to focus on the conceptual ideas of computing and help students understand why certain tools or languages might be utilized to solve particular problems.

 

745      Documentary Film                                   5hr            20wk                         2.5cr       Standard wt A look at the history, development, and impact of documentary film. Students will view and study the social, political, and cultural implications of various films, as well as the documentary filmmaking process as a whole. The course will look at the various forms that documentaries can take: as forms of art, journalism, advocacy, and personal expression.

Prerequisite: Juniors and seniors only

 

604      Mobile Computer Science Principles      5 hr           40wk                         5cr          Honors wt This course provides an introduction to basic principles of computer science (CS), including programming in App Inventor, a graphical programming language for Android mobile devices. This is a projects-based course. Students will learn CS principles by building socially useful mobile apps and reflecting on the impacts of their work. This course involves a strong writing component. Students will maintain a portfolio of their work, which will include several performance tasks in the areas of programming, data analysis, and the impact of computing technology.

Prerequisite: Student must have passed Algebra I. Preference given to Juniors and Seniors.

 

CAREER EXPLORATIONS

 

 

690        Career Explorations                                    5hr        20wk            5cr               Standard wt All students enrolled in the 9th grade academy at Holyoke High School have the opportunity to elect Career Explorations as a course either first or second semester.  During this 20 week course students have the opportunity to explore 13 career technical programs offered at Wm. J. Dean Technical High School.  These students will explore each of the programs for one day, at the conclusion of the one day experience, the students will examine four of their top programs of interest.  Ongoing career development is critical to every student during the time spent in their top four programs and every student will have to narrow their career technical program to two choices before the end of the term.  The students will begin their individual career plans and goal setting standards as they assess each program.

Final shop selection for grade 10 is based on shop performance, grades, attendance, and behavior. Upon selection, students will be responsible for working closely with their parents, guidance counselors, administration and teachers to assure that their choices aligns with their career plans and goals.

 

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

 

The English program addresses the traditional elements of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and reasoning.  It develops understandings and applications in the language arts and in composition and communication, and exposes students to quality literature and consequently involves them with issues of the human condition.

Students are assigned to one of four levels of academic intensity including AP on the basis of their demonstrated achievement reflected in standardized test results, English grades, and teacher recommendations.

Advanced English students should self-select the level, score in the top 20% of their class on standardized tests rank in the top 25% of their class, have earned an English grade of A or B at the Standard level (A, B, or C at the Advanced level), and be recommended by their current English teacher.

 

109      English I Honors                                     5hr        40wk            5cr               Honor wt

The course is designed to foster understandings and applications in the language arts and in composition and communication, and to familiarize students with a variety of literature and its components. They will be expected to undertake outside reading and projects that include library and literary research. Summer assignments are mandatory.

 

113      English I                                                 5hr        40wk            5cr          Standard wt

The course is designed to foster understandings and applications in the language arts and in composition and communication, and to familiarize students with a variety of literature and its components. Independent reading is required.

 

111      English I Ethnic Studies                         5hr        40wk            5cr          Standard wt This course is a 9th grade English class where students earn the required English credits towards graduation. In this course students will learn to “read the word and the world” by engaging with various types of texts, analyzing systems of oppression, and ways of resistance. Like all Ethnic Studies classes, students will hone their Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening skills. Students in this course are also enrolled in the 9th grade Ethnic Studies (Social Studies) class.

 

112     English I Ethnic Studies Honors             5hr        40wk            5cr          Honors wt

This course is a 9th grade English class where students earn the required English credits towards graduation. In this course students will learn to “read the word and the world” by engaging with various types of texts, analyzing systems of oppression, and ways of resistance. Like all Ethnic Studies classes, students will hone their Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening skills. Honors students will be expected to engage in outside reading, assignments, and projects that include library and literary research. Students in this course are also enrolled in the Honors 9th grade US History Ethnic Studies class. PREREQUISITE:  Student must be recommended by their 8th grade English teacher.

 

120      English II Honors                            5hr        40wk            5cr             Honors wt Advanced sophomore English students are expected to meet the requirements of an intensive, comprehensive program of grammar, literature, vocabulary and composition.  They will be expected to undertake outside reading and projects that include library and literary research.

PREREQUISITE:  Successful completion of English 1 113 or English I Honors 109 and recommendation from the English I teacher. Summer assignments are mandatory.

 

123      English II                                          5hr        40wk            5cr          Standard wt Advanced sophomore English students are expected to meet the requirements of an intensive, comprehensive program of grammar, literature, vocabulary and composition. Independent reading is required

 

121      English II Ethnic Studies                               5hr       40wk            5cr         Standard wt

This English class builds on the concepts of Ethnic Studies that students have learned in either their 8th and/or 9th grade Ethnic Studies classes. In this course students will continue to “read the word and the world” by engaging with various types of texts, analyzing systems of oppression, and ways of resistance. Like all Ethnic Studies classes, students will hone their Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening skills. All students will participate in a culminating Youth Participatory Action Research Project. PREREQUISITE: Students must have taken an 8th OR 9th grade Ethnic Studies class in Holyoke Public Schools

 

122      English II Ethnic Studies Honors                5hr        40wk            5cr    Standard wt  This

English class builds on the concepts of Ethnic Studies that students have learned in either their 8th and/or

9th grade Ethnic Studies classes. In this course students will continue to “read the word and the world” by engaging with various types of texts, analyzing systems of oppression, and ways of resistance. Like all Ethnic Studies classes, students will hone their Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening skills. All students will participate in a culminating Youth Participatory Action Research Project. Honors students will be expected to engage in outside reading, assignments, and projects that include library and literary

 

research.

PREREQUISITE: Students must have taken an 8th OR  9th grade Ethnic Studies class in Holyoke Public

Schools and must be recommended by their 9th grade Ethnic Studies teacher

 

130      English III Honors                                         5hr        40wk            5cr             Honors wt English III emphasizes critical thinking and analysis.  The focus of the course is American literature and formal critical literary composition.  In addition to poetry and short stories, students read classical literary works outside of class and are required to write analytical papers.  They will be expected to undertake outside reading and projects that include library and literary research.

PREREQUISITE:  Successful completion of English II 123 or English II Honors 120 and recommendation from the English II teacher. Summer assignments are mandatory.

 

139      AP English Language & Composition                5hr        40wk            5cr            AP wt Course description as per CollegeBoard: The AP English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods. Students must also complete several assignments over the summer to supplement what they will learn in the class. AP credit is contingent upon participation in the AP Exam for the course in May. PREREQUISITES: Junior standing, there are no prerequisite courses for AP English Language and

Composition. Students should be able to read and comprehend college-level texts and apply the conventions of

Standard Written English in their writing.

 

133      English III                                                      5hr        40wk            5cr          Standard wt English III emphasizes critical thinking and analysis.  The focus of the course is American literature and formal critical literary composition.  In addition to poetry and short stories, honors students read classical literary works outside of class and are required to write analytical papers.  Independent reading is required

 

140      English IV Honors                                        5hr        40wk            5cr             Honors wt English IV examines carefully the works and the authors of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf, the tales of Chaucer, the Elizabethan sonneteers, Shakespeare’s Macbeth, the Metaphysical poets, Swift’s satires, the Romantic poets, the Victorians, to the Twentieth Century writers.  Novels studied could be such works as Wuthering Heights, The Return of the Native, The Heart of Darkness, Frankenstein, The Hobbit, as well as such works as Les Miserables, Siddhartha and Metamorphosis.  Writing provides experiences in diverse composition modes.  A research paper of 7-12 pages is required. The course is demanding in time, and accelerated students should have a deep commitment to exploring, in depth, the world of literature and formal composition.

PREREQUISITE:  Successful completion of English III/English III Honors and recommendation from the English III teacher. Summer assignments are mandatory.

 

149      AP English Literature & Composition         5hr        40wk            5cr               AP wt Course description as per CollegeBoard: The AP English Literature and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works. Students must also complete several assignments over the summer to supplement what they will learn in the class.  AP credit is contingent upon participation in the AP Exam for the course in May.

PREREQUISITES: Senior standing, there are no prerequisite courses for AP English Literature and Composition. Students should be able to read and comprehend college-level texts and apply the conventions of Standard Written English in their writing.

 

143      English IV                                               5hr        40wk            5cr          Standard wt

English IV examines carefully the works and the authors of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf, the tales of Chaucer, the Elizabethan sonneteers, Shakespeare’s Macbeth, the Metaphysical poets, Swift’s satires, the Romantic poets, the Victorians, to the Twentieth Century writers.  Novels studied could be such works as Wuthering Heights, The Return of the Native, The Heart of Darkness, Frankenstein, The Hobbit, as well as such works as Les Miserables, Siddhartha and Metamorphosis.  Writing provides experiences in diverse composition modes.  A research paper of 7-12 pages is required as is independent reading.

 

702      Media                                                             5hr     40wk           5cr          Standard wt

Media is where Holyoke High’s award winning newspaper The Herald is created. Students interested in Media must have strong writing skills, a strong sense of self-motivation, and a desire to be an active member of the school community. The course is run workshop-style with a focus on journalistic writing, opinion writing, sports reporting, social media marketing, and photography. This course offers students a unique chance for their work to be viewed electronically by the entire school and outside community. Herald staffers must be committed, hard-working, and able to meet deadlines.

PREREQUISTE: Completion of English I and application and writing sample submitted to the advisor.

 

701      Intro to Media                                                 5hr      20wk       2.5cr        Standard wt

Intro to Media is intended as a half-year elective for freshmen and sophomores. In Intro to Media, students gain exposure to and practice working with modern media platforms. Tasks include writing journalistically, writing for a specific audience in an electronic format, hosting a podcast and the basics of interviewing, photojournalism, sports journalism, and using social media as a productive and professional tool.

 

722 SAT English Prep (Fall) 5hr 20wk 1.25cr    Standard wt
723 SAT English Prep (Spring) 5hr 20wk 1.25cr    Standard wt

This course will provide a focused presentation of the material that is covered on the SAT exam.  Practice

SAT exams will be administered, scored and discussed.  Specific SAT test taking strategies will be explored.

