Programs of Study and Course Catalog

2018-2019 Programs of Study and Course Handbook (for High School Students)

 

 Holyoke High School’s Vision Statement

 

Holyoke High School’s Vision is to ensure that all students are provided the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to graduate prepared to pursue higher education without remediation and/or a rewarding career and function as responsible citizens in a diverse society.  The successful pursuit of our vision requires the active participation and cooperation of students, faculty, parents/guardians and the community at large.


A Message from the Executive Principal

 

Dear Students and Families,

 

This program of studies comes from the hard work of innumerable teachers and educators, men and women deeply committed to creating opportunities, challenges and supports designed to help each one of our students become their very best self.   Now it is your responsibility to consider carefully the options available and to make decisions based on goals that are equal parts ambitious and realistic.  Look for places to stretch who you are as a learner, be it moving into honors or AP courses or taking arts classes for the first time.   Keep in the front of your mind the thought that at the end of the 18-19 year you will want to look back on your record and have no regrets.

 

I want to call special attention to some new policies for the 18-19 school year.  Be sure to review our Honors/Advanced Placement policy, our PE Waiver policy [see the course entitled “Physical Education Experience”], our Early College Program, and our Linked Learning pathways.

 

Finally, a reminder that while we cannot guarantee every course request, we encourage you to have as strong an end to this year as is possible.  As a school leader I have always been committed to doing every possible thing I can to honor student effort; for some that is a record of all A’s while for others that is a terrible 1st semester followed by a 2nd semester marked by a significant turnaround in effort and performance.

 

!Si, se puede!

 

Dr. Mahoney

 


THIS DOCUMENT IS AVAILABLE AT THE GUIDANCE OFFICE.

 

 Table of Contents

 

Holyoke High School Academic Policies
Graduate Profile p. 4
Student Course Selection Policy p. 5
Access to Equal Educaitonal Opportunity p. 5
Graduation Policy p. 6
MASSCore p. 7
Promotion Policy p. 8
Honors and Advanced Placement Enrollment Criteria p. 8
Course Placement p. 8
Course Withdrawal / Add Regulations p. 9
Grading Systems – Weighted Values p. 10
Transfer Students p. 11
Office Hours p. 11
Holyoke High School Programs of Study p. 12
Freshman Academy – North Campus p. 13
Freshman Academy – South Campus p. 14
Newcomer Academy p. 15
Community and Global Studies Academy p. 16
Medical Life Sciences Academy p. 17
Performing and Media Arts Academy p. 18
Technology, Engineering and Design Academy p. 19
Career Technical Education Programming p. 20
       Academy Alignment p. 21
Course Catalog by Academic Departments p. 22
Arts p. 23
Career Technical Education p. 29
English p. 50
English Language Development p. 57
Mathematics and Computer Science p. 62
Physical Education and Wellness p. 67
Science p. 69
Social Studies p. 75
Special Education p. 83
World Language p. 99
Dual Enrollment p. 104
Early College p. 106
Courses in development for 2019-2020 p. 110



Holyoke High School Graduate Profile

HHS seeks to create graduates who are effective communicators, critical thinkers, engaged and productive community members and mindful individuals.  This shared vision for our graduates was created through interactions with students, staff, administrators, family members, community representatives, university partners and business leaders.  Together we define a vision of the HHS graduate by identifying specific success indicators within each component:

 

Communicators
 

●        Access, interpret and evaluate various sources of information.

●        Present and understand varied perspectives and points of view with clarity and precision.

●        Proficiently convey and share ideas both formally and informally through the appropriate medium while considering the target audience.

●        Use multiple languages, including academic specific and world languages, in writing, reading and speaking.

Critical Thinkers
 

●        Demonstrate mental flexibility and use knowledge and skills to independently adapt to challenges.

●        Analyze data and text critically, use analysis to inform decision making and draw conclusions competently.

●        Use technology appropriately and ethically to solve problems and to create solutions.

●        Reflect on process and product and make appropriate adjustments.

 

Engaged and Productive Community Members
 

●        Make authentic connections between what they have learned and the larger world context.

●        Respect, embrace and cultivate diversity.

●        Model leadership through motivating, being of service and collaborating with others.

●        Demonstrate the ability to create high quality products through working effectively in teams.

 

Mindful Individuals
 

●        Demonstrate respect and care for self and others.

●        Professional, principled and punctual.

●        Persevere through challenges, appropriately resolves conflicts and demonstrate a growth mindset.

●        Set goals and take responsibility for personal and academic decisions.

 

 

Student Course Selection Policy

The outline of offerings in this course selection guide represents a comprehensive list of courses which are expected to be available.  The goal of course selection is to prepare an educational program which will empower all students to make choices and meet the challenges of the 21st century.  Students will work with guidance counselors to select their courses for the 2018-209 school year.  Some courses listed may not actually be offered due to factors determined by appropriate enrollment or the availability of certified teachers.

 

  1. To help with preliminary decisions, classroom teachers will discuss options of course sequence and levels within their departments.
  2. Students meet with counselors in large groups to discuss curriculum requirements and recommendations.
  3. Students and parents should review the course selection guide to select appropriate classes and make their selections.
  4. The guidance counselors will begin the actual course selections with individual students. A Course Selection Form containing a duplicate list of the courses chosen for the upcoming year will be completed.  It should be signed by a parent and returned to their guidance counselor after the student’s courses have been selected.  If the parents do not agree with the selection, they should indicate their preferences on the Course Selection Form.  This form should be returned by the student to the guidance counselor immediately in order that course changes can be made.  The guidance counselor will proceed with the schedule without a parent signature form, if necessary.
  5. Early in June, a course verification List will be generated for each student. This verification sheet constitutes the final opportunity to make course changes.  After this point, student schedules are considered final except for administrative adjustments, course failures, or failure to meet prerequisites.
  6. The school uses the course selection requests to plan a master schedule, hire teachers, and purchase textbooks for the 2018-2019 school year.
  7. Students and parents are advised that once the new school year has begun, all regulations concerning withdrawal from a course will be in effect. (See Course Withdrawal / Add Regulations).

 

Access to Equal Educational Opportunity

In compliance with Chapter 622 of the Acts of l971, and Title IX, all courses of study offered at Holyoke High School are open and available to all students without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin or sexual orientation.  Any suspected failure to abide by the provisions of federal and state statutes providing for equal opportunity should be reported to the Executive Principal.

 

Graduation Policy

These Holyoke Public Schools graduation requirements represent the academic minimum that all students must successfully complete in order to graduate from Holyoke High School.  All students are encouraged to meet or pass the MassCore recommended program of study where their program and needs make it possible.

 

Holyoke High School North & South Graduation Requirements
1 year of instruction = 1 unit

1 unit = 5 credits

Graduation Requirement Units Credits
Minimum number of units (credits)

 

24 units 120 credits
Those 24 units (120 credits) must include:
English* 4 units 20 credits
Math 3 units 15 credits
Science 3 units 15 credits
Social Studies 3 units 15 credits (including 5 credits of US History)
Electives** 11 units 55 credits

 

Graduation Requirements – Additional Notes

MCAS – in addition to the units above, to earn a diploma, students must pass the MCAS exams required by state law (ELA, Math, Science)

 

Physical Education (PE) – Students must complete a semester-long PE course each year.   Students can waive this requirement by completing an approved alternative to the course, including but not limited to school-sponsored athletics and community-based competitive athletics not offered by HHS.

 

*English as a Second Language (ESL) – ESL Newcomer and ESL Beginning Literature and Composition courses (for students at early stages of learning English) will count as English credit.  Other ESL courses count as elective credit.

 

**Electives –  An essential difference between the North and South campus is that students on the South campus must complete 10 units (9th and 10th grade) and 15 units (11th and 12th grade) in the CTE program, limiting the choices they have for electives.   Students on the North campus are scheduled to meet and surpass the MassCore recommendations (below).

 

 

 

MassCore 

MassCore is the recommended program of study that Massachusetts high school students need in order to be better prepared for college and a career.  Developed by a statewide advisory group from the K-12, higher education and business sector, MassCore is required for admission to state universities and colleges.

 

MassCore Program of Study
English/ Language Arts 4 Units*
Mathematics 4 Units – Including the completion of Algebra II or completion of the Integrated Math equivalent. All students are recommended to take a math course during their senior year.
Science 3 Units of lab-based science – Coursework taken in technology/engineering may count for MassCore science credit. Note: In June 2012, the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education (BHE) revised its admission standards to count technology/engineering coursework based on academic standards and taken for science credit as meeting the science admissions requirement.
History/ Social Science 3 Units – Including US History
Foreign Language** 2 Units – Of the same language
Physical Education As required by law – State law (M.G.L. c. 71,s. 3) states: “Physical education shall be taught as a required subject in all grades for all students.” Health can be integrated into Physical Education, science, or taught as a stand-alone course.
The Arts** 1 Unit
Additional Core Courses 5 Units – Business Education, Career and Technical Education (CTE), Health, Technology or any of the subjects above. Note: Most students majoring in CTE will take more than 5 units in a CTE program of study.
22 Units – Is a minimum that students should take in high school

 

MassCore – Additional Notes

*A unit represents a full academic year of study or its equivalent in a subject that covers all the standards contained in a specific Curriculum Framework.

 

** Students enrolled in a state-approved Career and Technical Education program of studies have the option of opting out of Foreign Language and Art and still fulfill MassCore.

Promotion Policy

In general, students will be promoted with their entering cohort.

  • 1st year in HS – 9th grade/Freshman
  • 2nd year in HS – 10th grade/Sophomore
  • 3rd year in HS – 11th grade/Junior
  • 4th year in HS – 12th grade/Seniors

 

Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior status does NOT indicate on track progress towards graduation; rather it indicates how many years a student has been in high school.  Progress towards graduation is determined by completing graduation requirements (passing courses/earning credits and passing MCAS exams).  Students who fail one or more courses may be promoted with their class, but they must make up those course credits in the following years.

 

Honors and Advanced Placement Course Enrollment Criteria

HHS is committed to pushing and supporting every student to challenge themselves in every way.  Academically,  it is the responsibility of educators to encourage students to move beyond their comfort zones and to step up to the challenges presented by the pace and volume of work and assessment that distinguishes honors and AP courses from college prep courses.

 

With this in mind all students in grades 8-11 will be able to self-select honors and AP courses, and will be automatically scheduled for those selections should they meet the following minimum criteria:

 

  • Attendance rate of 95% or better (fewer than nine absences)

** For 2018-2019 academic year only, rising 9th graders 92% or better (fewer than 14 absences) in eighth grade

  • A disciplinary record of no suspensions for the current year.
  • A course grade of B- or better in the preceding grade level course

 

Where students’ performance does not meet the minimum criteria, they can earn a waiver by completing a waiver form that asks for the following:

 

  • A self-evaluation of their current strengths and weaknesses of their academic behaviors
  • A set of SMART goals for the coming year
  • If the student has been suspended in the current year, a statement from a member of the administrative team that supports the student’s ability and commitment to adhering to productive and positive academic behavior.

 

NOTE:  If a student enrolled in an Advanced Placement course does not take the Advanced Placement examination, he/she/they will earn credit and weighted gradepoint average for the course at the honors level.

 

Course Placement

A student may accelerate their course sequence (skip a year) if she/he/they take and  pass the previous course’s end of year exam with 80% or higher proficiency.  Requests for placement exams are to be made with the counselor during course registration.

Course Withdrawal / Add Regulations

Students and parents should exercise extreme care throughout the course selection process.  All students are encouraged to involve their parents in the scheduling process.  We will make every effort to communicate the courses students select to parents, but it is our expectation students will be communicating with parents both prior to and after the course selection meeting with their guidance counselors.  Teacher schedules, the hiring of teachers, the number of sections, section sizes, and the ordering of textbooks and supplies are determined by initial student course selection and registration.  It becomes difficult to change student schedules once classes are set, so parents and students should carefully review course requests, and parents should sign the registration sheet indicating approval of students’ choices.  Students will be encouraged to have the schedule signed by their parent, but we will proceed without a parent’s signature, if needed.

 

While an elective course may be requested, a class can only be included in the master schedule if there is sufficient enrollment to justify a teaching assignment.  Also, if a particular course, in only taught during a specific period, there is a possibility that there will be a conflict with other requested courses.  Great care taken when crafting the master schedule to eliminate as many conflicts as possible, but courses such as Advanced Placement, band, choir, etc. often are available in only one or two periods during the school day and conflicts do occur.  It is critical that students list alternate elective choices and realize there is a possibility that they may have to choose between classes.

 

Beginning July 1st, all requests for schedule changes must be approved by the principal.  Requests must be submitted in writing to the guidance counselor via email or data-stamped by Holyoke High school main office staff.  Students will receive their schedule for the 2018-2019 school year on the first day of school, however a list of selected courses will be given before students leave for summer vacation.

 

After the start of the year, unless there is a scheduling conflict, there will be no changes in program except (please note 1-3 below are initiated by the school):

 

  1. During the first quarter of the school year, a change in academic level or to balance classes within a department may be made.
  2. A change to correct an error in a schedule may be made.
  3. A recommendation for a change resulting from a pre-referral conference, an IEP, or at the request of the supervisor of Special Needs for the Secondary Level may be made.
  4. Exceptions to the above regulations may be made only under extraordinary circumstances with written permission of the principal.

 

 

 

 

Grading Systems – Weighted Values

 

Letter Grade Numerical Grade Equivalent Advanced Placement (AP) Level Courses Honors

Level Courses

College Prep

Level Courses

A+ 97-100 5.00 4.66 4.33
A 93-96 4.66 4.33 4.00
A- 90-92 4.33 4.00 3.66
B+ 87-89 4.00 3.66 3.33
B 83-86 3.66 3.33 3.00
B- 80-82 3.33 3.00 2.66
C+ 77-79 3.00 2.66 2.33
C 73-76 2.66 2.33 2.00
C- 70-72 2.33 2.00 1.66
D+ 67-79 2.00 1.66 1.33
D 63-66 1.66 1.33 1.00
D- 60-62 1.33 1.00 0.66
F+ 50-59 0.00 0.00 0.00
F 0-49 0.00 0.00 0.00

 

GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA) will be computed as the sum of credits each multiplied by their weighted value and then divided by the sum of credits.  All graded courses contribute towards the GPA except for Aide classes, Teaching Assistant, and other Internships.