PREREQUISITE:  Must have a 2.0 GPA or better to enroll in this course.

 

737     Literature on the Screen                                5hr         20wk            2.5cr     Standard wt

The focus of this class is literature (plays, novels, poems and short stories) that have been adapted into films. The common core standards utilized are exclusively within the English Language Arts. Focus is put on close reading strategies, annotation for textual evidence, vocabulary and student discourse as well as using Venn Diagrams and other graphic organizers, learning to take proper notes to categorize work, and using evidence from the films to make connections and complete genre based writing assignments.

 

709      Creative Writing/Drama                               5hr         20wk            2.5cr     Standard wt Students will write in multiple creative genres including, but not limited to: poetry, short fiction, and creative non-fiction like personal essay/memoir, persuasive essay, and profile-writing. Students will read and discuss classic and contemporary works within the same genres in which they will write. The class will also focus on writing analytical essays on the work read in class. Students will run and submit to the school’s literary magazine, The Knightwriter.

 

786         Social Commentary and Satire                  5 hr         20wk              2.5cr      Standard wt Have you ever seen The Simpsons, read Animal Farm, seen Saturday Night Live, Blackfish, or Shrek? These are all examples of satire: the use of humor though irony, sarcasm and ridicule to discredit individuals, trends, institutions and societies. Students of this course will read, discuss and reflect on a variety of sources including drama, poetry, film and television.  Using multimedia and varied close readings students will develop and refine critical thinking skills, analytical skills, and become more proficient in essay writing.

 

712         Contemporary Urban Literature            5hr          20wk               2.5cr      Standard wt Studying urban literature and culture is important to validate the experiences and knowledge of urban youth, to promote critical thinking about urban arts –music, art, dance and culture—through reading, writing, speaking and listening, and to provide the roots of social change.  It speaks about and against racial, economic and political oppression. During the semester, students will understand the roles of POWER and ACTIVISM in urban literature and culture. They will read a novel and write an analysis regarding the elements that make it a work of urban literature as well as read short stories and poems written as works of urban literature. They will analyze, write and perform hip hop / spoken word poetry, analyze hip hop lyrics, and write a song review. They will examine the elements of hip hop including: break dancing, graffiti, social justice.

 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS

 

The English Language Learners (ELL) Program offers the limited English proficient student a unique opportunity to participate fully in the educational process at Holyoke High School.  The program seeks to provide its students with a broad range of academic courses to prepare them to pursue post-secondary education, or to enter the world of work.  Students have the opportunity to explore the cultural aspects of our community through coursework and their enrollment in elective courses in the art, business, music, and physical education departments.

The ELL Program follows the sheltered immersion philosophy.  The ELL program offers a range of sheltered immersion courses which will allow the student to achieve at the same rate as the mainstream program student.

ELL mathematics, science and social studies courses are included under their respective departments and are equivalent to those courses offered in the mainstream.  ELL students whose English proficiency allows them to participate fully are encouraged to take mainstream academic courses.

Spanish Language Art courses provide for the development of language and literary skills at the high school level.

English as a Second Language (E.S.L.) courses are designed to provide the ELL Program students with the skills necessary to succeed in an English speaking environment. E.L.L. courses are levelized in order to allow students to be placed and to progress through the program as they acquire skills in English.   All students are placed in E.S.L. classes according to their English proficiency, not by grade level.

 

156      Newcomer English as a Second Language   5hr     40wk          5cr          Standard wt Newcomer ESL I is a dedicated ESL course designed to meet the specific English language instructional needs of beginning English learners who are new to US schools (Newcomers). ESL I instruction focuses on developing students’ ability to listen, read, speak and write in English for both social and academic purposes. Emphasis is placed on guiding students through the acculturation process and building oral language as a foundation for academic English development.

 

157      Newcomer Literature and Composition I  5hr       40wk          5cr          Standard wt Newcomer Lit/Com 1 is an SCI Language Arts course designed to meet the specific English language instructional needs of beginning English learners who are new to US schools (Newcomers). The course will foster understandings and applications in the language arts and in composition and communication, and familiarize students with a variety of literature in order to build content-specific vocabulary and concepts.

 

158      Beginning English as a Second Language  Ii    5hr  40wk      5cr             Standard wt Newcomer ESL II is a dedicated ESL course designed to meet the specific English language instructional needs of beginning English learners. ESL II instruction is focused on students’ academic, social and instructional English language needs within the context of content area topics.

 

159      Beginning Literature & Composition II       5hr    40wk             5cr        Standard wt Newcomer Lit/Com 2 is an SCI Language Arts course designed to meet the specific English language instructional needs of beginning English learners. The course will foster understandings   and   applications   in   the   language   arts   and   in   composition   and

 

communication,  and  familiarize  students  with  a  variety  of  literature  as  a  bridge  to meaningful participation in grade-level Language Arts.

 

166      Intermediate English as a Second Language   5hr   40wk        5cr          Standard wt Intermediate ESL is designed to develop intermediate English learners’ language and literacy skills through contextualized and meaningful practices that integrate grade-level academic content standards. The course follows a dedicated ESL curriculum focused on students’ academic, social and instructional language needs within the context of content area topics.

 

167      Advanced English as a Second Language     5hr    40wk             5cr        Standard wt Advanced ESL is designed to deepen and extend advanced English learners’ language and literacy skills through contextualized and meaningful practices that integrate grade- level academic content standards. The course follows a dedicated ESL curriculum focusing on English discourse features, language forms, functions and vocabulary with the aim of accelerating academic achievement and transitioning successfully to the mainstream.

 

168      English as a Second Language Topics        5hr       40wk          5cr          Standard wt ESL Topics is designed as a transitional course for bridging English learners to enhance their ability to use the features and forms of the English language effectively in a variety of academic and social settings. The course will focus on language and literacy connected and aligned to grade-level content standards within the context of content area topics such as Urban Literature, Creative Writing/Drama, or Contemporary Issues.

 

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT

 

 

The Mathematics program provides a sequential approach at both exploratory and challenging levels to suit present and future educational, vocational, and cultural needs of Holyoke students.  The content is selected and organized with due regard for principles of learning such  as  those  concerning readiness,  motivation, rates  of  learning, and  degrees  of mastery. Attention is given in learning activities to fundamental principles of mathematics and, at the same time, significant applications are made within the learner’s range of understanding and interest.

Algebra  I  through  Pre-Calculus  courses   are   aligned   to   the   Massachusetts   Curriculum

Frameworks.

 

334      College Algebra I B                                       5hr            40wk         5cr         Standard wt

This is a full year course that covers the second half of Algebra I. This course is recommended for students who have successfully completed College Algebra IA. Topics include properties

of exponents, operations on polynomials, solving quadratic equations and graphing quadratics

equations. Emphasis is placed on pre-requisite skills needed for success in algebra.

 

323 Financial Literacy 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt
324 Financial Literacy- Half Year 5 hr 20wk 2.5cr Standard wt

Financial Literacy is a real world math class designed to help students navigate their

financial future. Topics include: Earning money, personal finance, saving for the future, spending money wisely, transportation, aspects of purchasing and owning a vehicle, housing and home improvements, investments, taxes and retirement.

PREREQUISITE: Available for seniors who need to fulfill a math requirement. Please note the half year financial literacy does not fulfill a full year math requirement and should be taken for elective credit only.

 

325      Standards Based Math                              5hr       40wk              5cr        Standard wt This course is recommended for students that scored a 220 to 238 on the MCAS. This course is an in-depth review of the standards in the Massachusetts Frameworks for Mathematics required to support students in proficiency on the MCAS retest and EPP test.

 

332      Col Algebra I Honors                       5hr                  40wk               5cr            Honors wt This course provides a formal development of the algebraic skills and concepts necessary for students to succeed in advanced courses. This is an accelerated course that covers all of the topics in College Algebra I but topics are covered at a faster pace which allows for more depth and application of concepts. The major topics include linear equations in one and two variables, systems of equations, applications, rational exponents, operations on polynomial expressions, solving quadratic equations, and data analysis. Students also work with functions and their properties including quadratic and exponential functions.

 

373 College Algebra I 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt
377 College Algebra I 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt

This course provides a formal development of the algebraic skills and concepts necessary for

students to succeed in future math courses. Students continue their work started in grade 8 on linear equations in one and two variables. Other topics include systems of equations, applications,

 

rational exponents, operations on polynomial expressions, solving quadratic equations, and data analysis. Students also work with functions including quadratic and exponential functions.

 

375 Quantitative Reasoning I 2.5hr 20wk 2.5cr Standard wt
376 Quantitative Reasoning II 2.5hr 20wk 2.5cr Standard wt

This is a sequence of two semester-long courses that cover the content of Pre-Algebra and is

intended to support students that have not mastered the prerequisite skills or need additional instruction to be successful in Algebra I. Topics include operations with real numbers, solving equations and inequalities in one variable including proportions, applications, introduction to functions, graphing linear equations, lines and angle relationships, right triangles and transformations in space.

PREREQUISITE: This class is by referral.  A combination of 8th grade teacher recommendation, 8th grade end of year STAR scores, family input, 9th grade teacher input, and if desired 9th grade STAR scores will be used to determine student placement.

 

340      College Geometry Honors                5hr                  40wk               5cr            Honors wt

This course is based on Euclidean Geometry. This is an accelerated course that covers all of the topics in College Geometry but topics are covered at a faster pace which allows for more depth and application of concepts. It emphasizes the study of the properties and applications of common geometric figures in two and three dimensions. Topics include triangle congruence and similarity, application of similarity to right triangle trigonometry, extension of the Pythagorean Theorem to special right triangles, properties of polygons, measurement including area, volume and surface

area and transformations. Student will make geometric constructions and will use deductive reasoning to do geometric proofs.

 

353 College Geometry 5hr 40wk 5cr   Standard  wt
357 College Geometry 5hr 40wk 5cr  Standard wt

This course is based on Euclidian Geometry. It emphasizes the study of the properties and

applications of common geometric figures in two and three dimensions. Topics include triangle congruence and similarity, application of similarity to right triangle trigonometry, extension of the Pythagorean Theorem to special right triangles, properties of polygons, measurement including area, volume and surface area, transformations and constructions. Students will also prove basic geometry theorems and extend their work with probability.

 

365 College Algebra I Honors/Accelerated 5hr 20wk 2.5cr Honors wt
366 College Geometry Honors/Accelerated        5hr 20wk 2.5cr Honors wt

These courses continue the Algebra sequence begun in the 8th grade and begins the first

half of the Geometry course. Algebra topics include properties of exponents, operations on polynomials and solving quadratic equations. Students work with functions including quadratic and exponential functions. Geometry topics include the study of the properties and applications of common geometric figures in two and three dimensions, triangle congruence and properties of polygons. Student will make geometric constructions and will use deductive reasoning to do geometric proofs.

PREREQUISITE:  Successful completion the first half of Algebra in the 8th grade and a passing grade on the prerequisite exam. Freshman standing only.

 

College Geometry Accelerated culminates the Geometry course for accelerated students begun in the 9th grade.  Geometry topics include similarity and application of similarity to right triangle trigonometry, extension of the Pythagorean Theorem to special right triangles, properties of polygons, measurement including area, volume and surface area, transformations and constructions. Students will also prove basic geometry theorems and extend work with probability.

College  Algebra  II  Accelerated  introduces  students  who  have  completed  College Geometry Honors 359 in the Fall term of tenth grade to topics in Algebra.  Some of the topics included are:               Simplifying rational expressions and solving rational equations. Quadratic, cubic, polynomial and inverse functions and their properties including finding zeros, maximum and minimum points and shifts and reflections. (Spring only) PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Algebra 365 & Geometry 366

 

350      Col Algebra II Honors                                   5hr        40wk       5cr                  Honors wt This is an accelerated course that covers all of the topics in College Algebra II but topics are covered at a faster pace which allows for more depth and application of concepts. This course continues an abstract approach to problem solving. Work with polynomials and

polynomial functions is extended to include the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra.  Previous work with functions is extended to exponential, logarithmic, rational and trigonometric functions including asymptotes, intercepts and zeros. Other topics include complex numbers, rational expressions and equations, radical expressions and equations.

 

383      College Algebra II                                        5hr       40wk       5cr             Standard wt This course is designed to build on algebraic skills taught in Algebra I and continues an abstract approach to problem solving. Students continue their work with polynomials and polynomial functions and it is extended to include the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. Previous work with functions is extended to exponential, logarithmic and rational functions. Students will investigate characteristics of the various functions including asymptotes, intercepts, and zeros and use these to sketch graphs. Other topics include complex numbers, rational expressions and equations and radical expressions and equations.

 

380      Pre-Calculus Honors                                      5hr        40wk          5cr              Honors wt This is an accelerated course that covers all of the topics in Pre-Calculus but topics are covered at a faster pace which allows for more depth and application of concepts.

This course expands understandings of various topics studied in Algebra II and also introduces various new concepts. Students continue their work with complex numbers and  polynomial  and  logarithmic  functions.  This  includes  the  role  of  e,  natural  and common logarithms, laws of exponents and logarithms, and the solutions of logarithmic and exponential equations. Students will investigate and identify the characteristics of functions including zeros, asymptotes, intercepts, symmetry, intervals for which the function is increasing or decreasing, maximum and minimum points and use these to sketch graphs.  This course includes a two month unit on Trigonometry.

 

382      Pre-Calculus                                               5hr       40wk            5cr              Honors wt This course expands understandings of various topics studied in Algebra II and also introduces various new concepts. Students continue their work with complex numbers

 

and exponential equations. Students will investigate and identify the characteristics of functions including zeros, asymptotes, intercepts, symmetry, intervals for which the function is increasing or decreasing, maximum and minimum points and use these to sketch graphs.  This course includes a two month unit on Trigonometry.

 

380      Calculus Honors and Lab                            7.5hr    40wk         7.5cr           Honors wt This course introduces the properties of functions of a single variable defined on continuous sets of real numbers.  Some of the topics covered are:  limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, applications of differentiation and integration, infinite series, differential equations, and vector-valued functions. This course is strongly recommended for future physical science and engineering majors.

PREREQUISITE:   Successful completion of math course through Algebra II and permission of Department Chair.

 

379      Calculus w/lab AP                                           5hr       40wk           5cr                     AP wt The curriculum follows the topical outline for Calculus AB. The students are required to take the AP Calculus Exam in the Spring. The major topics studied are functions, graphs and  Limits;  Including  limits  of  a  function,  asymptotic  behavior  and  continuity. Derivatives; including derivatives of a function and applications. Integrals; Students will use the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus to calculate definite and indefinite integrals. Students will also apply integrals to find the area of a region or volume of a solid of revolution. The depth of exploration is intense and occurs at a fast pace. PREREQUISITE:  B- or higher in Honors Pre-Calculus or teacher recommendation

 

369      Statistics w/Lab AP                                        5hr     40wk           5cr                    AP wt The  curriculum  follows  the  topical  outline  for  an  Advanced  Statistics  course.  The students are required to take the AP Statistics Exam in the Spring. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. The four broad conceptual themes are: Exploring Data (describing patterns and departures from patterns); Sampling and Experimentation (planning and conducting a study); Anticipating Patterns (exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation); and Statistical Inference (estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses). This course requires a lot of written analysis. The depth of exploration is intense and occurs at a very fast pace.

PREREQUISITE:   Can be taken concurrently with Algebra II or upon successful completion of Algebra II. Freshman scoring a B+ or higher in Accelerated Algebra are eligible to take AP STATs Sophomore year.

 

393      Probability & Statistics                               5hr       40wk           5cr         Standard  wt This course focuses on data analysis. Students will study statistical procedures and probabilistic situations. The course emphasizes the use of either the computer or the graphing calculator to solve world/real life problems.

PREREQUISITE:   Can be taken concurrently with Algebra II or upon successful completion of Algebra II.

 

This course will provide a focused presentation of the material that is covered on the SAT exam.   Practice SAT exams will be administered, scored and discussed.   General test taking strategies will be explored.

PREREQUISITE: A 2.0 G.P.A. or better to enroll in the course.

 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT

 

All courses in the Music Department are open to students at all grade levels.  Many of these courses provide opportunities for students to work with electronic equipment.

 

Performance:      These are courses in which students use their performing skills, sing, and play instruments.

 

Theory:                These are courses in which students develop aural and notational skills and compose music.

 

950 Band 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt
951 Band ½ 5hr 20wk 2.5cr Standard wt
949 Band A/B 2.5hr 40wk 2.5cr Standard wt

Marching band and concert band. Students will continue to develop their technical and

artistic skills through the performance of functional and art music of different genres and cultures in a variety of performance settings. Emphasis will be placed on developing aesthetic values through active participation. Musicianship is stressed, with the focus being placed on music reading, listening skills, and ensemble playing. Students must be available to perform at school activities, public concerts, parades, and music festivals as well as weekly evening rehearsals. Performances are a natural outgrowth of the students’ work in this course.

PREREQUISITE: Teacher recommendation or middle school band experience with teacher approval.

 

954 Instrumental Music 2.5hr 40wk 2.5cr Standard wt
955 Instrumental Music 5 hr 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt
956 Instrumental Music 5hr 20wk 2.5cr Standard wt

Students will learn to read music and to play or further develop their ability to play woodwind,

brass, or percussion instruments. Focus will be placed on developing a fundamental understanding of reading music, music vocabulary as well as musicianship. Students will practice in a large ensemble as well as in like instrument groups. Winter and spring concert attendance is mandatory.

 

952      Introduction to Music                                  5hr       40wk          2.5cr       Standard wt This course provides students a hands-on learning experience dealing with the four basic groups of musical instruments.  Students are introduced to and practice instruments such as recorder and percussion instruments.  They will learn to play and read basic melodies and rhythms.  The outcome of this course is to instill in the student a lifelong interest in music. Performances are always welcomed, but are not mandatory.

 

960 Choir 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt
961 Choir ½ 5hr 20wk 2.5cr Standard wt

This course requires no audition, and all students are welcome.  It provides opportunities

for musical and social growth.  Students receive vocal training and develop their aural skills.  The choir performs at public concerts, school activities, and community functions. Performances are a natural outgrowth of the students’ work in this course.

 

 

970 Madrigal Honors 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt
964 Madrigal (Semester) Honors 5hr 20wk 2.5cr Standard wt
969 Madrigal (A/B) Honors 2.5 hr 40wk 2.5cr Standard wt

This is a small select group of singers who perform Classical to modern works in

multiple part harmony without accompaniment.     They perform at civic and school related functions as well as participate in competitions.  HCC articulation agreement

– 1 college credit

PREREQUISITE: Consent of Instructor

 

959 Bell Choir 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt
967 Bell Choir 2.5hr 20wk 2.5cr Standard wt

This course is open to interested students who desire to perform in a small ensemble

using handbells.  Students will study the technique of handbell ringing and the reading of sheet  music  for  handbells.    They  will  perform  at  school  events  as  well  as  civic ceremonies.

PREREQUISITE: Consent of Instructor.

 

971      Music Lab                                                      5hr        20wk      2.50cr           Standard wt This course is for students who want to learn fundamental musical skills.  No musical background is necessary, just a desire to learn.  Students will carry out projects based on based on using the latest music software for theory, composition, and recording. This class will cover the same curriculum as Music Theory I and Electronic Music at Holyoke Community College. Class size may be limited to facilitate access to the equipment. HCC articulation agreement – 5 college credits

 

976 String Orchestra 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt
977 String Orchestra Semester 5hr 20wk 2.5cr Standard wt
978 String Orchestra A/B 2.5 hr 40wk 2.5cr Standard wt

Students will begin or continue study on the violin and cello. Emphasis will be  placed

on developing aesthetic values through active participation. Musicianship is stressed, with the focus being placed on music reading, listening skills, and ensemble playing. Winter and spring concert attendance is mandatory.

PREREQUISITE:   Previous lessons in violin and cello at the middle or high school level. Beginners are welcome.