 

HIGH HONOR ROLL will be determined by a grade point average of 3.66 or higher.  Honor rolls are based on grades at 10 week marking periods.  Grades in any of Aide classes, Teaching Assistant, and other Internships will not be included in honor roll calculations.

 

HONOR ROLL will be determined by a grade point average equal to or greater than 3.00 but less than 3.66.  Grades in any of Aide classes, Teaching Assistant, and other Internships will not be included in honor roll calculations.

 

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY candidates must maintain an earned grade point average of 3.5 or higher as well as demonstrate outstanding qualities in three additional areas:  Leadership, Character, and Service.

 

RANK IN CLASS will be determined by the GPA over eight semester. Grades in any of Aide classes, Teaching Assistant, and other Internships will not be included.

 

In order to permit students, parents, and college officers to read and interpret transcripts or report cards easily, the weights of grades are based around the standard 4.0 point scale.  A student receiving all College Prep ‘A’s, or all College Prep ‘B’s, or all College Prep ‘C’s would receive, respectively, a 4.0, 3.0, or a 2.0 grade point average.

 

Under a weighted system, it is possible for a talented student to have a GPA higher than 4.0.  With the number of advanced weighted courses available to students grades 9-12, it is possible for the maximum weighted GPA to be 4.67.

 

The GPA derived from the weighted grades is a good measure of a student’s individual achievement.  It does provide a single number, “the average,” of four years of a student’s grades.  Weighted GPA is also used as a standard to determine Honor Rolls and membership in the National Honor Society, and as such it recognizes a student’s achievement at his or her own ability level.

 

Transfer Students

 

  1. Entering Honors or Advanced Placement Courses

Holyoke High School offers honors or advanced weighted courses in World Language, Mathematics, Science, English, and Social Studies.  If the student meets the criteria, and the Guidance Counselor approves, a student may elect any of the honors or advanced placement courses based on his or her achievement at other schools.

Note:  Students may not elect to transfer into AP courses if the tests have already been ordered.

 

  1. Students Transferring from Any Vocational / Technical School

A student transferring from a vocational/technical school will be credited with a maximum 10 vocational credits (shop credits) per year.

 

  1. Students Transferring from Campus to Campus

Transferring from one high school campus in Holyoke to another once the school year has begun is a serious decision and should be made only for very important reasons. The high school campus to which a student is transferring may not be able to offer exactly the same program, possibly resulting in the loss of academic credit in certain courses for the year in which the transfer occurs.  A request for a transfer after the beginning of the school year requires the approval of the executive principal and will only be considered in emergency situations.

 

Office Hours

All teachers are available for an after school office hour on a weekly basis.  The specific day on which the office hour is scheduled rotates yearly.  Contact the Guidance Department for this year’s office hour schedule.

 

 

 

 

 

Programs of Study

In Holyoke, we are striving to create a pathway for every student – a student-informed learning trajectory that results in competitive advantage in the choice of college and or career success.  The programs of study outline the recommended course sequences (seven courses per grade) for various academies.  In addition to courses, the academy experience for students also includes work-based learning, embedded advisory activities, and learning linked to at least one core academic class.

 

The goal for each program of study is for students to achieve the Holyoke Public Schools’ graduation requirements, the MassCore graduation requirements and to have intentional access to post-secondary college and career opportunities.  To this end, each program of study has been approved for use in 2018-2019 for freshman and sophomore students.  All programs reflect the core tenets of HPS’s high school redesign:

  • Preparation for college and career success
  • Project-based learning with capstone experiences
  • Work / community-based learning
  • Flexibility and personalization
  • Stackable credentials (diploma + options)

 

Holyoke Public Schools supports the phase in of 7 academies:

  • Freshman Academy – at North Campus and South Campus
  • Newcomer Academy – at North Campus
  • Community and Global Studies Academy – launching in 2018-2019 at grade 10
  • Medical and Life Sciences Academy – launching in 2018-2019 at grade 10
  • Performing and Media Arts Academy – launching in 2018-2019 at grade 10
  • Technology, Engineering and Design Academy – launching in 2018-2019 at grade 10
  • Opportunity Academy – alternative education opportunities beyond the North and South campuses.

 

2018-2019 junior and senior students are encouraged to continue in their academic pursuits towards graduation and to consider enrolling in new core courses, career technical education programs, internships, and dual enrollment opportunities.

 

Freshman Academy at North Campus 

Class of 2022

 

Courses Graduation Requirement Semester I Semester II
1 English ●        English I

●        English I Honors

●        Literature and Composition I

●        Ethnic Studies English I

●        Ethnic Studies English I Honors

●       English I

●       English I Honors

●       Literature and Composition I

●       Ethnic Studies English I

●       Ethnic Studies English I Honors

2 Social Science ●        United States History I

●        United States History I Honors

●        Ethnic Studies – US I

●        Ethnic Studies – US I H

●        United States History I

●        United States History I Honors

●        Ethnic Studies – US I

●      Ethnic Studies – US I H

3 Mathematics ●        Algebra I

●        Algebra I Honors

●        Geometry I

●        Geometry I Honors

●        Algebra I

●        Algebra I Honors

●        Geometry I

●          Geometry I Honors

4 Science ●        Biology

●        Biology Honors

●        Biology

●          Biology  Honors

5 Language Development ●        Reading Workshop

●        Freshman English as a Second Language

●        French I

●        Latin I

●        Spanish I

●        Spanish for Native Speakers I

●        Reading Workshop

●        Freshman English as a Second Language

●        French I

●        Latin I

●        Spanish I

●        Spanish for Native Speakers I

6 Mathematics Acceleration ●        Qualitative Reasoning

●        If you do not qualify, please choose Arts electives in row 8

●        Qualitative Reasoning

If you do not qualify, please choose Arts electives in row 8

7 Health and Physical Education

 

●    Health ●        Physical Education

 

[8] 2nd Elective (OPTIONAL)

Arts or Technology

(2 semesters)

●        Design I

●        Drawing and Painting I

●        Choir

●        Music Laboratory

●        Microsoft Office Suite / User

●        Adobe Photoshop

●    Adobe Illustrator

●        PE: 1 semester

●        Health

●        Bell Choir

●        Introduction to Band A or B

●        Band

●        String Orchestra

●        Madrigal

 

 

 

 

Freshman Academy at South Campus

Class of 2022

 

Courses Graduation Requirement Semester I Semester II
1 English ●        Ethnic Studies English I

●        Ethnic Studies English I Honors

●      Ethnic Studies English I

●      Ethnic Studies English I Honors

2 Social Science ●        Ethnic Studies – US I

●        Ethnic Studies – US I Honors

●        Ethnic Studies – US I

●        Ethnic Studies – US I Honors

3 Mathematics ●        Algebra I

●        Algebra I Honors

●        Geometry I

●        Geometry I Honors

●        Algebra I

●        Algebra I Honors

●        Geometry I

●        Geometry I Honors

4 Science ●        Biology

●        Biology Honors

●        Biology

●        Biology  Honors

5 Career Technical Education ●      Career Exploration (across programs) ●      Career Exploration

(within 1 program)

 

6
7 Language

Development

●        Reading Workshop

●        Freshman English as a Second Language

●        Co-Taught English as a Second Language

●        Reading Workshop

●        Freshman English as a Second Language

●        Co-Taught English as a Second Language

 

[8] Elective (OPTIONAL)

Math Acceleration

or

Physical Education

or

Arts or Technology

(2 semesters)

 

●        Quantiative Reasoning

●        PE:  1 semster

●        Health

●        Design I

●        Music Laboratory

●        Introduction to Office and G Suites

* Health and Physical Education Integrated experience required if not selected as an elective course for both Health and Physical Education.

 

 

Newcomer Academy at North Campus

Classes of 2021 and 2022

 

Courses Graduation Requirement Semester I Semester II
1 English ●        Newcomer Literature and Composition I

●        Newcomer Literature and Composition II

●        Newcomer Literature and Composition I

●        Newcomer Literature and Composition II

2 Social Science ●        TBE Spanish U.S. History I

●        TBE Spanish U.S. History II

●        TBE Spanish U.S. History I

●        TBE Spanish U.S. History II

3 Mathematics ●        TBE Spanish Algebra I

●        TBE Spanish Geometry I

●        TBE Spanish Standards Based Math

●        TBE Spanish Algebra I

●        TBE Spanish Geometry I

●        TBE Standards Based Math

4 Science ●        TBE Spanish Biology

●        TBE Spanish Biology II

●      TBE Spanish Biology

●      TBE Spanish BIology II

5 Language Development ●      Newcomer ESL I

●      Newcomer ESL  II

●      Spanish for Native Speakers I

●      Spanish for Native Speakers II

●      AP Spanish

●      Intervention (Literacy or Math)

●      Newcomer ESL I

●      Newcomer ESL II

●      Spanish for Native Speakers I

●      Spanish for Native Speakers II

●      AP Spanish

●      Intervention (Literacy or Math)

6 Physical Education

AND

Elective

●    Physical Education: 1 semester

●    Health

●        Design I

●        Drawing and Painting I

●        Choir

●        Music Lab

●        Microsoft Office Suite / User

●        Adobe Photoshop

●        Adobe Illustrator

●        Bell Choir

●        Introduction to Band A or B

●        Band

●        String Orchestra

7 Arts or Technology

(2 semesters)

 

●        Design I

●        Design II

●        Drawing and Painting I

●        Drawing and Painting II

●        Choir

●        Music Lab

●        Microsoft Office Suite / User

●        Adobe Photoshop

●        Adobe Illustrator

●        Physical Education

●        Health

●        Restorative Youth

●        Bell Choir

●        Introduction to Band A or B

●        Band

●        String Orchestra

●        Madrigal

●        Dual Enrollment electives

Embedded

Advisory

Self-Advocacy, Financial Literacy, Public Speaking, etc. This will still include MAPP and On Track.
WBL Reverse Job Shadow, Internships, Externships, Site Visits,  Job Shadow, Community Service, etc.

Community and Global Studies (CGS) Academy

Class of 2021

 

Subject Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12
CGS Semester 1 – 2 Semester 1 -2 Semester 1 -2
English^ Ethnic Studies

English II

Argument and Rhetoric:

English III

AP Language and Composition

World Literature:  English IV

AP Literature and Composition

Math^

 

Geometry Algebra II Probability and Statistics

Pre-Calculus

Science^

 

18-19:  Biology II

19-20:  Chemistry

18-19:  Chemistry

19-20:  Physics

Electives
Social Studies^ United States

History II

The World You Inherit:

Global Contemporary Issues

Electives
Language Development^ French

Latin

Spanish

Spanish for Native Speakers

English as a Second Langauge

Reading Workshop

Arts Arts Elective

(1 semester)

Arts Elective

(1 semester)

Elective

(1 semester)

Technical

Courses

Making a Difference: Public Policy 1.1 and 1.2

 

EC:  College Readiness Accelerator and choice of HCC EDU 100: Education in America or CRJ 100:   Introduction to Criminal Justice

19-20

Ethnic Studies Leadership Program 1.1 and 1.2

or Law & Criminal Justice 1.1 and 1.2

 

 

Ethnic Studies Leadership Program 2.1 and 2.2  or

Law & Criminal Justice 2.1, 2.2
All 2nd semester are focused on capstone work.

 

Physical Education PE (1 semester) 19-20 Health and Wellness through the lens of CGS

(PE – 1 semester)

PE (1 semester)
Embedded

Advisory

Self-Advocacy, Financial Literacy, Public Speaking, etc. This will still include MAPP and On Track.

 

WBL Opportunities Video Conferencing, Site Visits, Adopt a School, Exchange Programs, Law Enforcement Ride Along, Mock Trials, Youth Court, Community Service or Service Learning Project, YPAR Projects, Internships, Externships, Field Trips:  correctional facility, police academy, crime lab, courts, etc.
Related Careers Journalism
Law
Legal Advocacy
Police and Public Safety
Armed Forces
Corrections
Government
Elected Office
Psychology & Counseling
Environmental Justice
Immigrant Rights
K-12 and Higher Education
Community Arts
City and Urban Planning
Youth Work
Policy Analysis
Social Work
Marketing
International Relations
Human Resources
Union Organizing
Grassroots Organizing
Entrepreneur and Business
Nonprofit Management

^ Note:  Students may enroll in college preparatory or honors level courses when offered. 

 

                Medical Life Sciences (MLS) Academy

Class of 2021

 

Subject 10 11 12
MLS Semester 1 – 2 Semester 1 – 2 Semester 1 – 2
English^ Literature and Composition:  English II

through the MLS Lens

Argument and Rhetoric:

English III

AP English Language

World Literature:  English IV

AP English Literature

Math^ Geometry Algebra II Probability and Statistics

Pre-Calculus

Science^ 18-19 = Bio II

19-20 = Chemistry

Anatomy & Physiology

Plant and Animal Science

AP Biology

AP Environmental

Social

Studies^

United States History II World History Electives
Language Development^ French II

French

Latin

Spanish

Spanish for Native Speakers

English as a Second Langauge

Reading Workshop

Arts Arts Elective

(1 semester)

Arts Elective

(1 semester)

Elective (1 semester)
Technical Courses 18-19 = Chemistry

19-20 = Integrated Field Science

 

EC = College Readiness (1 semester) + HCC Intro to Health Care Careers

 

19-20  Microbiology

OR Urban Ecology

19-20  Biotechnology

OR Sustainability

Physical

Education

PE (1 semester) PE (1 semester) PE (1 semester)
Embedded

Advisory

Self-Advocacy, Soft Skills, MAPP, On Track, etc.
WBL Opportunities

 

Video Conferencing, Site Visits,  Guest Speakers,  Community Service or Service Learning Project, YPAR Projects, Job Shadow, Reverse Job Shadow, Internships, Externships, Field Trip
Related Careers Emergency Medical Technician – EMT       Environmental Scientist                          Chef

Certified Nursing Assistant – CNA              Environmental Engineer                          Nutritionist

Registered Nurse – RN                               Environmental Lawyer                            Line Cook

Physicians Assistant – PA                           Geographer                                            Researcher

Medical Doctor – MD                                   Environmental Protection Agency          Lab Technician

Dental Assisting                                          Wildlife Conservation

Dentist                                                        Agriculture

^Note:  Students may enroll in college preparatory or honors level courses when offered. 

 

                        Performing and Media Arts (PMA) Academy

Class of 2021

 

Subject 10 11 12
PMA Semester 1-2 Semester 1-2 Semester 1-2
English^ Literature and Composition:  English II through the PMA Lens Argument and Rhetoric:

English III

Or AP English Language

World Literature:  English IV

Or AP English Literature

 

Math^

 

Geometry Algebra II Math Elective

Recommended

 

Science^

 

Biology  II

Chemistry

or Physics

Electives
 

Social

Studies^

 

US HIstory  II

AP US History

World History

AP World History

Electives
Language Development^ French

Latin

Spanish

Spanish for Native Speakers

English as a Second Langauge

Reading Workshop

Arts Arts Elective

(1 semester)

Arts Elective

(1 semester)

Elective

(1 semester)

Technical Courses

 

* Also fulfills art – MassCore elective

Video Production* AND

Drama 1* or Media Literacy

 

EC:  College Readiness Accelerator and

HCC COM150: Public Speaking

Journalism 1.1, 1.2 or

Video Journalism 1.1, 1.2 or

19-20 Public Speaking and Drama 2*

Journalism Studio 1.1, 1.2 or

Video Journalism Studio I and II or

Performing Arts Studio I and II*

Physical Education PE (1 semester) PE (1 semester) PE (1 semester)
Embedded

Advisory

Self-Advocacy, Financial Literacy, etc. This will still include MAPP and On Track
WBL Opportunities Video Specialist (Mike Hines), Media Specialist (The Herald), Sports Journalist (The Herald), Television/Radio (Video Journalism/Gandara Center)
Related Careers Journalist                           Radio host                           Public relations executive

Marketing executive          Social media director           Writer

Photographer                     Lawyer                                Photojournalist

Actor                                  Editor                                   Politician

Dancer                               Drama-therapist                  Community arts worker

Music therapist                  Broadcast manager             Theater director

News host                         Arts administrator                 Broadcast presenter

Film director                      Teacher                                Higher education lecturer

Camera operator

^Note:  Students may enroll in college preparatory or honors level courses when offered. 

 

Technology, Engineering and Design (TED)Academy

Class of 2021

 

Subject 10 11 12
TED Semester 1-2 Semester 1-2 Semester 1-2
English^

 

Literature and Composition:

English II

through the TED Lens

Argument and Rhetoric:

English III

Or AP English Language

World Literature:  English IV

Or STCC: Technical Writing

HCC COM 150:  Public Speaking

Math^

 

Geometry

AND
Algebra II

HCC

College Algebra

HCC Pre-Calculus HCC

Calculus

HCC

Calculus

Science^

 

18-19: Biology II

19-20+:  Physics

19-20: Physics

20-21+:  Chemistry

Advanced Science

Electives

Social Studies^

 

United States History II

 

19-20:  World History

through the TED Lens

Electives
Language Development^ French

Latin

Spanish

Spanish for Native Speakers

English as a Second Langauge

Reading Workshop

Arts Arts Elective (1 semester):
3D Computer Modeling
Arts Elective (1 semester):

19-20 – 3D Printing

Technical Courses Intro to Computer Science

AND Robotics

 

EC:  College Readiness Accelerator and HCC EGR 110:  Robotics

19-20:

Intro to Engineering Design

or Computer Science Essentials

 

20-21:

Principles of Engineering

or Computer Science Principles

 

Physical Education & Electives PE or Health

(1 semester)

PE

or Experience

(1 semester)

Entrepre-

neurship

PE

or Experience

(1 semester)

Embedded

Advisory

Self-Advocacy, Financial Literacy, etc. This will still include MAPP and On Track
WBL Opportunities Video Conferencing, Site Visits,  Guest Speakers,  Community Service or Service Learning Project,

Job Shadow, Reverse Job Shadow, Internships, Externships, Field Trip

Related Careers  

Civil Engineer                             Fluids Engineer                        Database Administrator

Mechanical Engineer                 Application Developer              Network Systems Administrator

Electrical Engineer                     Cloud Product Manager           Security Specialist

Chemical Engineer                    Computer Programmer             Automotive Engineer

Design Engineer                        Engineering Technologist         Electrician

Transportation Services             Technician / Maintenance          Materials Engineer

Materials Engineer                     Manufacturing Design Engineer

^ Note:  Students may enroll in college preparatory or honors level courses when offered. 

 

Career Technical Education (CTE) Chapter 74 Programming

South Campus – Classes of 2019, 2020 and 2021

 

Holyoke Public Schools provides the opportunities for students to complete Chapter 74 technical education training programming within the high school program.  Students choosing this option will have an academy assignment, but will follow a schedule similar to what is listed below.  For 2018-2019, the Chapter 74 programs will be offered at the South Campus.

 

Subject 10 11 12
CTE Semester 1-2 Semester 1-2 Semester 1-2
English

 

Literature and Composition:

English II

through the ACADEMY Lens

Argument and Rhetoric:

English III

[or Dual Enrollment]

World Literature:

English IV

Math

 

Geometry Algebra II Probability & Statistics

Or Pre-Calculus

Science

 

18-19: Biology II

19-20+:  Chemistry (MLS) or Physics (TED)

18-19: Physics

19-20+:  Chemistry or Physics

Advanced Elective

[or Dual Enrollment]

Social Studies United States History II World History
Language Development Co-Taught English as a Second Language

English as a Second Langauge

Reading Workshop

*Students completing a CTE Chapter 74 are exempt from World Language for MassCore requirements.  Interventions to support language development will be prioritized over general electives.

Arts Elective

(1 semester)

Elective

(1 semester)

Technical Courses Level I

CTE Course

(double-period)

Level II CTE Course

(triple-period)

 

With embedded electives:

·         Entrepreneurship

·         Introduction to Office & G Suites

·         Dual Enrollment at HCC

Level III CTE Course

(triple period)

 

With embedded electives:

·         Marketing Management

·         Microsoft User Specialist

·         Dual Enrollment at HCC

 

Physical Education PE / Health

(1 semester)

 *Embedded PE Experience PE or Experience

(1 semester)

Embedded

Advisory

My Action Plan and Portfolio / college and career readiness activities
WBL Opportunities Video Conferencing, Site Visits,  Guest Speakers,  Community Service or Service Learning Project,

Job Shadow, Reverse Job Shadow, Internships, Externships, Field Trip

Approved Chapter 74 Programs HHS Medical Life Sciences Academy           TED Academy

Cosmetology Health Services                           Advanced Manufacturing              Carpentry

Culinary                                                             Automotive Collision Repair          Diesel Technology

Health Assisting                                                Programming and Web Design     Electrical Technology

 

Academy Alignment

In 2018-2019, all freshman and sophomore students will be connected to an academy across Holyoke High School.  An academy provides connected academic, work-based learning and social support experiences to students.  Teacher teams staff an academy and have dedicated common planning time to coordinate academic and social supports, exhibitions of student work, curriculum projects and work-based learning activities.  The academy experiences exist at and stretch across both North Campus and South Campus.  The academies, grades, campus location and programmatic themes are identified in the table below.

 

Holyoke High School
Grade North Campus South Campus
9 Newcomer

Academy

Freshman Academy
·         Teams 1, 2, 3 ·         Team 4
10-12 Linked Learning Academies

Launching in 2018-2019 at grade 10

Community and Global Studies Academy
·         Criminal justice

·         Ethnic studies

·         Law and public policy

Medical and Life Sciences
·         Biological sciences

·         Healthcare

·         Urban ecology and sustainability

·         Cosmetology

·         Culinary

·         Health Assisting

 

Performing and Media Arts
·         Performing arts

·         Media communications

·         Graphic and visual arts

Technology, Engineering and Design
·         Computer science

·         Engineering

·         Industrial design

 

 

 

 

·         Advanced Manufacturing

·         Automotive Collision

·         Carpentry

·         Diesel Technology

·         Electrical Technology

·         Web Design & Programming

 

COURSE CATALOG

This section lists the courses offered by all departments at Holyoke High School. The availability of each course is contingent upon enrollment. Each entry has a short description of the course content as well as information on assigned credits, course duration, course weights, and prerequisites. Students should familiarize themselves with the course offerings before scheduling a meeting with their guidance counselor.

 

Each course is identified by name, followed by a short course description, a list of pre-requisites, if applicable, and course numbers.  Credit is awarded on a semester-basis.  The following symbols are included in this year’s handbook as a means of assisting in the launch of new courses and academies in 2018-2019:

 

New course offering for 2018-2019

Alignment with the Community and Global Studies Academy themes

Alginment with the Medical Life Sciences Academy themes

Alignment with the Performing and Media Arts Design themes

Alignment with the Technology, Engineering and Design themes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARTS DEPARTMENT

Students may meet the two-semester “arts” MassCore requirement through electives in music, performing arts, technological arts and/or  visual arts.

 

MUSIC – ELECTIVES

Introduction to Band A

Students will learn to read music and to play (or further develop their ability to play) woodwind (flute, clarinet, saxophone) or percussion instruments.  Focus will be placed on developing a fundamental understanding of music reading, music vocabulary, and aesthetic musical values.  Students will practice in a large ensemble as well as in like instrument groups.  Percussionists will learn all instruments including, but not limited to, the xylophone, glockenspiel, snare drum, bass drum, timpani, cymbals, and hand percussion.  Limited to 6 percussion spots.  After school rehearsals and concert attendance is mandatory (about 6 per year).

 

PREREQUISITE:  None.  No experience necessary.  Incoming 9th graders and rising 10th graders who have not had the opportunity to play a band instrument or need more experience before being able to join the HHS Band are highly encouraged to join.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1522                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1523                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Introduction to Band B

Students will learn to read music and to play (or further develop their ability to play) brass (trumpet, french horn, trombone, baritone, or tuba).  Focus will be placed on developing a fundamental understanding of music reading, music vocabulary, and aesthetic musical values.  Students will practice in a large ensemble as well as in like instrument groups.  After school rehearsals and concert attendance is mandatory (about 6 per year).

 

PREREQUISITE:  None.  No experience necessary.  Incoming 9th graders and rising 10th graders who have not had the opportunity to play a band instrument or need more experience before being able to join the HHS Band are highly encouraged to join.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1524                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Courses # 1525             2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

Percussion Ensemble

This course provides students a hand-on learning experience to learn the fundamentals of musicianship through the performance of percussion instruments.  Students will play everything from garbage cans to marimbas and perform music from a variety of genres and cultures.  Performances and music composition are a natural outgrowth of the students’ work in this course.

 

PREREQUISITE:  No experience necessary. All band percussionists are encouraged to join.

Semester 1:  Course #1526                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1527                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Music Laboratory    

This course is for students who want to learn fundamental musical skills.  No musical background is necessary, just a desire to learn.  Students will carry out projects based on based on using the latest music software for theory, composition, and recording. This class will cover the same curriculum as Music Theory I and Electronic Music at Holyoke Community College. Class size may be limited to facilitate access to the equipment. HCC articulation agreement – 5 college credits

 

Semester:  Course #1511                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

PERFORMING ARTS – ELECTIVES

Band

Marching band and concert band. Students will continue to develop their technical and

artistic skills through the performance of functional and art music of different genres and cultures in a variety of performance settings. Emphasis will be placed on developing aesthetic values through active participation. Musicianship is stressed, with the focus being placed on music reading, listening skills, and ensemble playing. Students must be available to perform at school activities, public concerts, parades, and music festivals as well as weekly evening rehearsals. Performances are a natural outgrowth of the students’ work in this course.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Instrumental music in the 2017-2018 school year or approval of instructor

Fall:          Course #1512                     2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Spring:     Course #1513                     2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Bell Choir

This course is open to interested students who desire to perform in a small ensemble

using handbells.  Students will study the technique of handbell ringing and the reading of sheet  music  for  handbells.  They will perform at school events as well as civic ceremonies.

 

Semester:  Course #1514                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Choir

This course requires no audition, and all students are welcome.  It provides opportunities

for musical and social growth.  Students receive vocal training and develop their aural skills.  The choir performs at public concerts, school activities, and community functions. Performances are a natural outgrowth of the students’ work in this course.

 

Fall:          Course #1515                     2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Spring:     Course #1516                    2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Drama I                                                                                          

Drama I is an introductory-level course for the performing arts. Drama I combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. Courses of study may include improvisation, stage movement, presentation, and slam poetry.

 

Semester:  Course #1517                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Madrigal

This small select group of singers who perform classical to modern works in multiple part harmony without accompaniment.  They perform at civic and school related functions as well as participate in competitions.  NOTE:  HCC articulation agreement – one college credit issued upon successful completion of six semesters of Madrigal.

 

PREREQUISITE:       Audition and recommendation of the director

Fall:          Course #1518                     2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Spring:     Course #1519                    2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

String Orchestra

Students will begin or continue study on the violin and cello.  Emphasis will be placed on developing aesthetic values through active participation. Musicianship is stressed, with the focus being placed on music reading, listening skills, and ensemble playing. After school concert attendance is mandatory.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Previous lessons in violin, viola, and cello at the middle or high school level.   Beginners must receive teacher approval.