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/ HEALTH & WELLNESS

 

920      Physical Education                                        5hr        20wk       2.5cr           Standard wt

919      Physical Education-Alternating                 2.5hr    40wk       2.5cr          Standard wt This course develops physical powers and skills in a variety of sports and activities, which facilitates an understanding of physical activity and helps provide a meaningful social experience.   The activities and sports include:   flag football, soccer, tennis, conditioning, badminton, floor hockey, basketball, softball, indoor soccer, volleyball, team handball, lacrosse, ultimate Frisbee, swimming, weight training, table tennis, cross country skiing and new games.   It facilitates the understanding of physical activity as being something that is done throughout one’s life.   Students receive study guides for each of the activities that they participate in that contain pertinent information regarding the particular sport.  Students are evaluated on class participation, knowledge testing and open response questions.

 

921      Physical Education 9/10                               5hr       20wk       2.5cr          Standard wt This course develops physical powers and skills in a variety of sports and activities, which facilitates an understanding of physical activity and helps provide a meaningful social experience.   The activities and sports include:   flag football, soccer, tennis, conditioning, badminton, floor hockey, basketball, softball, indoor soccer, volleyball, team handball, lacrosse, ultimate Frisbee, swimming, weight training, table tennis, cross country skiing and new games.   It facilitates the understanding of physical activity as being something that is done throughout one’s life.   Students receive study guides for each of the activities that they participate in that contain pertinent information regarding the particular sport.  Students are evaluated on class participation, knowledge testing and open response questions.

 

916      Lifeguarding                                                  5hr        20wk             2.5cr    Standard wt This course is offered to juniors and seniors as an elective.  This class may give students American Red Cross certification, which will allow them to get jobs after school as well as during the summer.  The course will consist of water training as well as bookwork, open  response  questions  and  CPR  training.                                                           Students  are  expected  to  successfully demonstrate competency in all skill areas, participate in a minimum of 80% of the classes as well as attain a minimum grade of 80% on each of the three written exams.  The course may  certify  students  in  Standard  First  Aid,  CPR  for  the  Professional  Rescuer  and Lifeguard Training.

PREREQUISITE:   Students must have attained a B or better in regular Physical Education classes.  They must also have the instructor’s recommendation, which is based on the student’s ability to perform a swimming skills test (300-yard swim and brick retrieval).   Junior or senior standing only.; This class will not be offered during the

2017-2018 school year.

 

 

 

905      Health                                                        5hr          20wks     2.5cr             Standard wt This course provides students with an understanding of current health issues as they relate to teens.  The objective of this course is to develop strong decision making skills based on accurate current information relative to teen issues.  Topics include wellness/safety, stress/mental health, violence, substance abuse, nutrition and human sexuality.

 

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

 

453 Biology I w/lab 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt
458 Biology I SEI w/lab 5hr 40wk 7.5cr Standard wt

This is the first year of a two-year sequence which provides an insight into the process by which

scientific knowledge is gained and an overview of the science of biology. This course begins with an overview of the evolutionary history of biological diversity including the early earth, the origins of prokaryotic life, and eukaryotic diversity. Animal form and function, and ecology begin the two- year biology sequence. To be successful in Biology I Standard w/lab, students must be able to:

read effectively for information and understanding, communicate effectively as writers and speakers, and use critical thinking, problem-solving, and reasoning techniques effectively. This course is recommended for those students who may not be interested in pursuing a career in a science related field

 

407      Biology I Honors w/lab                                5hr       40wk           5cr            Honors wt This is the first year of a two-year sequence which provides an insight into the process by which scientific knowledge is gained and an enriched overview of the science of biology. This course begins with an overview of the evolutionary history of biological diversity including the early earth the origins of prokaryotic life, and eukaryotic diversity. Animal form and function, and ecology begin the two-year biology sequence.   The enriched nature of the course means that the concepts are presented in significantly greater depth and detail than in Biology I Standard w/lab.  To be successful in Biology I Honors w/lab, students must be able to:    read effectively for information and understanding, communicate effectively as writers and speakers, and use critical thinking, problem- solving, and reasoning techniques effectively. .

 

442 Biology II w/Lab 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt
437 Biology II SEI w/Lab 5hr 40wk 7.5cr Standard wt

This is the second year of a two-year sequence which provides an insight into the process by which

scientific knowledge is gained and an overview of the science of biology. The molecular basis of biology and the architecture of the cell are presented as the foundation for the analysis of more complex organismic functions and processes such as photosynthesis, respiration, and the cell cycle. The second year of the sequence concludes with a study of genetics and the mechanisms of evolution. To be successful in Biology II Standard w/lab, students must be able to: read

effectively for information and understanding, communicate effectively as writers and speakers, and use critical thinking, problem-solving, and reasoning techniques effectively.

 

402      Biology II Honors w/lab                                  5hr    40wk          5cr                 Honors wt This is the second year of a two-year sequence which provides an insight into the process by which scientific knowledge is gained and an enriched overview of the science of biology.  The molecular basis of biology and the architecture of the cell are presented as the foundation for the analysis of more complex organismic functions and processes such as photosynthesis, respiration, and the cell cycle. The first year of the sequence concludes with a study of genetics and the mechanisms of evolution.  The enriched nature of the course means that the concepts are presented in significantly greater depth and detail than in Biology II Standard w/lab. To be successful in Biology II Honors w/lab, students must be able to:  read effectively for information and understanding, communicate effectively

 

as  writers  and  speakers,  and  use  critical  thinking,  problem-solving,  and  reasoning techniques effectively.

 

459      AP Biology & Lab                                          7.5hr     40wk           7.5cr                   AP wt

AP Biology is a year-long course for exceptionally motivated students. AP Biology at Holyoke High School is designed to help students achieve success on the AP Biology examination, which is administered in mid-May. The course is intended to provide interesting and challenging experiences that are beyond the scope of Standard and Honor Biology courses at the high school level. The AP program considers the laboratory part of the curriculum as one of its major focuses. The course consists of the following units: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Genetics, Evolution, Biological Diversity, and Ecology. This course is recommended only for those students interested in a challenging intellectual experience or possible science career. To be successful in AP Biology, students must be able to: read effectively for information and understanding, communicate effectively as writers and speakers, and use critical thinking, problem-solving, and reasoning techniques effectively. Students must also complete several assignments over the summer to supplement what they will learn in the class.  AP credit is contingent upon participation in the AP Exam for the course in May. PREREQUISITES: Preferred to have taken or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry and/or recommendation from a Biology teacher.

 

401      PreAP Biology Honors w/lab                           5hr      40wk             5cr             Honors wt

The Pre-AP Biology curriculum is an accelerated introductory course which covers all aspects of a high school biology course in a single year.  The primary objective of the course is to provide students with a fundamental understanding of modern biology and scientific processes, building a foundation for success in the college level AP courses to follow.  Pre-AP Biology is recommended for high-achieving freshman students that have excelled at the eighth grade level.  Students need to be recommended by their eighth grade teacher and will be expected to enroll in an AP science class their sophomore year upon successful completion of the course.

PREREQUISITES: Students need to be recommended by their eighth grade teacher and will be expected to enroll in an AP science class their sophomore year upon successful completion of the course.

 

412      Introductory Human Anatomy                   5hr       20wk          2.5cr       Standard wt This one semester introductory course will cover the basic concepts of human anatomy and physiology.  It will offer an introduction to the study of the gross and microscopic structure of the human body using a systemic approach. This course will cover aspects of all  the major body systems.   To be successful in Introductory to Human Anatomy, students must be able to:    read effectively for information and understanding, communicate effectively as writers and speakers, and use critical thinking, problem- solving, and reasoning techniques effectively.

PREREQUISITE: Sophomore, Junior or Senior standing with passing grade in biology and/or chemistry or permission of department chair.

 

483 Chemistry I Standard w/lab 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard  wt
487 Chemistry I Standard w/lab 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt

This course is a standards-based study of fundamental chemical concepts, such as atomic theory

and its relation to chemical behavior, chemical bonding, the mole and stoichiometry, gas kinetics, energy relationships, solution dynamics, acids-bases, equilibrium, organic and biological chemistry, and nuclear interactions. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of mathematical, analytical, data acquisition, and communication skills as well as interdisciplinary approaches to

 

discovery. Concepts and skills are reinforced by a strong emphasis on hands-on laboratory experiences and the integration of other branches of science.

PREREQUISITE: Bio I and concurrent Bio II

 

444      Chemistry I Honors w/lab                          5hr           40wk       5cr                  Honors wt

This course is a standards-based study of fundamental chemical concepts, such as atomic theory and its relation to chemical behavior, chemical bonding, the mole and stoichiometry, gas kinetics, energy relationships, solution dynamics, acids-bases, equilibrium, organic and biological chemistry, and nuclear interactions. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of mathematical, analytical, data acquisition, and communication skills as well as interdisciplinary approaches to discovery. Concepts and skills are reinforced by a strong emphasis on hands-on laboratory experiences and the integration of other branches of science. The enriched nature of this course means that the concepts are presented in significantly greater depth and detail than Standard chemistry. The instructional pace is also significantly faster with a much greater emphasis upon mathematical skills and supplemental work done outside the classroom.

PREREQUISITE: Bio I and concurrent Bio II

 

448      Chemistry II w/Lab                                   5hr          40wk       5cr              Standard wt This is the second year of a two-year sequence which provides an insight into the process by which scientific knowledge is gained and an overview of the science of chemistry. Picking up  where  Chemistry I  Standard w/lab  left  off,  this  course  begins with  the behavior of solutions, including acids and bases.  Chemical reactions, including reaction energy and reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, and oxidation-reduction reactions are also covered. An overview of organic and nuclear chemistry completes the two-year chemistry sequence.   The instructional pace is slower than that of Chemistry I Honors w/lab with less emphasis on supplemental work done outside of the classroom.  To be successful in Chemistry I Standard w/lab, students must be able to:  read effectively for information and understanding, communicate effectively as writers and speakers, and use critical thinking, problem-solving, and reasoning techniques effectively.  This course is recommended for those students who may not be interested in pursuing a career in a science related field.

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Chemistry I w/lab.

This course will not be offered for the 2016-2017 school year.

 

492      Physics II Honors w/Lab                          7.5hr     40wk         7.5cr              Honors wt This is the second year of a two-year sequence which provides an insight into the process by which scientific knowledge is gained and an overview of the science of physics.   As Newton  said, “If I have seen further than others, it is because I have stood on the shoulders of giants.” All students deserve to understand the world in which they live, and here is where the journey continues.   Introductory Physics II is a continuation of Introductory Physics I which provides an in-depth introduction to physics in preparation for  taking the physics  MCAS  test.   A large component of this course  is the many computer based labs performed throughout the year.   To be successful in introductory Physics II, students must be able to:  read effectively for information and understanding, communicate effectively as writers and speakers, and use critical thinking, problem- solving and reasoning techniques effectively.   Students with a strong mathematical background and who are planning a career in engineering are encouraged to take Introductory Physics II.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Successful completion of AP Physics I and concurrent enrollment in

PreCalculus or higher math course. This course will run every other year.

 

480      Physics AP I w/Lab                                     7.5hr      40wk         7.5cr                      AP wt

As Galileo said, “Not only have we been given eyes to see the wonders of the universe, but we have been given a brain to understand them.” All students deserve to understand the world in which they live, and here is where the journey starts. AP Physics I offers students an algebra based in-depth introduction to physics for students with stronger mathematical backgrounds seeking to understand the wonders of classical physics. The topics covered will include classical mechanics (kinematics and dynamics), vectors, rotational motion, fluid dynamics energy, the conservation laws and simple circuits.  A large component of this course are the many computer based labs performed throughout the year. To be successful in AP Physics I, students must be able to:  read effectively for information and understanding, communicate effectively as writers and speakers, and use critical thinking, problem-solving, and reasoning techniques effectively.  Students with a

strong mathematical background and who are planning a career in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) are encouraged to take AP Physics I.  Students must also complete several assignments over the summer to supplement what they will learn in the class. AP credit is contingent upon participation in the AP Exam for the course in May.

PREREQUISITES:  Completed Geometry and concurrently be taking Algebra II or higher level math course.

 

494      AP Physics C: Mechanics                 7.5hr               40wk    7.5cr               AP wt

This course offers an in-depth introduction to physical theory to students with stronger mathematical backgrounds, including pre-calculus. The topics covered will include those of AP Physics I, but will be covered in much greater detail, with additional material, and requiring more mathematical computations. Additional topics such as lasers, basic optics, simple machines, thermodynamics, and modern physics will be covered. A large component of this course is the many computer based labs performed throughout the year. To be successful in AP Physics C: Mechanics, students must be able to: read effectively for information and understanding, communicate effectively as writers and speakers, and use critical thinking, problem-solving and reasoning effectively. Students must also complete several assignments over the summer to supplement what they will learn in the class. AP credit is contingent upon participation in the AP Exam for the course in May.

PREREQUISITES: Have successfully completed AP Physics I and completed

PreCalculus/Trigonometry and concurrent enrollment in AP Calculus.

 

403      Plant and Animal Science w/lab                   5hr      40 wk              5 cr      Standard wt This course provides an overview of the biological principles that distinguish living thing from nonliving things. The plant and animal kingdoms are studied with emphasis placed on the comparison of the structure and function of representative organisms. The course will offer an understanding of the development of scientific thought, scientific inquiry, and  the  application  of  scientific  principles.  This  course  will  be  divided  into  two semesters. The first semester will be devoted to Plant Science and semester two will concentrate on  Animal Science. Experimental work  is included in this class. To be successful in Plant and Animal Science, students must be able to: read effectively for information and understanding, communicate effectively as writers and speakers, and use critical thinking, problem solving, and reasoning techniques effectively. This course is recommended for those students who may not be interested in pursuing a career in a science related field.

 

Prerequisite:  Junior or Senior standing with passing grade in biology and/or chemistry or permission of department chair.

 

404      Physical Science w/ lab                                  5hr      40 wk              5 cr      Standard wt Physical Science is a laboratory science course that explores the relationship between matter and energy. Students investigate physical science concepts through an inquiry based   approach.   Embedded   stands   for   inquiry,   technology  &   engineering,   and mathematics are  taught  in  the  context of  the  content standards for  Energy,  Matter, Motion, and Forces. The Physical Science Program integrates Chemistry, Physics, Earth Science, and applied Mathematics. This course emphasizes the connections between these subjects and cross-disciplinary applications and helps students think analytically. To be successful in Physical Science, students must be able to: read effectively for information and understanding, communicate effectively as writers and speakers, and use critical thinking,  problem  solving,  and   reasoning  techniques  effectively.  This  course  is recommended for those students who may not be interested in pursuing a career in a science related field.

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing with passing grade in biology and/or chemistry or permission of department chair.

 

419      Environmental Science AP                           5hr      40wk               7.5cr                AP Wt.

The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a one semester, introductory college course in environmental science. The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Students must

also complete several assignments over the summer to supplement what they will learn in the class.  AP credit is contingent upon participation in the AP Exam for the course in May. PREREQUISITES: Biology I and Chemistry is recommended.

 

414      Earth Science                                                 5hr      40 wk              5 cr                  Standard wt The Earth science course is designed to interpret and understand the world around you. Students will focus on the basic principles of geology, meteorology, oceanography, environmental science, and astronomy. The class will be focused on student centered learning with an emphasis placed on group collaboration and project based learning.  The course is recommended for juniors and seniors that have completed their MCAS graduation requirements.

PREREQUISITES: Juniors or seniors with a passing grade in Biology or Chemistry

 

418      Marine Biology                                              5hr      20wk               2.5cr                Standard wt This is a one semester introductory course designed to provide students with a background in marine biology. The first section includes the physical properties of the ocean including its origins, how oceans are structured, and the roles of waves, tides and currents. The second section of the course focuses on the diversity of marine life, their life cycles, and how they adapt to the marine ecosystem. The final section looks at human impact on the oceans and related environmental issues. Experimental work will be included in this class. To be successful in the course, students must be able to: read effectively for information and understanding, communicate as writers and speakers and use critical thinking, problem solving and reasoning techniques effectively. PREREQUISITES: Biology I or Accelerated Biology

 

SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT

 

The Social Studies Department is charged with the essential responsibility of teaching democratic principles.  In addition, the Social Studies Department stresses the following goals: the development of critical thought, broad acceptance of and respect for other peoples’ culture, enlightened patriotism, active informed citizenship, knowledge of significant developments in human history, acquisition and understanding of fundamental skills, and an appreciation of the interrelationship of all disciplines.

The pivotal course, which all students must successfully complete, is United States History.  This course is required for graduation from a secondary school in the Commonwealth. Students must pass three full year courses to meet HHS graduation requirements.

 

211 World History Honors 5hr 40wk 5cr Honors wt
203 World History 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt
207 World History 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt

World History provides an overview of the history of human society in the past few

centuries  from  the  Renaissance  period  to  the  contemporary period.  Topics  covered include  exploring  the  political,  economic,  social,  religious,  military,  scientific,  and cultural developments.

PREREQUISITE  for  Honors:  Successful  completion  of  other  courses  at  a  high academic standing and strong reading and writing skills.

 

204      World History AP                                          5 hr       40 wk          5 cr                    AP wt Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level World History courses, this course introduces students to world civilizations and cultures. The course reviews every major region in the world from the dawn of civilization to present day, focusing on the “Big Picture”, the things shared between civilizations, the causes of change, and the impact made when civilizations meet.   Common threads in history, such as trade, religion, politics, society, and technology, will be explored.

Students may earn college credit upon passing the AP Exam given by the College Board at the conclusion of the course.

AP is a college level course taught in high school.  As such, one of its greatest demands will be on your time. You will not succeed in this course unless you spend a minimum of

6-8 hours per week outside class studying World History.

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of other history courses at a high academic standing, strong reading and writing skills, recommendation by previous history teacher. Students who fail to complete required summer work may be at risk of failing.

 

200 American Government Honors 5hr 40wk 5cr Honors wt
202 American Government 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt

This comprehensive course provides an overview of the structure, functions and current

issues facing American Government. This is achieved through examination of political structures, constitutional principles, right/responsibilities, the role of political parties/interest groups and the importance of civic participation.

PREREQUISITE: Senior standing. (Some exceptions may apply.)

PREREQUISITE for Honors: Successful completion of other history courses at a high academic standing, strong reading and writing skills, and the approval of the department chair. Senior standing.

 

233      Law in America                                            5hr       20wk          2.5cr        Standard wt This course examines the history and philosophy of law as part of U.S. society and includes the study of criminal, civil law, and the workings of the legal system. Topics covered include constitutional rights, torts, contracts, property, family law, and equity.

 

242      European History AP                                    5hr        40wk        5cr                        AP wt Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level European History courses, this course provides a study of political, social, economic and religious ideas and events influencing Europe from the high Renaissance to the recent past. The course aims at developing a better understanding of Europe through a study of the main factors contributing to its development.                                                   In addition, a major focus will be placed on developing the skills to analyze historical evidence and the ability to express historical understanding through writing. AP European History is a college level course taught in high school.  Students may earn college credit upon passing the AP Exam given by the College Board at the conclusion of the course.

PREREQUISITE:  Successful completion of other history courses at a high academic standing, strong reading and writing skills, recommendation by previous history teacher. Students who fail to complete required summer work may be at risk of failing.

 

240      U.S. History I Honors                                    5hr        40wk           5cr              Honors wt This course is an advanced course which covers the full range of United States history from Colonial America to Reconstruction.                             The course will also cover the history of political institutions, behavior and public policy, social and economic change, democracy and international relations, as well as cultural and intellectual development. PREREQUISITE: Strong reading and writing skills.

 

243 U.S. History I 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt
247 U.S. History I 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt

This course will cover United States History from Colonial America to Reconstruction

with an emphasis on the Constitution. Topics covered will include the history of political institutions, public policy, social and economic change, democracy and international relations as well as cultural and intellectual development.

 

248      Pre AP United States History I Honors       5hr        40wk          5cr          Honors wt This course is an advanced course which covers the full range of United States history from Colonial America to Reconstruction. The course will also cover the history of political institutions, behavior and public policy, social and economic change, democracy and international relations, as well as cultural and intellectual development. This Pre AP course provides students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to address critically problems and topics in U.S. history. Students learn to assess historical documents  and  to  weigh  the  evidence  and  interpretations  presented  in  historical scholarship. The course is designed to help prepare students for an AP track in history grades 10-12.