Fall:          Course #1520                     2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Spring:     Course #1521                    2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

TECHNOLOGICAL ARTS – ELECTIVES

 

Adobe Photoshop

Adobe Photoshop is a hands-on introductory course that will introduce the student to the basics of Photoshop.  Adobe Photoshop is a professional image-editing program used to create  original  artwork,  manipulate  color  images,  and  retouch  photographs  for  page layout, multimedia, and the Web.  In this course, students will learn many of the basic skills that will allow them to take advantage of Photoshop’s powerful tools.

 

Semester:  Course #1540                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Adobe Illustrator 

Adobe Illustrator is a hands-on introductory course that will introduce the student to the basics of Illustrator.   Adobe Illustrator is a professional illustration software program used to create graphics and type effects for page layout, multimedia, and the web.  In this course, students will learn many of the basic skills that will allow them to take advantage of Illustrator’s powerful tools.

 

Semester:  Course #1541                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

3D Computer Modeling                                                                                                 

Imaginative people often love to draw and create! Add a computer to this mix and you will discover you can create three-dimensional projects using powerful, yet easy to learn, modeling tools along with libraries of 3D objects. This course will introduce you to Google SketchUp, a free program that is powerful enough for commercial applications such as Architecture and Engineering, yet simple enough that a 3rd grader can learn to use it. This course will help you master the basics of SketchUp and explore how to apply those skills to your future learning and work.

 

Semester:  Course #1542                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Video Production                                                                                                                                        Provides a hands-on introduction to producing videos and broadcast television.  The class will focus on four basic components; proper handling and operation of a video camera, recording audio with a variety of microphones, the important role of lighting, and the use of technology through editing software for students to deliver finished video to a viewing audience.  Students will complete programs working alone, or in teams similar to a broadcast studio crew.  Subjects will range from arts and theatre, documentary and news, to sports and commercials.  Note: Students will be required to sign a contract of responsibility for equipment use.

 

Semester:  Course #1543                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

VISUAL ARTS – ELECTIVES

Design I

This course offers a basic foundation course in two and three dimensional design. Topics included are: elements and principles of design, color study, three-dimensional design in clay and paper. Also included is a survey of art history.

 

Semester:  Course #1560                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Design II

This course places an emphasis on crafts including work in clay, textiles, printmaking, etc. Art history is included.

 

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Design I (C or better)

Semester:  Course #1561                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Design III

This course extends Design II with emphasis on more mature work.  Based on enrollment, the course may be offered simultaneously with AP Studio Art.

 

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Design II (C or better)

Semester:  Course #1562                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Drawing & Painting I 

This course offers a basic foundation course in drawing and painting, including drawing people, perspective, still life and landscapes. Also included is a survey of art history.

 

Semester:  Course #1563                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Drawing & Painting II

This course reinforces drawing and painting skills with emphasis on fine arts aspects. Art history included.

 

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Drawing & Painting I (C or better)

Semester:  Course #1564                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Drawing and Painting III

This course extendes Drawing and Painting II with emphasis on more mature work.  Based on enrollment, the course may be offered simultaneously with AP Studio Art.

 

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Drawing & Painting II (C or better)

Semester:  Course #1565                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 Advanced Placement Art Studio

AP Studio Art portfolios is designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art.  The emphasis is on critical analysis and innovative art-making processes. AP Studio Art is not based on a written exam; instead, students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year. The portfolio will reflect: quality (selected works), concentration (sustained investigation) and breadth (range of approaches).

 

As in the introductory college course, students will need to work outside the classroom, as well as in it, and beyond scheduled periods. Students must be responsible enough to leave the art room or school if an assignment requires them to do so, and homework, such as maintaining a sketchbook or a journal, is a necessary component of instruction. Group and individual critiques enable students to learn to analyze their own work and their peers’ work.

 

The AP Studio Art Program consists of three portfolios — 2D Design, 3D Design and Drawing — corresponding to common college foundation courses.  Check with the instructor to determine which courses are available for enrollment.  Based on demand, the different portfolio areas may be offered independently, simultaneously or on a rolling basis.

 

PREREQUISITE:  AP criteria with completion of Drawing I & II or Design I & II (B- or better)

2D Design       Semester 1:  Course #1566                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

2D Design       Semester 2:  Course#1567                 2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

3D Design       Semester 1:  Course #1568                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

3D Design       Semester 2:  Course #1569                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

Drawing           Semester 1:  Course #1570                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

Drawing           Semester 2:  Course #1571                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

 

 

 

Career Technical Education

 

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION – ELECTIVES

Accounting Intensive

This  accounting  course  offers  an  accelerated  approach  to  all  students  interested  in learning about the accounting cycle.  Automated Accounting software enables students to learn how computers are used for business record-keeping and accounting needs. Accounting software offers integration with other application such as spreadsheets and word processors.  Emphasis will be placed upon the theory and purpose of accounting. Students will become competent using all books of financial record.  Formatting and interpreting financial reports for service and merchandising business will be stressed. This course is a “must” for all students planning a major in the many fields of business and economics at the college level.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Successful completion of Algebra I

Semester:  Course #1248       2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Career Exploration   (SOUTH CAMPUS ONLY)

During this 20 week course students have the opportunity to explore 9 career technical programs offered at the south campus.  These students will explore each of the programs for one day, at the conclusion of the one day experience, the students will examine four of their top programs of interest.  Ongoing career development is critical to every student during the time spent in their top four programs and every student will have to narrow their career technical program to two choices before the end of the term.  The students will begin their individual career plans and goal setting standards as they assess each program.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1601    5.0 credits (double block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Marketing Management 

This course offers a concentrated overview of general business principles.  Topics include: economics, marketing, management, and business ethics from both domestic and international perspectives.  Students gain an understanding of successful problem solving and decision making strategies involved in operating a business in a global economy.

 

Semester:  Course #1602       2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Introduction to Office and G Suites  

This is an introductory course designed to provide an overview of keyboarding; Microsoft Office Suites including Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint, and Access; and the Google Classroom Suite.  The technology skills gained can be applied to work in other business courses and/or transferred into other curricular areas, including mathematics, English, science, social studies and foreign languages.  This course is highly recommended for Freshmen and incoming students.

 

Semester:  Course #1603       2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS)

This prep course provides a framework for end-user proficiency with Microsoft Office Suite applications.An opportunity is provided to master the four components of the suite:  Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint and Microsoft Access.   NOTE:  HCC articulation agreement – four college credits for successful completion of Introduction to Office and G Suites and Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS).

 

PREREQUISITE:  Successful completion of Introduction to Office and G Suites (C or better)

Semester:  Course #1604       2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Starting a Million-Dollar Business:  Entrepreneurship     

Starting a Million-dollar Business:  Entrepreneurship will allow all students an opportunity to develop a successful, profitable and community beneficial business through design and collaboration within one semester.  Students will study and analyze the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs.  The course will use various styles of instruction including discussion, closed-reading and project-based learning to give students a well-rounded, real world business education, allowing students to opportunity to own the next million-dollar business.

 

Semester:  Course #1605       2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Work-Based Learning Internship                   

Internship experiences provide junior and senior students with the opportunity to explore career interests while applying the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom to a workplace setting. This practical experience offers professional skill development that builds upon the essential skills needed for students to be an engaged and productive member of the community. Student interns will set individualized learning objectives, investigate an industry in which they are interning, develop and maintain a resume, and reflect on the experiences obtained within a business environment which will support the defining of their future career goals.

Fall Semester:  Course #1606         2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Spring Semester:  Course #1607    2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Fall Semester:  Course #1608         5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight (double period)

Spring Semester:  Course #1609    5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight (double period)

Fall Semester:  Course # 1698        7.5 creits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight (triple period)

Spring Semester:  Course #1699    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight (triple period)

 

Details:

  • Students must work a minimum of 5 hours per week at their internship to earn 2.5 credits; 10 hours per week for 5.0 credits and 15 hours per week for 7.5 credits.
  • Students must track hours worked.
  • Students complete a reflection each marking period.
  • Internship supervisors evaluate student progress.
  • Students will be awarded a PASS for satisfactory work and growth or a FAIL for unsatisfactory work and a lack of growth.

 

How do I obtain an internship?

  • If you know of a business or organization or other site that is related to your field of interest, contact the site to ask if they take high school interns.
  • If you are not sure where to start, make an appointment with your guidance counselor, Career Point, an academy lead or a teacher and ask for recommendations about possible internships sites.
  • Once you have secured a work site, obtain an internship contract from the Career Technical Education (CTE) Director at HHS. This form should be filled out by the student and the internship supervisor.
  • The Career Technical Education Director (CTE) will communicate with the site and oversee the internship.

 

 

CAREER TECHNICAL CHAPTER 74 PROGRAMS

(SOUTH CAMPUS ONLY)

 

 

Students enrolled in Chapter 74 vocational education programs, regardless of program, focus their studies on six strands of learning:

  1. Safety and health knowledge and skills
  2. Technical skills
  3. Embedded academics
  4. Employability and career awareness
  5. Management and entrepreneurship knowledge and skills
  6. Technology literacy knowledge and skills

 

 

 

 

 

 

ADVANCED MANUFACTURING:  MACHINE TOOL TECHNOLOGY

Manufacturing in Massachusetts is growing and companies in the state are generating over $40 billion in revenue.  The common problem faced by these companies is a lack of qualified workers capable of filling the existing jobs.  Roughly 7000 companies have expressed this concern along with an estimation that

there will be 100,000 manufacturing job vacancies in the next 5-10 years.  The Chapter 74 approved Machine Tool Technology program aims to contribute to the skills gap by providing highly trained individuals to immediately enter the workforce upon graduation and or prepare them for post-secondary education.

 

Machine Tool Technology Exploration

Students learn machine and shop safety and then shadow an upperclassman for several weeks to become familiar with the shop and the machines.  Upon demonstration of proficiency for safety and the production of parts, students earn autonomous use of machines and will begin independent work activities and projects.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1680    5.0 credits (double block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing and Safety 1.1

This course will introduce the student to the fundamentals of safety, problem solving and equipment and machine operation.  The student will demonstrate the safe operation of equipment and understand the importance of PPE (personal Protective Equipment).  Students will employ appropriate shop project designs and problem solving skills using strategies in a group setting and alone.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1681    5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Blueprint Reading and Advanced Manufacturing Processes 1.2

This course will introduce the student to quality control and the inspection procedures required to scale with precision measurement and tolerance.  Students will demonstrated the ability to distinguish among the appropriate precision measuring tools according to allowable tolerances on a given design.  Students will read blueprints and assemble products according to detailed drawings and annotated hand sketches that meet American National Standards Institute and International Organizations for Standards.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1682    5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Material Sciences and Machining Processes 2.1

In this course students will research all materials and tooling needed to build a product from the curriculum.  Students will design a production plan that will satisfy the steps needed to create the project from start to completion.  Students will identify and describe material properties and metals.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Blueprint Reading and Advanced Manufacturing Processes

Semester 1:  Course #1683    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Process Planning and Machining Operations 2.2

In this course students will demonstrate general machining operations using shop developed projects and tasks.  Students will demonstrate skills in the turning of cylindrical and square stock and will demonstrate knowledge set up and fixtures needed for the completion of machining processes.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Material Sciences and Machining Processes

Semester 2:  Course #1684    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Mechanical Processing 3.1

This course is the first in a two part series relating the various processes related to machine tooling.  Students will calculate speeds and feeds for given tooling and material and will demonstrate the operation of power saw processes, finishing processes, and grinding processes.  Students will demonstrate precision operation using tools associated with the production of square and cylindrical finished products.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Process Planning and Machining Operations 2.2

Semester 1:  Course #1685    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Mechanical Processing 3.2

This is the second course of a two part series relating the processes of machine tooling.  Students will be turning procedures to specified tolerance following blueprint specifications and will demonstrate skills in the set up and milling of shapes and surfaces with a working knowledge of datum’s to set-up and machine a finished product.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Mechanical Processing 3.1         

Semester 2:  Course #1686    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

AUTO COLLISION

 

Auto Collision Exploration

The students will be exposed to the day-to-day activities of the Auto Collision Program. Opportunities within the professional field will be explained. Program routines will be introduced and classroom norms will be reinforced. Projects will be designed to introduce students to basic skills needed to succeed in the Auto Collision Industry. Dent repair and spray painting will be featured.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1610    5.0 credits (double block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Auto Collision 1.1

The Auto Collision program begins with basic shop and personal safety practices. Team building and career opportunities are explored along with the use of spray and welding simulators the students will have the ability to safely try new skills to expand their understanding of the requirements in the Auto

Collision industry. Professional work practice and workforce expectations will be the culture throughout the Auto Collision program. The students will also perform daily shop maintenance and small assignments that focus on hands-on mechanical skills, fine motor skills and shop safety training.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1611    5.0 credits (double block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Auto Collision 1.2

The Auto Collision course will be a comprehensive study of tools. Safe usage and identification of hand tools and power tools will be studied along with tool storage and organizing skills. Threads and fasteners will be studied which involves metric and SAE measurements and how various fasteners work and how to identify and describe threaded and non-threaded fasteners. Shop activities will include  disassembly and reassembly of parts and vehicles. Sorting and organizing of hardware will be introduced to help with the expanding fastener inventory.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1612    5.0 credits (double block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Auto Collision 2.1

Thel Auto Collision students will begin with a review of shop and personal safety. The fundamental study of vehicle construction, structural and non-structural repairs will studied. Shop activities will include actual collision repairs on vehicles that will give the students better understanding of how vehicle construction affects vehicle safety and how important it is to complete repairs that will preserve vehicle integrity

 

PREREQUISITE:  Successful completion of Auto Collision 1.2

Semester 1:  Course #1613    7.5 credits (triple block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Auto Collision 2.2