PREREQUISITE: Strong reading, writing, and analytical skills, Teacher recommendation, and writing sample

 

This course is a 9th  grade History class where students earn the required History credits towards  graduation.  In  this  class,  students  study the  themes  of  causality,  solidarity,

resistance, and action. Students examine how systems of power and oppression become institutionalized and are upheld over time. In addition, students learn about the ways people of color and marginalized groups (both in the US and abroad) are impacted by a legacy of colonialism and they ways that people of color, young folks, and other marginalized groups have organized movements to resist systemic oppression. Like all Ethnic  Studies   classes,  students will  hone their  Reading,  Writing,  Speaking,  and Listening skills. All students will participate in a culminating Youth Participatory Action Research Project. Students in this course are also enrolled in the 9th grade English Ethnic Studies class.

 

249      US Ethnic Studies Honors                            5hr        40wk          5cr          Honors wt This course is a 9th  grade History class where students earn the required History credits towards  graduation.  In  this  class,  students  study the  themes  of  causality,  solidarity, resistance, and action. Students examine how systems of power and oppression become institutionalized and are upheld over time. In addition, students learn about the ways people of color and marginalized groups (both in the US and abroad) are impacted by a legacy  of  colonialism  and  they  ways  that  people  of  color,  young  folks,  and  other marginalized groups have organized movements to resist systemic oppression. Like all Ethnic  Studies   classes,  students will  hone their  Reading,  Writing,  Speaking,  and Listening skills. All students will participate in a culminating Youth Participatory Action Research  Project.  Honors  students  will  be  expected  to  engage  in  outside  reading, assignments, and projects that include library and literary research. Students in this course are also enrolled in the 9th grade English Ethnic Studies class.

PREREQUISITE:  Student must be recommended by their 8th grade Ethnic Studies or

Social Studies teacher.

 

250      U.S. History II Honors                                   5hr        40wk           5cr              Honors wt This advanced course will cover United States History from Industrialization to the present.                 Students  will  continue  their  study  of  political  institutions,  public  policy, democracy,  social  and  economic  change,  foreign  policy,  as  well  as  cultural  and intellectual development. Independent reading, papers, and projects are required. PREREQUISITE:  Students must have successfully completed United States History I at a high academic standing, strong reading and writing skills.

 

253 U.S. History II 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt
257 U.S. History II 5hr 40wk 5cr Standard wt
This  course  will cover  United  States  History from  Indu strialization to  the  present.

Students  will  continue their study of  political institutions, public policy,  social  and

economic change, democracy as well as cultural and intellectual development.

 

251      U.S. History AP                                             5hr        40wk          5cr                     AP wt Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level U.S. History courses, this AP course provides students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to address critically problems and material in U.S. history. Students learn to assess historical documents and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. The course examines the discovery and

 

History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university U.S. history course. Students may earn college credit upon passing the AP Exam given by the College Board at the conclusion of the course.

 

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of other history courses at a high academic standing, strong reading and writing skills, recommendation by previous history teacher.

 

 

707      Holocaust and Human Rights                      5hr        20wk           2.5cr      Standard wt This course will explore the history and events of the Holocaust as well as selected thematic topics in Human Rights.  Students will explore memoirs, historical documents, poetry, documentary footage, novels, and other media that help illustrate the multiplicity and variety of human experience during the 20th century. Students will read analytically, think critically, and write persuasively as they explore the topics of the course.

 

262      Economics                                                       5hr        20wk          2.5cr      Standard wt

This course explores how individuals, government and financial institutions, and society make choices under conditions of scarce (limited) resources. Key elements include the role of people as consumers, workers, investors, and voters. Other key topics include the study of scarcity, supply and demand, market structures, money, and trade.

PREREQUISITE: Good reading ability and successful completion of Algebra I

.

263      World Religions                                              5hr        20wk          2.5cr      Standard wt An  introduction  to  twelve  major  religions  practiced  around  the  world.  The  course provides an overview of the purpose, definition, and commonalities of all religion. Each topic would include historical and geographic background as well as major tenets and practices. A major goal is to create an understanding, appreciation, and tolerance for religious differences.

 

264      Contemporary Issues                                     5hr        20wk          2.5cr      Standard wt

A current events course with content to be dictated, by some degree, to events taking place in the world. Emphasis will be placed on identifying economic, social, and political issues and problem solving. Units include: the world since 9/11; the challenges of climate change; sustainability of population growth; and problems of democracy in the information age.

 

206      History of Holyoke                                         5hr        20wk          2.5cr      Standard wt The Paper City has a relatively short, but incredibly diverse history. This class will trace the roots of Holyoke from it pre-history geography and inhabitants; through its birth in the  Industrial  Revolution;  and  its  decline  in  a  post-industrial  economy.  A  special emphasis will be placed on the many ethnic groups which have arrived, thrived, and succeeded ranging from the Irish through the Germans, French, Polish, Jewish, African- American to the Puerto Ricans.

 

245      History of War                                               2.5hr    20wk          2.5cr      Standard wt

The History of War will focus on the causes of war from a global perspective and examine the use of power over less powerful nations, regions, and groups of people to achieve political and philosophical agendas.  It will strive to have students find answers to the following essential questions:

 

  1. How do people interact with systems of power?
  2. Why do nations use war?
  3. What are the impacts of war on society and technology?
  4. When in history has war changed the path of efforts on a global scale?
  5. Final Question: Is there such a thing as a “just war”?

Students will research the repeating themes of social, economic and political agendas that lead to war. This includes the societal impact on the global scale, individual nations, as well as local ideologies. Other themes include not only the ability to wage war, but how it impacts the economy and society as a whole. A wide range of past and more recent conflicts will be explored.

Preference will be given to juniors and seniors.

 

265       Intro to Ethnic Studies                              5hr            20wk            2.5cr      Standard wt

The Ethnic Studies elective is a semester long course. This course is open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have not taken 9th or 10th grade Ethnic Studies at HHS. In the Ethnic Studies elective, we will learn about the origins of Ethnic Studies as both a course and pedagogy rooted in the Civil Rights Movement. We will examine the trajectory and struggle for Ethnic Studies classes from 1968 to the present to understand why Ethnic Studies courses matter. More specifically, we will make connections to why Ethnic Studies is important in HPS. In addition to the teacher— students, guest speakers from the community, and professors from the five colleges will present on relevant topics.

 

SPECIAL EDUCATION

 

 

There are three different programs for students based on their Individualized Education Plan. Schedules will vary depending on the individual needs and the program the student is placed in. Parents should speak with the school SETL to understand more about the program their student will be enrolled in.

 

Functional Academics Program

 

 

Functional Academics Program is a specialized, substantially separate, moderate needs special education program.  Students in the Functional Academics program are typically identified as having a primary intellectual impairment.  The program focuses on the development of academic and daily living skills through provision of significantly modified curriculum, teaching methodology/delivery of instruction and performance criteria.  Most students also receive services through a speech/language pathologist, occupational therapist or physical therapist.

The Functional Academics program serves students in grades 9-12 and is staffed according to a 12:3 student to staff ratio which includes:

  • One special education teacher with a moderate special education certification, and
  • Two special education paraprofessionals

 

 

Students receiving services in the Functional Academic program must meet entrance criteria in order to be placed in the program.  Student groupings are based on age, academic level and adaptive skills. The program schedule includes academic classes which are 49 minutes as well as a 45 minute life skills block. Students also participate in specials/elective classes with same age peers.

 

 

 

Reaching Individual Self-Efficacy (RISE) Program

 

 

The RISE Program is a highly specialized, substantially separate, severe needs special education program. Students in the RISE program may have one or more disabilities which result in a need for multiple specialized services which do not include medical support. The program provides significantly modified curriculum, teaching methodology/delivery of instruction, and performance criteria to students requiring academic and adaptive skills development.  A primary focus of this program is development of knowledge and skills that support independent access to, and functioning across, settings. Most students also receive related services from a Speech/Language Pathologist, Occupational Therapist, Physical Therapist, Assistive Technology and/or Adaptive Physical Education Teacher.

 

 

The Rise program is staffed according to a 12:4 student to staff ratio, which includes:

 

  • One special education teacher with a severe special education certification, and
  • Up to three special education paraprofessionals

 

Students receiving services in the RISE program must meet placement criteria) in order to be placed in the program.  Student groupings are based on age, academic level and adaptive skills. English and Math academic blocks range between 60 and 90 minutes and are broken into 15 to 20 minute small, rotating, instructional groups at a 3:1 student staff ratio. Academic groups focus on students IEP goals and benchmarks as well as adaptive skills development. Adaptive skills development areas include: language and literacy, money, time, number concepts, self-direction, and the ability to follow rules.  A 60-minute

 

social skills/life skills block is also built into to the day. The social skills block can have a variety of focuses including but not limited to; interpersonal skills, social responsibility, self-esteem, gullibility, naïveté (i.e., wariness), social problem solving, anti-bullying/self-advocacy, the ability to follow rules/obey laws and to avoid being victimized, activities of daily living (personal care), occupational

skills, healthcare, travel/transportation, schedules/routines, safety, use of money, and use of the telephone. All students are able to participate in non-academic classes (Unified Arts- Music, Physical Education, Art, Computers, Health etc.) and lunch with similar age peers. In addition, students in the RISE program at Holyoke High School are provided vocational opportunities and training within the school including, but not limited to, cooking, maintenance duties, mail delivery, and clerical support.

 

Students with Health Impairments & Needs of Exception (SHINE) Program

 

 

The SHINE Program is a highly specialized, substantially separate, severe needs, special education program.  Students in the SHINE program may have one or more disabilities which result in a need for multiple specialized services including medical support, and require a significant degree of program coordination and service.  Most students are in need of physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, vision therapy, assistive augmentative communication services, and/or music/art therapy on a daily to weekly basis to ensure they do not regress or demonstrate a loss in physical ability.  Further, students in the SHINE program generally require nursing and medical support due to health issues

including, but not limited to: G/J tubes, legal blindness, inability to independently ambulate, loss of speech abilities, brain damage, tracheotomies/respiratory issues, seizure disorders and other various medical disorders.  As such, SHINE students require moderate to maximum assistance for any and all personal

care, feeding, academic work and communication.  Many use voice-output devices for communication purposes and activation switches to operate various toys and appliances.

 

Program activities are designed to access a wide variety of sensory responses through auditory, visual, tactile, proprioceptive, vestibular, and olfactory stimulation. The program intention is to enhance the development of fine and gross motor skills, encourage students to communicate at their own level, and to offer opportunities for socializing with staff and peers.

 

The SHINE program allows students to remain in school up to the age of 22.  The program is staffed according to a 12:6 student to staff ratio, which includes:

 

  • One special education teacher with a severe special education certification, and
  • Up to five special education paraprofessionals

 

Students receiving services in the SHINE program must meet entrance criteria in order to be placed in the program.  Students are grouped based on their age, academic level and adaptive skills. English and Math academic blocks range between 60 and 90 minutes and are broken into 15 to 20 minute small, rotating, instructional groups at a 3:1 student staff ratio. Academic groups focus on students IEP goals and benchmarks as well as adaptive skills. Adaptive skills focused on during small groups include but are not limited to; language and literacy, money, time, number concepts, self-direction, and the ability to follow rules.  A 60-minute social skills/life skills block is also built into to the day. The social skills block can have a variety of focuses including but not limited to; interpersonal skills, social responsibility, self- esteem, gullibility, naïveté (i.e., wariness), social problem solving, anti-bullying/self advocacy, the ability to follow rules/obey laws and to avoid being victimized, activities of daily living (personal care), occupational skills, healthcare, travel/transportation, schedules/routines, safety, use of money, and use of the telephone. All students are able to participate in non-academic classes (Unified Arts- Music, Physical Education, Art, Computers, Health etc.) and lunch/recess with similar age peers.  Students in this program complete the MCAS-Alternate Assessment at the “access skill” level.

 

VISUAL ARTS DEPARTMENT

 

The Visual Arts Department offers instruction in fine arts, commercial art, and hand crafts to students who wish to develop their own skills and interests or to explore career options in the field of art.  All courses except Art 880 are offered on a 20 week basis.  Students may select these courses as their schedule and personal needs demand.

 

850      Design I                                                          5hr       20wk       2.5cr          Standard wt This course offers a basic foundation course in two and three dimensional design. Topics included are: elements and principles of design, color study, three-dimensional design in clay and paper. Also included is a survey of art history. (Fall only)

 

851      Design II                                                        5hr       20wk       2.5cr          Standard wt This course places an emphasis on crafts including work in clay, textiles, printmaking, etc. Art history is included.  (Spring only).

PREREQUISITE: Design I 850

 

852      Design III                                                        5hr        20wk        2.5cr           Standard wt This course extends Design II 851 with emphasis on more mature work.  (Spring only) PREREQUISITE: Design II 851

 

860      Drawing & Painting I                                    5hr        20wk        2.5cr           Standard wt This course offers a basic foundation course in drawing and painting, including drawing people, perspective, still life and landscapes. Also included is a survey of art history. (Spring only)

 

861      Drawing & Painting II                                 5hr       20wk       2.5cr          Standard wt This course reinforces drawing and painting skills with emphasis on fine arts aspects. Art history included. (Fall only)

PREREQUISITE: Drawing and Painting I 860

 

862      Drawing & Painting III                                5hr       20wk       2.5cr          Standard wt This course extends Drawing and Painting I 860 with emphasis on more mature work. (Fall only)

PREREQUISITE: Drawing and Painting II 861

 

870 Art Portfolio Fall 5hr 20wk 2.5cr Standard wt
871 Art Portfolio Spring 5hr 20wk 2.5cr Standard wt

This course offers more advanced art students an opportunity to develop skills in an area

of personal interest. Students work independently under supervision. (Fall or Spring)

PREREQUISITE:   Must have completed Design II 851 and Drawing and Painting II

  1. Art Portfolio Development 870 or Art Portfolio Development 871 may be taken more than once. Consent of instructor and Department head required.

 

WORLD LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT

 

The study of foreign languages expands a person’s perspectives and opportunities, and increases knowledge of one’s own language and culture.  World developments in political, social, and business spheres have the knowledge of another language a critical skill that is highly prized by employers.

 

Any language may be begun in any grade; however, since language development is a gradual and continual process, it is highly recommended that a student continue with the language chosen for the longest sequence possible.  Students with an aptitude and interest for languages are encouraged to begin a second language while continuing the first.  Students, particularly those planning a career involving foreign languages, are also encouraged to elect appropriate courses in the Social Studies Department to give them added insights into the history and culture of other countries.

 

The courses in modern languages (French and Spanish) seek to develop in students, basic communicative competence, a solid foundation for continued language development and an increased knowledge of the history, culture and literature of other countries. The option to elect either the standard program or the advanced program at upper levels permits students to continue with a chosen language at a pace commensurate with interest and ability.

 

The Latin program places students in close contact with a civilization that provides them with examples of patriotism, a love of justice, devotion to family, and a sense of duty and morality.  Serving as a link between the ancient and modern worlds, the study of Latin places much of man’s acquired knowledge at the student’s disposal.  In addition it helps to develop a base for excellence in English, a sound knowledge of language structure, and an appreciation of the best in literary effort.

 

500      French I                                                           5hr       40wk          5cr           Standard wt This course develops systematically and progressively the student’s ability in the four language skills: listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis is placed on proper pronunciation and international patterns, basic grammatical structure

and vocabulary development. Cultural aspects of the French speaking world will be presented throughout the year. Communicative activities will be done as well as tape activities in the language lab.

 

505      French II                                                        5hr         40wk         5cr           Standard wt This course reviews and continues the development of fundamental skills, grammar structures and vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on strengthening reading and writing

skills while further developing skills in listening comprehension and speaking. Increasing the student’s ability to express him or herself in French is also stressed. Discussions of French culture and life in French speaking countries are continually integrated into the course through readings, videos and music. The continued use of the native language topics will familiarize the student with the cadence of spoken French. PREREQUISITE: Satisfactory completion of French I 500. A ‘C’ average or better is recommended.

 

510      French III                                                       5hr      40wk          5cr          Standard wt This course develops the student’s ability to read easily and comprehend directly using literary selections.  Emphasis is placed on increasing students’ control of vocabulary, idioms and basic grammatical structures.  Students continue to become familiar with the

 

culture    and    traditions   of    French-speaking    countries.        Students’   listening    and comprehension skills are enhanced through a variety of conversational exercises. PREREQUISITE:   Satisfactory completion of French II 505.   A ‘C’ average or better recommended.

 

511      French III Honors                                          5hr        40wk          5cr         Honors wt The objectives for this course are the same as for standard French III and in addition provide a quickly paced and intensive language experience involving additional content, material and practice for students with high interest and/or ability in the language. This course contains all material of standard French III Course plus: additional vocabulary development, additional readings in supplementary texts, discussions, composition/essay work, aural/oral work in language lab, additional grammatical concepts, including use of the subjunctive. French culture continues to be woven throughout the course through videos, readings, music and the like.

PREREQUISITE: Satisfactory completion of French II with a “C or better” recommended.

 

521      French lV Honors                                           5hr        40wk          5cr              Honors wt The objectives are the same for this course as for standard French IV, and, in addition, provide a quickly paced and intensive language experience involving additional content, material, and practice for students with high interest and/or ability in the language. This course contains all material of the standard French IV course plus: additional vocabulary development, additional readings including classic and contemporary literature,

additional composition work, original and critical, additional aural/oral work, oral presentations by students, and more developed French history and culture. PREREQUISITE: Satisfactory completion of French 510 III or French III Honors 512. A ‘B’ average or better recommended.

 

525      Spanish I                                                         5hr        40wk         5cr            Standardwt This course is for students new to Spanish or who have taken middle school Spanish but are not yet ready for Spanish 2. This course acquaints students with the language and culture of the Spanish-speaking world, emphasizing effective oral and written skills, grammar, vocabulary and global awareness. Topics include geography, self, school, family, leisure activities, clothing, weather and shopping.

 

523     Spanish for Native Speakers I           5hr     40wk               5cr       Standard wt

This course is for students whose home language is Spanish.  This course focuses on the development of communicative competence in reading, writing, speaking and listening and viewing, as well as on understanding Hispanic cultures.  In addition to building vocabulary, learning basic rules and terminology of grammar, the course introduces the students to the geography and culture of the Spanish speaking world.  This course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Open to 9th grade students who have successfully completed a placement test.

 

527      Spanish II                                                       5hr      40wk               5cr         Standard wt

This course reinforces the vocabulary, grammatical structures and cultural themes presented

in Spanish I and develops more complex structures necessary for continuing communication, according to the state and national standards. This course includes a novel and interactive

on-line resources to develop global and cultural themes. Additional topics include health, food, daily routines and communication in past, present and simple future time frames. PREREQUISITE: Spanish I; An average grade of “C” or TEACHER RECOMMENDATION.

 

524      Spanish for Native Speakers II         5hr     40wk               5cr       Standard wt

This course is for Spanish speakers who have completed Spanish Native Speakers I and II. The course focuses on teaching language through literature. It exposes the students to works of literary significance and social, cultural and historical issues of the Spanish speaking world. The course continues to stress reading, writing and appropriate language usage. This course prepares students for the AP Spanish Language and Culture course or the AP Spanish Literature At the end of the course, students have the option of taking the AP Spanish Language and Culture or the AP Spanish Literature and Culture course. This course is conducted in Spanish.

PREREQUISITE:  A  grade  of  C  or  better  in  SNS  II  and/or  department  chair approval.

 

529      Spanish III                                                     5hr        40wk          5cr           Standard wt The purpose of Spanish III is: 1) to develop oral and written communication skills through past, future and conditional narratives 2) to develop cultural and global awareness, while attentive to international perspectives and 3) to reinforce reading and listening comprehension skills through on-line resources , short stories, film, poetry, music lyrics and print media. PREREQUISITE: Spanish II 527 or Spanish for Native Speakers I.