The Auto Collision program will expand the student’s understanding of metal straightening and welding/ bonding of vehicle parts. Plastic repairs will be introduced. Shop activities will allow the students to improve their skills on vehicles that are brought in by the public with the expectation that the repairs will be completed professionally and vehicle safety is maintained.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1614    7.5 credits (triple block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Auto Collision 3.1

The Auto Collision program will continue with review all lessons that have been studied to date. Refinishing will be studied and practiced including proper mixing and application of top coats and undercoats. Sanding and preparation of undercoats for top coats. Single stage and Base Coat/ Clear Coat top coats will studied and applied. Shop activities will include refinishing of parts and vehicles using a production mindset that will prepare students for workforce expectations.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Successful completion of Auto Collision 2.2

Semester 1:  Course #1615    7.5 credits (triple block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Auto Collision 3.2

The Auto Collision program will conclude with review of shop and personal safety practices. Final detailing and quality control will be practiced in the shop environment. Job readiness and soft skills will be the overall culture throughout the Auto Collision course will be reinforced to prepare the students for co-op opportunities and entry into the workforce

 

Semester 2:  Course #1616    7.5 credits (triple block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

CARPENTRY TECHNOLOGY

 

 

Carpentry Exploration

This course provides students with the basic knowledge and relevance of safety, estimating, and career paths in the field of construction technology. Students receive instruction in hand tools and their applications and general shop safety. Students will put in to practice what they have learned by building an assigned project. Critical thinking skills are emphasized throughout the course

 

Semester 2:  Course #1620    5.0 credits (double block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Carpentry 1.1

This course builds on the skills students have acquired as freshmen. Students begin to interpret blueprints, learn components of platform framing and hone their hands on skills as they embark on construction of a scale model of a house. Tool and worksite safety is an integral part of the shop curriculum. Students learn estimating and are introduced to state and local building codes. Students are evaluated by their performance on individual and group projects.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1621    5.0 credits (double block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Carpentry 1.2

Students receive instruction in blueprint reading and interpreting “to scale” drawings. Tool and jobsite safety includes the use of portable power tools, and an introduction to state and local building codes, including 10 hours of Career Safe (an online course involving 65 tests). Reading, writing, and math assignments related to the construction technology profession are integrated with academic frameworks during this class. Students also learn the basics of forming and pouring concrete for residential and commercial construction.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1622    5.0 credits (double block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

Carpentry 2.1

This course provides the construction technology student with advanced knowledge in the areas of shop and worksite safety, estimating, and state and local building codes. Students will have the opportunity to work in two different training settings. Students rotate from working on projects within the shop to working on off-campus sites in which they will be engaged in community service construction projects within the district. The emphasis of instruction and projects is on residential house framing and finishing procedures.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Carpentry 1.2

Semester 1:  Course #1623    7.5 credits (triple block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

Carpentry 2.2

This course provides the carpentry student with advanced knowledge in the area of safety, estimating, and state and local building codes. The main concentration for instruction includes residential house framing. There will be a strong emphasis on interpreting blueprints as well as state and local building codes. Reading, writing, and math assignments related to the construction technology professions are integrated with academic frameworks during this class.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1624    7.5 credits (triple block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Carpentry 3.1

This course provides the carpentry student with advanced knowledge in the areas of safety, estimating, and state and local building codes. The goal of this course is to provide each student with the technical knowledge and experiences essential to secure employment as a carpenter and or transition to a post-secondary institution. Students rotate from working on projects within the shop to working on off-campus sites within the district engaged in community service construction projects. Students also have the option to participate in the co-op and work-study programs.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Carpentry 2.2

Semester 1:  Course #1625    7.5 credits (triple block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Carpentry 3.2

This course provides construction technology students with advanced knowledge of relevance of safety and estimating, blueprint reading, as well as state and local building codes. Instruction in house planning is emphasized. Research, which includes reading, writing and math assignments related to construction technology professions, is integrated with academic frameworks during this class.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1626    7.5 credits (triple block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

COSMETOLOGY 

Cosmetology is a Chapter 74 career technical education program approved through the MA Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.  Upon completion of this technical program, career opportunities include, but are not limited to:

  • Cosmetologist
  • Salon Owner
  • Makeup Artist
  • Platform Artist
  • National Product Educator
  • Color Technician

 

The HPS Cosmetology Chapter 74 career technical program is certified in the following areas:

  • Cosmetology State Board Licensure – Massachusetts

 

The HPS Cosmetology Chapter 74 career technical program offers the following certifications for students:

  • Cosmetology State Board Licensure – Massachusetts
  • Hair Max – Universal Salon Software
  • Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 10 Hour Certificate
  • Barbicide Certification

 

 

Behind the Chair:  Cosmetology Exploration

This course provides students with an overview of the cosmetology program. Students are introduced to safety, cosmetology skills and equipment, and different types of careers available to cosmetology students. The skills discussed and equipment used involves manicures, roller placement, facials, and blow drying with an emphasis on client safety. A written test and composition on their experience determine students’ potential success in the cosmetology profession.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1630    5.0 credits (double block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

New Beginnings: Aspiring Cosmetologist 1.1

This course is designed to develop the basic skills and knowledge needed for success in the cosmetology field. The students will work on the fundamentals of hair design. These tasks include wet hairstyling, shampooing, rinsing and conditioning, haircutting, thermal styling, thermal hair straightening and the art of finger waving. Salon ecology covers valuable information with regards to effective sanitation and hygiene practice. The student is made aware of the diagnosis of minor scalp conditions which may occur while in the salon setting (i.e. pediculosis, head lice, psoriasis) Also included in this course are nail disorders and diseases and the functions of the skin.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1631    5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

New Beginnings: Aspiring Cosmetologist 1.2

The students continue developing the techniques, and procedures of wet hairstyling, shampooing, rinsing and conditioning, haircutting, thermal styling, thermal hair straightening and the art of finger waving, as well as additional skills such as introduction  to hairstyling for competition, and mock chemical procedures. The related theory component during this course also includes bacteriology, decontamination, properties of the scalp, the skin and its diseases and disorders. The students refer to their textbook, Milady Standard, as a reference tool. Instruction includes demonstrations, hands on practice, writing and reading assignments, reports, quizzes and tests to determine competency levels.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of New Beginnings: Aspiring Cosmetologist 1.1

Semester 2:  Course #1632    5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Breaking the Bonds: Altering Hair and Nails 2.1                                                                  

This course is designed to give students a strong foundation in permanent waving, chemical relaxing, basic hair color theory, classification of color, facial waxing, and nail enhancements. This course focuses on hair analysis (i.e. texture, density, elasticity, and porosity). Students gain knowledge in the fundamentals of proper formulation of temporary, semi-permanent and permanent hair color as well as rod selection and chemical choice for permanent waving. Students will rehearse the client consultation and learn to keep a log of services. The students work on clients from the community in an actual salon setting.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of New Beginnings: Aspiring Cosmetologist 1.2

Semester 1:  Course #1633    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Breaking the Bonds: Altering Hair and Nails 2.2

This course is a continuation of advanced knowledge and technical skills in the cosmetology program. This course focuses on the systems of the body that affect the cosmetologist role. Even students weak in science find this subject to be very beneficial in relating to the trade. Cells, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, circulatory, endocrine, excretory, respiratory digestive and reproductive systems are all reflected in the quality of the hair and nails. Instruction includes demonstrations, hands on practice, writing and reading assignments, reports, quizzes and tests to determine competency levels.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Breaking the Bonds:  Altering Hair and Nails 2.1

Semester 2:  Course #1634    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Like a Pro 3.1:  Workplace Readiness Skills

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to master their technical skills and comprehension level in the cosmetology program. Students will continue with chemical services. During this time advanced coloring techniques are taught and students practice problem solving techniques with corrective color. Students are also exposed to foiling and highlighting and become proficient working with ethnic hair. Salon marketing is offered also to students pursuing a career in Cosmetology. This course is designed to assist the student in developing an understanding how to build a profitable clientele. Salon displays, client record, business management, and prospecting clients are addressed. Students build towards their career with goal setting, resume preparation and advertising. Upon fulfillment of 1000 hours requirement students are eligible for a co-op opportunity and are prepared to take their state board exam.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Breaking the Bonds:  Altering Hair and Nails 2.2

Semester 1:  Course #1635    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Like a Pro 3.2:  Workplace Readiness Skills

This course is designed for students to continue mastering their skills, increasing their efficiency and technical knowledge through theoretical and practicum repetition.  After students obtain the required 1000 clock hours students will receive an application for the Massachusetts State Operator License Exam and become eligible for Co-op opportunities.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Like a Pro 3.1:  Workplace Readiness Skills

Semester 2:  Course #1636    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

CULINARY 

 

 

Culinary Exploration

Students will be introduced to sanitation, kitchen safety and personal/professional hygiene. Students will learn about kitchen utensils, small equipment, basic knifes skills and safe handling procedures. They also will be introduced to basic hot and cold food preparations in addition to basic techniques in the bakeshop. They will work with weights, measurements, and simple recipe conversions.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1640    5.0 credits (double block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Culinary 1.1                                                                                                 

Students will explore the basics of kitchen safety, sanitation and personal hygiene, and equipment identification and use. In addition, they learn about weights, measurements and simple recipe conversions. Students will learn about kitchen utensils, small equipment, knife skills and basic hot and cold food preparations. They build upon the basic baking principles and ingredients as well as baking equipment and formulas.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1641    5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Culinary 1.2                                                                                                 

Students advance their knowledge of food preparation focusing on dry and moist cooking methods. All students rotate through different stations preparing, organizing and producing various food items. Basic theory will include a range of equipment identification, fruit and vegetable identification, basic cooking methods, storage and receiving of products, as well as a la carte and catered events. Students will develop advanced baking skills through the production of yeast and quick breads, muffins, scones, cookies & pies.  Students earn the ServSafe Food Handlers Certification through the National Restaurant Association.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1642    5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Culinary 2.1                                                                                                 

Students will continue to receive instruction in nutrition, safety, sanitation and personal hygiene. In the kitchen, students learn and practice soups, stocks and sauce making; fruit and vegetable identification; dairy, eggs and cheese; salad and salad dressings; nutritional menu development; as well as starches and grain cookery. Students will continue to advance their understanding of lean and rich doughs, doughnuts, pancake, waffles, custards, sauces and syrups.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Culinary 1.2

Semester 1:  Course #1643    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Culinary 2.2                                                                                                     

The curriculum includes meat, poultry and seafood identification, fabrication and cooking methods.  Students learn the art of garde manger in buffet and cold food service. Students continue to develop front of the house customer service skills. Students advance on their level of skills in baking and pastry including tarts, fruit and frozen desserts. Baking techniques and daily production are essential to perfecting the students skills.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1644    7.5credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Culinary 3.1                                                                                                 

Students begin their “front of the house” and “back of the house” restaurant training through the operation of the Culinary Cafe (Hawks Nest), open to faculty and the public and private catered functions. They have opportunities to advance their culinary skills and knowledge while creating seasonal, ethnic, and local menus. Students learn advanced baking and pastry techniques including, but not limited to, working with laminated doughs, chocolate, custards, mousses, soufflés & specialty cakes.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Culinary 2.2

Semester 1:  Course #1645    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

Culinary 3.2                                                                                                 

In a working restaurant environment students continue their education with soups, stocks and sauce making; fruit and vegetable identification and cookery; dairy, eggs and cheese; salad and salad dressings; nutritional menu development as well as starches and grain cookery.  They review meat, poultry and seafood identification, fabrication and cookery. Students will perfect their baking & pastry skills using specialized decorating, plating and presentation techniques. Students will demonstrate the ability to complete a job application and interview. They also will have the opportunity to pursue cooperative work experience. They complete 30 hours of coursework which leads to ServSafe Food Protection Managers Certification through the National Restaurant Association.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1646                7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

DIESEL TECHNOLOGY 

 

 

Diesel Technology Exploration

Students will explore all aspects of Diesel Technology from what a career could look like in the field to hands on portion of work that would be done in the trade area.  This will include safety procedures and learning how to work safely in the trade area.  Also, students will work on equipment in the trade area getting a true hands on feel of what it would be like to work in the Diesel Transportation and heavy equipment field.  This work will include basic engine theory, Basic brakes and driveline theory,

Introduction into basic direct current electrical wiring and simple hydraulic circuits.  All of these tasks are

 

 

preemptive and basic introduction into what they will be doing as they advance into the next grade levels.   All of the tasks are completed and followed from the Massachusetts Diesel Technology Frameworks.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1650    2.5 credits (double block) 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Diesel Technology 1.1

In the Fall the Students in Diesel Technology will obtain the knowledge in the following areas of Diesel Technology Safety and Health applicable to the industry to include environmental aspects and disposal of hazardous materials produced from servicing of diesel equipment Next they will study Fasteners, to include bolts and fasteners of different types. After fasteners they will study and learn how to use precision and non-precision measuring equipment.  All of these factors will be used and applied in a shop setting so that students get hands on applications of the skills learned. All year there will be employability skills practiced and reinforced through career cruising and related information.   All of the tasks are completed and followed from the Massachusetts Diesel Technology Frameworks.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1651    5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

Diesel Technology 1.2

In the spring the students will learn about hand tools and all tools that encompass physical force to operate and to manipulate.  These tools will be used in our shop and the industry for many years to come.  The students will be able to use these tools properly and per industry standards and in a manner not to damage components.  After hand tools students will learn how to use power tools safely and how they can make their job easier and more efficient in a industry setting.  These tasks will be done in the shop area and on industry related components. All year there will be employability skills practiced and reinforced through career cruising and related information.  All of the tasks are completed and followed from the Massachusetts Diesel Technology Frameworks.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1652    5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Diesel Technology 2.1

In the fall of the 11th grade high school year we will review shop safety.  After proficiency has been obtained students will move on to.  Suspension systems, Brakes, and driveline work.  To include spring suspension and air suspension.  Under brakes they will be included hydraulic and air brake assemblies.  Driveline will include drive shafts, and differential assemblies.  This work will be completed in a shop setting mirroring industry practices. All year there will be employability skills practiced and reinforced through career cruising and related information.  All of the tasks are completed and followed from the Massachusetts Diesel Technology Frameworks.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Diesel Technology 1.2

Semester 1:  Course  #1653   7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Diesel Technology 2.2

In the spring of the 11th grade high school year.  Students will study mechanical portions of the engine.  This will include the cylinder head and related components, exhaust, intake, cylinder blocks, and related mechanical components.   This will also include lubrication of the engine.  Last will be batteries and how they work and hold and retain energy.   Also batteries students will know how they are hooked up in and operate under normal conditions. All year there will be employability skills practiced and reinforced through career cruising and related information.  All of this work will be done in the shop related setting and all of the tasks are completed and followed from the Massachusetts Diesel Technology Frameworks.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1654    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Diesel Technology 3.1

In the fall of the students senior year they will be working on engine related diagnostics and troubleshooting through diagnostic systems provided by manufacturers electronic diagnostic systems. After students master those tasks the students will go through anti-lock brake systems. Learning how they work and how they help you maneuver vehicles in a panic stop scenarios.    After students have a good understanding of these tasks we will cover heating ventilation and air conditioning.  All year there

 

 

will be employability skills practiced and reinforced through career cruising and related information.  All of this work will be done in the shop related setting and all of the tasks are completed and followed from the Massachusetts Diesel Technology Frameworks.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Diesel Technology 2.2

Semester 1:  Course #1655    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Diesel Technology 3.2

In the spring students will review content that they have previously learned and work on related equipment that comes into the diesel shop.  During this time the student should be looking and have submitted resumes to local shops for cooperative employment for paid on the job training experiences.