TEACHER RECOMMENDATION

 

531      Spanish III Honors                                         5hr        40wk          5cr               Honors wt This course covers the same material as Spanish III standard, but in more depth. The class will be conducted almost entirely in Spanish. Students are expected to acquire detailed knowledge of all essential elements of language structure and grammar. Additional vocabulary development, additional readings in supplementary readers, composition/essay work, additional aural/work, oral presentations by students, some projects both individual and group as well as some work in the cultural areas of study.

OPEN TO SOPHOMORES, JUNIORS AND SENIORS

PREREQUISITE: SPANISH II; Spanish for Native Speakers I. TEACHER RECOMMENDATION ONLY

 

532      Spanish IV                                                     5hr        40wk          5cr           Standard wt This course is designed for students who have successfully completed three years of Spanish. A good command of basic language skills and an ability to handle with ease the basic structures of Spanish is essential. All four language skills, speaking, listening, reading and writing, continue to develop with emphasis on the problematic areas in grammar and advanced grammatical structures. An extensive study of the verb tenses is presented. Class is conducted in Spanish.

PREREQUISITE: Satisfactory completion of Spanish III 529 or Spanish III Honors

 

535      AP Spanish Literature and Culture             5hr        40wk          5cr                    AP wt This course is designed for students who have successfully completed three or four years of Spanish. The AP Spanish Literature program is designed to prepare students to understand lectures in Spanish and to participate actively in literary discussions in Spanish. It is based on a

required reading list from the College Board. The works on the list are of literary significance and represent various historical periods, literary movements, genres, geographic areas, and population groups within the Spanish-speaking world. Students will be required to write literary analysis papers throughout the course. The course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Exam and is conducted in Spanish.

 

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of AP Spanish Language and Culture course

and/or teacher recommendation. Open to seniors only. This course will run on an every other year rotation.

 

541      AP Spanish Language and Culture              5cr        40wk          5cr                     AP wt AP Spanish Language is a five credit academic course at HHS. It is an advanced level course for students who have completed advanced Spanish and who are interested in learning the Spanish language more in depth. The content of the course is aligned with

the College Board AP Spanish Language course description. Every effort is made by the teacher to use additional resources and online AP resources. An AP Exam review is included within the course in order to prepare students for the AP Exam.

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Spanish for Native Speakers and/or Spanish III/IV Honors with permission of the Department Chair. An average of ‘B’ or better is highly recommended.

 

575      Latin I                                                             5hr        40wk          5cr          Standard wt Latin 1 is a beginning language course designed as an introduction to the ancient Romans and their language. Emphasis is placed on acquiring the skills needed to read elementary Latin texts. The influence of Roman civilization on modern society is examined through a study of Roman mythology, culture, history and archaeology. In addition, students expand their English vocabularies through a study of Latin root words.

 

 

576      Latin II                                                           5hr        40wk          5cr           Standard wt In Latin 2, students review the basic language principles studied in Latin 1 and master language skills not studied previously. Emphasis is placed on acquiring the skills needed to read intermediate Latin texts. Further study of Roman civilization and culture through an examination of adapted readings in Latin, increases the students’ awareness of the debt of western civilization to ancient Greece and Rome. Students continue to develop their English vocabulary through a study of Latin roots.

PREREQUISITE: Satisfactory completion of Latin I 575.

 

581      Latin Prose Honors                                        5hr        40wk          5cr              Honors wt This course begins with a systematic review of the fundamentals of Latin grammar and syntax.    The readings are designed to cover a wide range of Roman prose writers. Selections from Caesar, Cicero and Pliny lead to a deeper understanding and broader perspective of Roman culture.  Students will read selections from Cicero’s orations and develop an understanding of Roman rhetoric and its influence in politics. PREREQUISITE:   Satisfactory completion of Latin II 576.   A ‘B’ average or better recommended.

 

587      Latin Poetry Honors                                      5hr        40wk          5cr              Honors wt Students will read, analyze and discuss the poetry of Catullus, Horace and Vergil. The class will complete advanced study in the scansion and rhetorical devices of Latin poetry, as well as expand vocabulary and grammatical understanding. The course will also set

the poems in the context of the historical and social events in Rome that inspired them as well as explore the Greek precedents for the genre of lyric and epic poetry. PREREQUISITE: Satisfactory completion of Latin II 576. A ‘B’ average or better recommended.

 

Dual Enrollment at HHS

 

Dual Enrollment classes are college classes that high school students can take. Students get both high school and college credit for these courses.

 

Taking a Dual Enrollment class is a great way to get a taste of what college classes are like. Students who take these classes are often more prepared to take on what college has to offer.

 

Who is eligible to take Dual Enrollment classes?

  • Students must be juniors or seniors in high school
  • Students must meet any other requirements of the college they plan to take a class at.
  • Most colleges require a minimum grade point average:
  • Holyoke Community College (HCC): Minimum 2.5 GPA*
  • Springfield Technical Community College: Minimum 2.0 GPA
  • UMASS Amherst: 3.2 GPA for courses taken at UMASS; NO minimum GPA for UMASS

classes offered at HHS

  • Westfield State University: 2.5 GPA*

*These colleges may admit students who have between a 2.0 and a 2.5 GPA if the student is recommended by the guidance counselor.

 

HHS currently has relationships with HCC, STCC, UMASS and Westfield State and our students may apply to take a Dual Enrollment class at any of these colleges. If you wish to take a class at a different college or university, you must apply directly with that college or university.

 

Applying:

  • Deadlines vary by college and you should check with the college or your guidance counselor to have exact deadlines.
  • Application deadlines for fall semester is usually in late June
  • Application for spring semester is usually in early December
  • Application for summer term is usually in early May
  • Applications for HCC and STCC can be found on their websites (see below). The guidance office has applications for other colleges. Applications require the signature of the parent/guardian and the guidance counselor. An official transcript must be sent with the application.
  • Apply early to guarantee your spot!

 

How much will this cost?

  • Most dual enrollment classes are FREE to you! The colleges have funding that covers the cost of your class!*
  • HCC asks that all students fill out a financial aid application called the FAFSA (www.fafsa.ed.gov) in order to guarantee their spot in the class.
  • Dual Enrollment students are responsible for purchasing the books for their class unless otherwise instructed. Exceptions:
  • HCC Dual Enrollment students who complete a FAFSA may receive a voucher to pay for their book
  • Books may be covered by HHS or by the college if the class is offered at Holyoke High.
  • If buying a book is an obstacle for you, speak with the college that you are taking a class with. They will work with students to help as much as possible.

 

  • Transportation to and from the college is the responsibility of the student. HCC and STCC will provide Dual Enrollment students with bus passes if needed.

*UMASS Amherst typically charges $20 per class

 

Students who take a Dual Enrollment class may have their HHS schedule adjusted if this is possible. It is essential that the student speak with their guidance counselor as soon as he or she applies for a Dual Enrollment class in order to understand how the HHS schedule must be adjusted.

 

More information:

STCC Dual Enrollment programs:  http://www.stcc.edu/collegenow/

HCC Dual Enrollment programs:  http://www.hcc.edu/admission/dual-enrollment

Westfield State University-See your guidance counselor

UMASS Amherst-See your guidance counselor

 

 

 

 

UMASS:

 

Fall 2017

Courses offered 2017-2018

 

 

UMASS Intro to Psychology: Overview of the field. The natural and social science sub-areas of psychology; includes biological psychology, cognitive psychology, social psychology, developmental psychology, and clinical psychology. Relating research and theories to contemporary issues and problems in day-to-day life. Tuesdays & Thursdays 4-5:15 at UMASS Amherst

 

UMASS World Politics: Introduction to the principles and practices of international relations in the political, military, economic, and environmental realms. Study of the development of the contemporary system to explore the effects of the structure of the international system, the institutions through which states conduct their relations, and domestic characteristics on the relations among states. Tuesdays & Thursdays 4-5:15 at UMASS Amherst

 

Spring 2018

 

UMASS Into to Sociology: Introduction to sociology.  Theory, methods, and approaches to the study of society.  The use of several key sociological perspectives such as culture, social class, social psychology, and organizational power to analyze contemporary social issues. 4-5:15 at UMASS Amherst (days TBD)

 

UMASS Intro to Psychology: Overview of the field. The natural and social science sub-areas of psychology; includes biological psychology, cognitive psychology, social psychology, developmental psychology, and clinical psychology. Relating research and theories to contemporary issues and problems in day-to-day life. 4-5:15 at UMASS Amherst (days TBD)

 

HCC:

 

Apply for Dual Enrollment ASAP. Once you have applied, an HCC dual enrollment advisor will meet with you to discuss your class options.

 

STCC:

 

See the STCC College Now website for course offerings:  http://www.stcc.edu/collegenow/

 

Westfield State:

 

Check this website for Fall 2017 or Spring 2018 offering. Website will be updated once offering come out. Talk to your guidance counselor about courses offered at HHS by Westfield State:

 

http://www.westfield.ma.edu/academics/continuing-education-massachusetts/current-upcoming-course- offerings

 

 

 

 

 

Internships at HHS

 

 

 

Holyoke High School offers 11th  and 12th  students the opportunity to participate in internships with businesses, companies, organizations and unions in order to gain real life experience. This experiential learning enhances student knowledge about careers of interest and gives students an advantage when seeking employment.

 

Details:

  • A student can gain up to 2.5 credits per semester for an internship.
  • Students must work a minimum of 5 hours per week at their internship.
  • Students must track hours worked
  • Students complete a reflection each marking period
  • Internship supervisors evaluate student progress
  • Students will be awarded a PASS for satisfactory work and growth or a FAIL for unsatisfactory work and a lack of growth

 

How do I obtain an internship?

  • If you know of a business or organization or other site that is related to your field of interest, contact the site to ask if they take high school interns.
  • If you are not sure where to start, make an appointment with your guidance counselor or with a

teacher and ask for recommendations about possible internships sites.

  • Once you have secured a work site, obtain an internship contract from the College & Career Readiness coordinator at HHS. This form should be filled out by the student and the internship supervisor.
  • The College & Career Readiness Coordinator will communicate with the site and oversee the internship
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