If the student does not find a cooperative education placement then the student should be looking at post secondary options in the field they have studied.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1656    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY 

 

Electrical Technology Exploration

The exploratory course focuses on capturing student interest by exposing students to circuitry projects. This is done by first orienting students on the importance of safety when working with hand tools and electrical equipment. Students are then assigned basic electrical projects that gradually become increasingly more difficult. At times students participate in school projects outside from the shop. This training makes the student aware of the benefits of a career as an electrical apprentice.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1660    5.0 credits (double block) – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Electrical Technology 1.1

The Electrical Technology Program is focused on employable skills and knowledge needed to be successful in the Electrical Industry. The 10th grade fall course begins in the classroom every day for a period of related instruction on safety that focuses on accident prevention while working in the shop. Samples of the topics that are covered are personal protective equipment, fire exits, tools, shop organization, power tools, and ladder safety. Students are then required to practice what they have learned while working on a series of self-paced hands on wiring projects. This project based work is designed to deepen the understanding of the student on properly wiring electrical circuits. Students are then monitored by the instructor for project progression, safety, and technical knowledge. Student are

graded in both the classroom and shop on how well they are able to follow directions, preparedness, time management, and attitude according with project based rubric. The fall curriculum is designed to connect lessons learned to the spring semester.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1661    5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

Electrical Technology 1.2

Upon successfully completing fall semester lessons students then progress to the next step of their apprenticeship. Upon completing review lessons on shop behavior and safety. Class lessons then focus on basic electrical theory which include but not limited to understanding the atom, magnetism, description of a circuit, and electrical wiring diagrams. Basic electricity lesson alternates with technical knowledge lessons in the class. These are designed for a deeper understanding on material identification and wiring installation procedures while following the Massachusetts electrical codes. Students’ progress from residential wiring to commercial cabling as they grasp understanding and hand dexterity while working with hand tools. Individual student progression on projects depend on their ability to ignore distractions and how well the student focuses on a work environment. All students are monitored while in the shop for how well they follow safety requirements and to help them with any questions they have regarding projects.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1662    5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Electrical Technology 2.1

The Electrical Technology Program is focused on employable skills and knowledge needed to be successful in the Electrical Industry. The 11th grade fall course begins in the classroom every day for a period of related instruction on reviewing key behavior and safety expectations. Once covered, lessons pinpoint the need of applying proper electrical wiring to residential homes. To achieve this, class lessons and practical knowledge concentrate on navigating the Massachusetts electrical code to achieve a given residential wiring project.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Electrical Technology 1.2

Semester 1:  Course #1663    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Electrical Technology 2.2

Upon successfully completing fall semester lessons students then progress to the next step of their apprenticeship. Classroom lessons continue to enhance student understanding on installing and bending conduits of various sizes & types, sizing conductors to a load, stringing wires thru conduit, math calculations, fasteners, Etc.  All these lessons directly connect to practical hands on projects. Also, students participate on installing new equipment, repairing defective outlets, fixing light fixtures, and running pipe and cables throughout the school. At times students are bused to different schools in the district to perform electrical work. Students are closely monitored for safety and behavioral expectations.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1664    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Electrical Technology 3.1

The Electrical Technology Program is focused on employable skills and knowledge needed to be successful in the Electrical Industry. The 12th grade fall course begins in the classroom every day for a period of related instruction on electrical service. As students grasp a firm understanding on how to calculate the power supply to homes and places of business they apply their knowledge in the shop. This

is done mainly by providing power to a mock home that is located in the shop. Students calculate, design, install, and make operational an electrical service.Students are closely monitored for progression and safety.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Electrical Technology 2.2

Semester 1:  Course #1665    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Electrical Technology 3.2

The Electrical Technology Program is focused on employable skills and knowledge needed to be successful in the Electrical Industry.  The 12th grade fall course begins in the classroom every day for a period of related instruction on motor controls. This is partly done by covering text information on the subject of the designing and installation of motors. Students then apply their individual knowledge in motors wiring basic to moderate electrical motors circuits.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1666    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

HEALTH ASSISTING 

 

Health Care Exploration

This course is for students who are exploring health careers and majors. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate and reflect on their own skills, interests and values to determine how they might shape their educational and career paths. The course will help clarify student understanding of specific careers in the field of health. The course will also provide a basic introduction of the U.S. Healthcare system, including opportunities and challenges in this system. The objective of this course is to help students decide if a career in the health field is a good fit for them and learn the educational requirements of specific health career degrees.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1670    5.0 credits (double block) 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Womb to Tomb: Health Care through the Lifespan I        

This course focuses on health and wellness conception to school age and culminates into the potential for becoming certified as a feeding assistant and dietary aid. Mental health & behavior & Practicum for Nursing Assistant – Early childhood, Intro to Medical Terminology Part I will be included.

This is an initial program for the medical profession that focuses on the development of values and principles that will be utilized in any and all areas of the medical field. Students will become proficient in basic nursing assistant tasks through lecture, small group activities, practice, media, and hands-on-experience.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1671    5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

Womb to Tomb: Health Care through the Lifespan II       

This course focuses on health and wellness from conception to school age and culminates into the potential for becoming certified as a feeding assistant and dietary aid, along with BLS CPR and first aid.This semester focuses on adolescence to geriatric including death and dying, mental health & behavior & Practicum for Nursing Assistant.This course will continue to build the students use of  Medical Terminology.

This is an initial program for the medical profession that focuses on the development of values and principles that will be utilized in any and all areas of the medical field.Students will become proficient in basic nursing assistant tasks through lecture, small group activities, practice, media, and hands-on-experience.

 

PREREQUISITES: The student must have a proof of the following: current physical, PPD, immunization according to MA Dept. of Public Health, current flu vaccine, BLS CPR certification, First Aid Certification, Feeding Certification, and OSHA 10.

Semester 2:  Course #1672    5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Foundation of Nursing Practice I                                                          

This course provides students with foundations to the art and science of nursing. Students are introduced to the nursing process, basic human needs, and basic nursing care of the adult client.This course includes lecture, lab, clinical, and simulation.This course encompasses building on the principles of womb to tomb increasing  understanding of medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, the healthcare team and how it corresponds to the practicum or hands on skill development. Students will participate in a practicum at a long term care facility.This course builds on the previous knowledge and goes from task orientated to a client based team approach to care. Students will be responsible for reading a resident’s chart and delivering care in accordance with the care plan. The focus develops resident care skills as well as the student’s interpersonal skills.

 

PREREQUISITES: Current physical, PPD, Cori checks, and flu vaccine. Passing grades in Womb to Tomb I, BLS CPR and First Aid certification and feeding certification. Able safely lift 40lbs. Osha 10.

Semester 1:  Course #1673    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Foundations of Nursing Practice II                                                      

This course introduces the student to the role of the professional nurse aid. The emphasis on health promotion across the lifespan includes learning about self-health, as well as holistic client health practices. Students learn to access and apply research evidence to guide safe preventative care. The student will incorporate communication and normal changes associated with aging; in a caring and culturally sensitive manner. The student will work as an ethical member of multidisciplinary teams giving and receiving feedback about performance and use reflective thinking about their practice. Alzheimer’s & Dementia & Behavioral health (Alzheimer’s Certification). This course focuses is to provide an understanding of how the brain works, normal changes associated with aging and the how disease affects the brain. This course will enhance the nurse aid’s ability to respond with appropriate actions and communication to cognitively impaired clients.

 

PREREQUISITES: Current Physical, PPD, Cori checks, and flu vaccine. Passing grades in Womb to Tomb I and II, Foundations of Nursing Practice I, and BLS CPR and First Aid certification and feeding certification.  Able safely lift 40lbs. Osha 10.

Semester 2:  Course #1674    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Practicum for Nursing Assistants I – Direct Care Workers             

This course builds on the previous knowledge and goes from a task orientation to a client based team approach to care.  Students will be responsible for reading a resident’s chart and delivering care in accordance with the care plan. The focus is not only development of resident care skill, but the student’s interpersonal skills.   It also culminates into the potential for certifications as a Home Health Aide, Transitional Care, Mental health, C.N.A. Certifications, if not done in junior year Alzheimer’s. The Direct Care Worker Certificate prepares students to perform the responsibilities of both a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) and a Home Health Aide (HHA). Under the supervision of a Registered Nurse (RN) or a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN). Direct Care Workers help fulfill basic quality of life needs for those who need help due to illness, disability or infirmity. The certificate combines specialized training that meets both state and federal standards with academic coursework that students need to successfully compete for entry level positions in healthcare. Students will have the opportunity to recertify in BLS CPR and First Aid.

 

PREREQUISITES: Current physical, PPD, Cori checks, and flu vaccine. Feeding Certificate. Passing score in Foundations of Nursing Practice I and II.

Semester 1:  Course #1675    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Practicum for Nursing Assistants II – Direct Care Workers

Description:  In this course student will learn the principles of how to take and EKG, interpret an EKG, polarization of the heart, how to prep a client for an ekg, lab draw or physical exam, how to draw a lab specimen, collect other specimens and positions for clients during physical exams including documentation of demographic, health and baseline data. Students will also be introduced to common medication, their names, classifications, administrations, dosages and how to take a verbal order and document in accordance with Massachusetts state law. Students will also develop transferable skills  needed in job and life situation tasks. These skills include: basic academic skills, thinking skills, personal qualities, use of resources, interpersonal skills and using information.  Students will create a target resume, cover letter and thank you letter.  They will learn how to do a job search, interview, act in social

setting at work and dress professionally. They will also create a five-year plan and career portfolio.  Students may choose to do a co-operative education experience or internship. (Note must be passing all courses and have a B in shop in order to qualify.) An EMT course unit is offered by an outside partner agency.

 

PREREQUISITES:  Certification as a nursing assistant and at least 18 years of age. Current Physical, PPD, Cori checks, and flu vaccine. Feeding Certificate.  Foundations of Nursing Practice I and II  passing score.

Semester 2:  Course #1676    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

PROGRAMMING & WEB DEVELOPMENT 

 

Programming and Web Development Exploration

Students will be introduced to Computer Programming using Scratch, Python, and Creating Web Pages with HTML5/CSS.  In Computer Programming they will implement programming structures such as working with logical operators, compound conditions, and conditional branching. In working with HTML/CSS students will learn HTML syntax in accordance with W3C standards along with incorporating an image in a web page and using CSS in accordance with W3C standards.

 

Semester:  Course #1690       5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Programming and Web Development 1.1

Students will continue learning computer programming with Scratch and Python learning the use of conditional loops, compound conditions, and other programming concepts. In addition students will be introduced to Adobe Photoshop for editing pictures and creating visual effects that can be incorporated into web pages.

 

 

Semester 1:  Course #1691    5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Programming and Web Development 1.2

Students will continue Scratch and Python in Computer Programming, Adobe Photoshop in working with images, and creating navigation bars in HTML/CSS web design.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1692    5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Programming and Web Development 2.1

Students will be introduced to creating websites with CMS (content management systems) such as Joomla and WordPress. Students will also learn about operating systems, security concepts fundamental to networks, basic computer architecture by disassembling and reassembling PC’s.

 

PREREQUISITES Successful completion of Programming and Web Development 1.2

Semester 1:  Course #1693    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Programming and Web Development 2.2

CMS (content management systems) will be covered thoroughly with students being assigned responsibility of making all content changes to the school website which was programmed in Joomla. In addition, they will be continue learning about computer hardware and troubleshooting and go out into the school to fix, update, and install hardware and software from works orders from the technology department.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1694    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Programming and Web Development 3.1

Students who maintain a B or better average in academics and shop, passed MCAS, no excessive absences and  acceptable conduct may be considered for Co-Op. Every effort will be made to try to match students abilities to employer jobs in the Holyoke area. Students in their senior year will continue studying web design using HTML/CSS and  will be introduced to JavaScript. CMS (content management system) software will continue to be studied and will focus on WordPress. In the programming area students will study Video Game Design using Microsoft Visual Studio and C#. Students should also have developed a level of employability that includes; the ability to effectively communicate in the workplace, and demonstrate work ethic and professionalism.

 

PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of Programming and Web Development 2.2

Semester 1:  Course #1695    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Programming and Web Development 3.2

Students in their last course for Programming and Web Development will create a senior project in the field of technology that goes beyond what they have learned in the classroom. All topics must be approved by the instructor. They could include creating a website for a local non profit agency in Holyoke as well as doing programming work for local companies or agencies.

 

Semester 2:  Course #1696    7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

The English program addresses the traditional elements of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and reasoning.  It develops understandings and applications in the language arts and in composition and communication, and exposes students to quality literature and consequently involves them with issues of the human condition.

 

ENGLISH – Core Course Sequence

 

Applications of Language:  English I  

The course is designed to foster understandings and applications in the language arts and in composition and communication, and to familiarize students with a variety of literature and its components. Independent reading is required.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1110                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1111                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Application of Language:  English I Honors

The course is designed to foster understandings and applications in the language arts and in composition and communication, and to familiarize students with a variety of literature and its components. They will be expected to undertake outside reading and projects that include library and literary research. Summer assignments are mandatory.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Honors criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1110-1            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1111-1            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

Ethnic Studies: English I

This course is a 9th grade English class where students earn the required English credits towards graduation. In this course students will learn to “read the word and the world” by engaging with various types of texts, analyzing systems of oppression, and ways of resistance. Like all Ethnic Studies classes, students will hone their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. Students in this course are also enrolled in the 9th grade Ethnic Studies (Social Studies) class.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1114                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1115                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ethnic Studies:  English I  Honors      

This course is a 9th grade English class where students earn the required English credits towards graduation. In this course students will learn to “read the word and the world” by engaging with various types of texts, analyzing systems of oppression, and ways of resistance. Like all Ethnic Studies classes, students will hone their Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening skills. Honors students will be expected to engage in outside reading, assignments, and projects that include library and literary research. Students in this course are also enrolled in the Honors 9th grade US History Ethnic Studies class.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Honors criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1114-1 2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1115-1            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

Literature and Composition:  English II                                                                        Sophomore English students are expected to meet the requirements of an intensive, comprehensive program of grammar, literature, vocabulary, and composition. Independent reading is required. This course is taught through the unique lens of the MLS, PMA, and TED academies. Students will be scheduled with cohort members. Performance tasks will connect to the theme-based exploration and application of content.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1120                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1121                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Literature and Composition:  English II Honors    

Advanced sophomore English students are expected to meet the requirements of an intensive, comprehensive program of grammar, literature, vocabulary and composition. They will be expected to undertake outside reading and projects that include library and literary research.This course is taught through the unique lens of the MLS, PMA, and TED academies.  Students will be scheduled with cohort members.  Performance tasks will connect to the theme-based exploration and application of content.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Honors criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1120-1            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1121-2            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ethnic Studies:  English II     

This English class builds on the concepts of Ethnic Studies that students have learned in either their 8th and/or 9th grade Ethnic Studies classes. In this course students will continue to “read the word and the world” by engaging with various types of texts, analyzing systems of oppression, and ways of resistance. Like all Ethnic Studies classes, students will hone their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. All students will participate in a culminating Youth Participatory Action Research Project.  This is the English course for all sophomore students enrolled in the Community and Global Studies Academy.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1124                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1125                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Ethnic Studies:  English II Honors 

This English class builds on the concepts of Ethnic Studies that students have learned in either their 8th and/or 9th grade Ethnic Studies classes. In this course students will continue to “read the word and the world” by engaging with various types of texts, analyzing systems of oppression, and ways of resistance. Like all Ethnic Studies classes, students will hone their Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening skills. All students will participate in a culminating Youth Participatory Action Research Project. Honors students will be expected to engage in outside reading, assignments, and projects that include library and literary research.  This English course is an optio nfor sohpomore students enrolled in the Community and Global Studies Academy.

 

PREREQUISITE: Honors criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1124-1            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1125-1            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

 Argument and Rhetoric:  English III       

Do you improve your argument if you raise your voice, or do you improve your voice if you raise an argument through meaningful, evidence-based claims? Here’s your chance to learn the difference, by engaging with a range of topics, texts, and media to analyze rhetorical strategies that give arguments their power of persuasion. Find out about methods and strategies authors use to influence you, the audience, before becoming the author yourself, through oral, written, and project-based tasks.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1130                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1131                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Argument and Rhetoric:  English III Honors

Do you improve your argument if you raise your voice, or do you improve your voice if you raise an argument through meaningful, evidence-based claims? Here’s your chance to learn the difference, by engaging with a range of topics, texts, and media to analyze rhetorical strategies that give arguments their power of persuasion. Find out about methods and strategies authors use to influence you, the audience, before becoming the author yourself, through oral, written, and project-based tasks.

 

PREREQUISITE:   Honors criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1130-1            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1131-1            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

Advanced Placement (AP) English Language & Composition 

Course description as per College Board: The AP English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods. Students must also complete several assignments over the summer to supplement what they will learn in the class. AP credit is contingent upon participation in the AP Exam for the course in May.

 

PREREQUISITE:   AP Criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1134                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1135                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

 

World Literature:  English IV  

This World Literature course gives students a chance to increase the depth of their global cultural awareness, and to examine global literary perspectives and traditions. The course provides students an opportunity for development of a deeper understanding of other cultures and its primary objective is to give students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the richness of global diversity through a study of some of the world’s finest literature. The course is designed around a series of Essential Questions, “big ideas” that help students to reflect on the human experience. Students will spend time engaged in dialogue, both in discussion and written reflections, about the texts and the cultures that produced them. The course will focus on several forms of literature, including novels, plays, poetry, short stories, spoken word, and non-fiction writing.  Students will be challenged to see the lives of the people

of other cultures as they are really lived, through the eyes of the other. Such perspectives will, of course, broaden their understanding of the diversity of cultures they may come in contact with in the increasingly diverse local community and global world in which they live.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1140                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1141                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

World Literature:  English IV Honors

This World Literature course gives students a chance to increase the depth of their global cultural awareness, and to examine global literary perspectives and traditions. The course provides students an opportunity for development of a deeper understanding of other cultures and its primary objective is to give students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the richness of global diversity through a study of some of the world’s finest literature. The course is designed around a series of Essential Questions, “big ideas” that help students to reflect on the human experience. Students will spend time engaged in dialogue, both in discussion and written reflections, about the texts and the cultures that produced them. The course will focus on several forms of literature, including novels, plays, poetry, short stories, spoken word, and non-fiction writing.  Students will be challenged to see the lives of the people of other cultures as they are really lived, through the eyes of the other. Such perspectives will, of course, broaden their understanding of the diversity of cultures they may come in contact with in the increasingly diverse local community and global world in which they live. The course is demanding in time, and accelerated students should have a deep commitment to exploring, in depth, the world of literature and formal composition.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Honors criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1140-1 2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1141-1 2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

Advanced Placement (AP) English Literature & Composition   

Course description as per College Board: The AP English Literature and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works. Students must also complete several assignments over the summer to supplement what they will learn in the class. AP credit is contingent upon participation in the AP Exam for the course in May.

 

PREREQUISITE:  AP criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1144                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1145                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENGLISH – ELECTIVES

Business Communications 

This course provides an overview of the wide range of communication skills used by business personnel to present ideas clearly, logically and persuasively. It emphasizes communication techniques that lead to sound decision making and effective teamwork. Instruction is geared to improving students’ abilities to analyze, research, organize, write, listen, and speak while using a variety of business and graphics software applications effectively.

 

Semester:  Course #1167                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Contemporary Urban Literature 

Studying urban literature and culture is important to validate the experiences and knowledge of urban youth, to promote critical thinking about urban arts –music, art, dance and culture—through reading, writing, speaking and listening, and to provide the roots of social change.  It speaks about and against racial, economic and political oppression. During the semester, students will understand the roles of POWER and ACTIVISM in urban literature and culture. They will read a novel and write an analysis regarding the elements that make it a work of urban literature as well as read short stories and poems written as works of urban literature. They will analyze, write and perform hip hop / spoken word poetry, analyze hip hop lyrics, and write a song review. They will examine the elements of hip hop including: breakdancing, graffiti, social justice.

 

Semester:  Course #1166                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Documentary Film

A look at the history, development, and impact of documentary film. Students will view and study the social, political, and cultural implications of various films, as well as the documentary filmmaking process as a whole. The course will look at the various forms that documentaries can take: as forms of art, journalism, advocacy, and personal expression.

 

Semester:  Course #1168                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Journalism                                                                                                  

Journalism is where Holyoke High’s award winning newspaper The Herald and the school yearbook, The Annual, are created. Students interested in Journalism must have strong writing skills, a strong sense of self-motivation, and a desire to be an active member of the school community. The course is run workshop-style with a focus on journalistic writing, opinion writing, sports reporting, social media marketing, and photography. This course offers students a unique chance for their work to be viewed electronically by the entire school and outside community. Publication staffers must be committed, hard-working, and able to meet deadlines.

 

PREREQUISITE: Enrollment in the Performing and Media Arts Academy for sophomores

Semester 1:  Course #1160                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1161                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Media Literacy                                                                             

Media Literacy is intended as a half-year elective for sophomores within the Performing and Media Arts Academy. In this course, students gain exposure to and practice working with modern media platforms. Tasks include writing journalistically, writing for a specific audience in an electronic format, hosting a podcast and the basics of interviewing, photojournalism, sports journalism, and using social media as a productive and professional tool.

 

Semester:  Course #1164                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Reading Workshop

This intervention course is designed to accelerate the acquisition of literacy skills required for success in high school coursework.  Students are placed into cohort based workshops based on multiple assessments (including but not limited to STAR, MCAS, and diagnostic assessments).

 

Semester 1:  Course #1100                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1101                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Social Commentary and Satire

Have you ever seen The Simpsons, read Animal Farm, seen Saturday Night Live, Blackfish, or Shrek? These are all examples of satire: the use of humor though irony, sarcasm and ridicule to discredit individuals, trends, institutions and societies. Students of this course will read, discuss and reflect on a variety of sources including drama, poetry, film and television.  Using multimedia and varied close readings students will develop and refine critical thinking skills, analytical skills, and become more proficient in essay writing.

 

Semester:  Course #1165                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Video Journalism                                                                                            

Video Journalism is a year-long course that works as the visual branch of Holyoke High’s newspaper, The Herald. Throughout the course, students will develop video production and digital communication skills in an environment similar to that of a television newsroom. The work done in the course will culminate into a weekly web news show and social media posts that are produced by students from both Video Journalism and Journalism classes. Note: Students will be required to sign a contract of responsibility for equipment use.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1162                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1163                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT

The English Language Development (ELD) Program offers English Learners (ELs) the opportunity to participate fully in the educational process at Holyoke High School.  In order to be academically successful, English Learners must become proficient in English and master academic content simultaneously. Our ELD program provides systematic, explicit and sustained language instruction in ESL classes as well as access to a broad range of academic courses through sheltered content.

The ELD Program follows the philosophy that English language development takes place throughout the student’s day and consists of two components: Sheltered English Instruction (SEI) and English as a Second Language Instruction (ESL). The Newcomer Academy, a specialized course of study for qualified English learners, also offers Spanish Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) courses in Math, Science and Social Studies. TBE courses, instructed in Spanish, allow students to achieve at the same rate as the mainstream program student. All our courses are aligned to the WIDA English Language Development Standards and the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.

Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) methods are used in English, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and elective courses to provide access to grade-level content as well as discipline-specific academic language. SEI is taught by highly qualified content-teachers who are licensed in the appropriate area and hold SEI Endorsements.

English as a Second Language (ESL) courses are designed to provide systematic, dedicated and sustained study of the English language taught by licensed ESL teachers. ESL is its own subject and all ESL courses follow a dedicated curriculum focused on language and literacy development connected and aligned to both WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards and grade-level content standards.

 

 

NEWCOMER ACADEMY COURSES

 

Newcomer English as a Second Language I

Newcomer ESL I is a dedicated ESL course designed to meet the specific English language instructional needs of beginning English learners who are new to US schools (Newcomers). ESL I instruction focuses on developing students’ ability to listen, read, speak and write in English for both social and academic purposes. Emphasis is placed on guiding students through the acculturation process and building oral language as a foundation for academic English development.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1190                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1191                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Newcomer Literature and Composition I

Newcomer Lit/Com 1 is an SCI Language Arts course designed to meet the specific English language instructional needs of beginning English learners who are new to US schools (Newcomers). The course

 

 

will foster understandings and applications in the language arts and in composition and communication, and familiarize students with a variety of literature in order to build content-specific vocabulary and concepts.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1192                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1193                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Newcomer English as a Second Language  II

Newcomer ESL II is a dedicated ESL course designed to meet the specific English language instructional needs of beginning English learners. ESL II instruction is focused on students’ academic, social and instructional English language needs within the context of content area topics.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1194                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1195                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Newcomer Literature & Composition II           

Newcomer Lit/Com 2 is an SCI Language Arts course designed to meet the specific English language instructional needs of beginning English learners. The course will foster understandings and applications in   the language arts and in composition and communication, and  familiarize students with a variety of  literature as a bridge to meaningful participation in grade-level Language Arts.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1196                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1197                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) Spanish Algebra I

This course provides a formal development of the algebraic skills and concepts necessary for students to succeed in future math courses. Students continue their work started in grade 8 on linear equations in one and two variables. Other topics include systems of equations, applications, rational exponents, operations on polynomial expressions, solving quadratic equations, and data analysis. Students also work with functions including quadratic and exponential functions. This course is instructed in Spanish.

 

Semester:  Course #1214                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester:  Course #1215                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) Geometry

This course is based on Euclidean Geometry. It emphasizes the study of the properties and applications of common geometric figures in two and three dimensions. Topics include triangle congruence and similarity, application of similarity to right triangle trigonometry, extension of the Pythagorean Theorem to

 

 

special right triangles, properties of polygons, measurement including area, volume and surface area, transformations and constructions. Students will also prove basic geometry theorems and extend their work with probability. This course is instructed in Spanish.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1224                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1225                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) Spanish Standards-Based Math

This course is an in-depth review of the standards in the Massachusetts Frameworks for Mathematics required to support students in proficiency on the MCAS retest and EPP test. This course is instructed in Spanish.

 

Semester:  Course #1236                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester:  Course #1237                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) Spanish Biology

The primary objective of the course is to provide students with a fundamental understanding of modern biology and scientific processes. Semester I begins with an overview of the evolutionary history of biological diversity including the early earth, the origins of prokaryotic life, and eukaryotic diversity.  Next is the study of animal form and function, followed by ecology.  In semester two, the molecular basis of biology and the architecture of the cell are presented as the foundation for the analysis of more complex organismic functions and processes such as photosynthesis, respiration, and the cell cycle. This course is instructed in Spanish.

 

Semester:  Course #1314                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester:  Course #1315                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) Spanish Biology II

This is the second year of a two-year sequence which provides an insight into the process by which scientific knowledge is gained and an overview of the science of biology. This course begins with an overview of the evolutionary history of biological diversity including the early earth, the origins of prokaryotic life, and eukaryotic diversity. Plant form and function, animal form and function, and ecology complete the two-year biology sequence. To be successful in Biology I Standard w/lab, students must be able to: read effectively for information and understanding, communicate effectively as writers and speakers, and use critical thinking, problem-solving, and reasoning techniques effectively. This course is recommended for those students who may not be interested in pursuing a career in a science related field. This course is taught in Spanish.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1398                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1399                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) Spanish U.S. History I
This course will cover United States History from Colonial America to Reconstruction
with an emphasis on the Constitution. Topics covered will include the history of political
institutions, public policy, social and economic change, democracy and international
relations as well as cultural and intellectual development. This course is instructed in Spanish.

 

Semester:  Course #1412                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester:  Course #1413                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) U.S. History II
This course will cover United States History from Industrialization to the present. Students will continue their study of political institutions, public policy, social and economic change, democracy as well as cultural and intellectual development. This course is instructed in Spanish.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1422                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1423                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE COURSES

 

 

Freshman English as a Second Language

Freshman ESL is designed to develop 9th grade English learners’ language and literacy skills through contextualized and meaningful practices that integrate grade-level academic content standards. The course follows a dedicated ESL curriculum focused on students’ academic, social and instructional language needs within the context of content area topics.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1150                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1151                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Theme-based English as a Second Language                     

Theme-based ESL is designed to develop 10th grade English learners’ language and literacy skills through contextualized and meaningful practices that integrate grade-level academic content standards. Course content will be tied to the themes of each academy. The course follows a dedicated ESL curriculum focused on students’ academic, social and instructional language needs within the context of content area topics.
Semester 1:  Course #1152                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1153                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

English as a Second Language Literacy

ESL Literacy is designed to develop 11th and 12th grade English learners’ language and literacy skills through contextualized and meaningful practices that integrate grade-level academic content standards. The course follows a dedicated ESL curriculum focused on students’ academic, social and instructional language needs within the context of content area topics.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1154                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1155                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 ESL Reading Workshop

ESL Reading Workshop is designed for long-term English learners in order to focus on academic English language development in the domains of Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking aligned with WIDA English Language Development standards. Particular emphasis will be on academic reading and writing designed to accelerate the acquisition of literacy skills required for success in high school coursework.  Students are placed into cohort based workshops based on multiple assessments (including but not limited to ACCESS, STAR, MCAS, and diagnostic assessments).

 

Semester 1:  Course #1156                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1157                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Co-taught English as a Second Language

CT ESL is designed to meet the English language instructional needs of long-term English learners in an inclusive setting. Licensed ESL teachers provide systematic, explicit, and sustained direct instruction and assessment, based on WIDA ELD standards, in a co-taught classroom along with a licensed content teacher who delivers standards-based content instruction. Inclusion allows long-term English learners to strengthen their academic English while participating in mainstream, grade-level content classes.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1158                0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1159                0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

MATHEMATICS & COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

The Mathematics program provides a sequential approach at both exploratory and challenging levels to suit present and future educational, vocational, and cultural needs of Holyoke students.  The content is selected and organized with due regard for principles of learning such  as  those  concerning readiness,  motivation, rates  of  learning, and  degrees  of mastery. Attention is given in learning activities to fundamental principles of mathematics and, at the same time, significant applications are made within the learner’s range of understanding and interest.  Algebra I through Pre-Calculus courses are aligned to the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.

 

 

MATHEMATICS – CORE COURSE SEQUENCE

 

Algebra I

This course provides a formal development of the algebraic skills and concepts necessary for students to succeed in future math courses. Students continue their work started in grade 8 on linear equations in one and two variables. Other topics include systems of equations, applications, rational exponents, operations on polynomial expressions, solving quadratic equations, and data analysis. Students also work with functions including quadratic and exponential functions.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1210                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1211                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) Spanish Algebra I

This course provides a formal development of the algebraic skills and concepts necessary for students to succeed in future math courses. Students continue their work started in grade 8 on linear equations in one and two variables. Other topics include systems of equations, applications, rational exponents, operations on polynomial expressions, solving quadratic equations, and data analysis. Students also work with functions including quadratic and exponential functions.  This course is conducted in Spanish.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1214                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1215                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Algebra I Honors

This course provides a formal development of the algebraic skills and concepts necessary for students to succeed in advanced courses. This is an accelerated course that covers all of the topics in College Algebra I but topics are covered at a faster pace which allows for more depth and application of concepts. The major topics include linear equations in one and two variables, systems of equations,

 

 

 

 

applications, rational exponents, operations on polynomial expressions, solving quadratic equations, and data analysis. Students also work with functions and their properties including quadratic and exponential functions.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Honors criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1210-1 2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1211-1 2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

Geometry

This course is based on Euclidean Geometry. It emphasizes the study of the properties and applications of common geometric figures in two and three dimensions. Topics include triangle congruence and similarity, application of similarity to right triangle trigonometry, extension of the Pythagorean Theorem to special right triangles, properties of polygons, measurement including area, volume and surface area, transformations and constructions. Students will also prove basic geometry theorems and extend their work with probability.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1220                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1221                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) Spanish Geometry

This course is based on Euclidean Geometry. It emphasizes the study of the properties and applications of common geometric figures in two and three dimensions. Topics include triangle congruence and similarity, application of similarity to right triangle trigonometry, extension of the Pythagorean Theorem to special right triangles, properties of polygons, measurement including area, volume and surface area, transformations and constructions. Students will also prove basic geometry theorems and extend their work with probability. This course is taught in Spanish.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1224                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1225                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Geometry Honors 

This course is based on Euclidean Geometry. This is an accelerated course that covers all of the topics in College Geometry but topics are covered at a faster pace which allows for more depth and application of concepts. It emphasizes the study of the properties and applications of common geometric figures in two and three dimensions. Topics include triangle congruence and similarity, application of similarity to right triangle trigonometry, extension of the Pythagorean Theorem to special right triangles, properties of polygons, measurement including area, volume and surface area and transformations. Student will make geometric constructions and will use deductive reasoning to do geometric proofs.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Honors criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1220-1 2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1221-1 2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

Algebra II

This course is designed to build on algebraic skills taught in Algebra I and continues an abstract approach to problem solving. Students continue their work with polynomials and polynomial functions and it is extended to include the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. Previous work with functions is extended to exponential, logarithmic and rational functions. Students will investigate characteristics of the various functions including asymptotes, intercepts, and zeros and use these to sketch graphs. Other topics include complex numbers, rational expressions and equations and radical expressions and equations.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Passing grade in Algebra I

Semester 1:  Course #1230                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1231                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Algebra II Honors

This is an accelerated course that covers all of the topics in College Algebra II but topics are covered at a faster pace which allows for more depth and application of concepts. This course continues an abstract approach to problem solving. Work with polynomials and polynomial functions is extended to include the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra.  Previous work with functions is extended to exponential, logarithmic, rational and trigonometric functions including asymptotes, intercepts and zeros. Other topics include complex numbers, rational expressions and equations, radical expressions and equations.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Honors criteria and passing grade in Algebra I

Semester 1:  Course #1230-1 2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1231-1 2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

Probability & Statistics

This course focuses on data analysis.  Students will study statistical procedures and probabilistic situations.  The course emphasizes the use of either the computer or the graphic calculator to solve world/real life problems.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1244                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1245                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Pre-Calculus Honors

This course prepares students for AP Calculus or dual enrollment Calculus. Students continue their work with complex numbers and  polynomial  and  logarithmic  functions.  This  includes the role of e,  natural and common logarithms, laws of exponents and logarithms, and the solutions of logarithmic and exponential equations. Students will investigate and identify the characteristics of functions including

 

 

 

zeros, asymptotes, intercepts, symmetry, intervals for which the function is increasing or decreasing, maximum and minimum points and use these to sketch graphs.  This course includes a two month unit on Trigonometry.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Honors criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1242                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1243                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus

The curriculum follows the topical outline for Calculus AB. The students are required to take the AP Calculus Exam in the Spring. The major topics studied are functions, graphs and  limits, asymptotic  behavior and continuity, derivatives and integrals.  Students will use the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus to calculate definite and indefinite integrals. Students will also apply integrals to find the area of a region or volume of a solid of revolution. The depth of exploration is intense and occurs at a fast pace.

 

PREREQUISITE:  AP criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1252                            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1253                            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

 

MATHEMATICS – ELECTIVES

 

Financial Literacy

Financial Literacy is a real world math class designed to help students navigate their financial future. Topics include: Earning money, personal finance, saving for the future, spending money wisely, transportation, aspects of purchasing and owning a vehicle, housing and home improvements, investments, taxes and retirement.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1246                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1247                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Quantitative Reasoning (9th Grade Only)

This course is a mathematics acceleration / support class for students seeking to master pre-algebra.  Topics include operations with real numbers, solving equations and inequalities in one variable including proportions, applications, introduction to functions, graphing linear equations, lines and angle relationships, right triangles and transformations in space.  Students are placed into this course based on a combination of 8th grade teacher recommendation, 8th grade STAR scores, family input, and 9th grade teacher input.  9th grade STAR scores may also be used to determine student placement.  Students are to be simultaneously enrolled in Algebra I.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1200                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1201                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Standards Based Math 

This course is recommended for students that scored a 220 to 238 on the MCAS. This course is an in-depth review of the standards in the Massachusetts Frameworks for Mathematics required to support students in proficiency on the MCAS retest and EPP test.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1234                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1235                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) Spanish Standards Based Math

This course is an in-depth review of the standards in the Massachusetts Frameworks for Mathematics required to support students in proficiency on the MCAS retest and EPP test. This course is instructed in Spanish.

 

Semester:  Course #1236                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester:  Course #1237                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 COMPUTER SCIENCE – ELECTIVE COURSES

Introduction to Computer Science                                        

Exploring Computer Science is designed to introduce students to the field of computer science through an exploration of engaging and accessible topics. Students explore subjects such as; how does a computer work, do online personas affect our behaviors and how are cyber-crimes committed? We will also explore a variety of programming languages, solve computing challenges in teams, build spites, create and paint 3D models and build video games.   Rather than focusing the entire course on learning particular software tools or programming languages, the course is designed to focus on the conceptual ideas of computing and help students understand why certain tools or languages might be utilized to solve particular problems.

 

Semester:  Course #1260                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Mobile Computer Science Principles 

This course provides an introduction to basic principles of computer science (CS), including programming in App Inventor, a graphical programming language for Android mobile devices. This is a projects-based course. Students will learn CS principles by building socially useful mobile apps and reflecting on the impacts of their work. This course involves a strong writing component. Students will maintain a portfolio of their work, which will include several performance tasks in the areas of programming, data analysis, and the impact of computing technology.

 

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Algebra I.

Semester 1:  Course #1261                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1262                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

PHYSICAL EDUCATION & WELLNESS

To graduate from HHS, each student must meet the minimum annual physical education experience through a semester-based course or documented experience.

 

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION – ELECTIVES

 

Health

This course provides students with an understanding of current health issues as they relate to teens.  The objective of this course is to develop strong decision making skills based on accurate current information relative to teen issues.  Topics include wellness/safety, stress/mental health, violence, substance abuse, nutrition and human sexuality.  This is a required course for freshman students.

 

Semester:  Course #1370                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Physical Education:  Games and Sport

This course develops physical powers and skills in a variety of sports and activities, which facilitates an understanding of physical activity and helps provide a meaningful social experience. The activities and sports include:   flag football, soccer, tennis, conditioning, badminton, floor hockey, basketball, softball, indoor soccer, volleyball, team handball, lacrosse, ultimate Frisbee, swimming, weight training, table tennis, cross country skiing and new games. It facilitates the understanding of physical activity as being something that is done throughout one’s life. Students receive study guides for each of the activities that they participate in that contain pertinent information regarding the particular sport. Students are evaluated on class participation, knowledge testing and open response questions.

Fall Semester:  Course #1371            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Spring Semester:  Course #1372       2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Note:  Students may enroll in physical education either or both semesters.

 

 

Physical Education Experience

Students must complete a semester-long PE course each year.   Students can waive this requirement by completing an approved alternative to the course, including but not limited to school-sponsored athletics and community-based competitive athletics not offered by HHS.  A completed waiver is required.  See your counselor to request the form.  Students do not earn credits for this course towards graduation.

 

Year:  Course #1374               0 credits – 40 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reconnecting Youth

Reconnecting Youth (RY) is a leadership development program allowing students to learn and apply important life skills with a group of peers. Students engage in fun team building activities and talk openly about struggles and success. Whatever may be a challenge in your life – issues with parents, friends,

school, drugs, changing moods – we talk about it here! Students are given voice and choice in the organization of project-based learning projects that bring awareness to important issues and develop school-wide events such as Town Halls and participation in transformative experiences.

 

Semester:  Course #1373       2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

 

SCIENCE – CORE COURSE SEQUENCE

 

Biology

The primary objective of the course is to provide students with a fundamental understanding of modern biology and scientific processes. Semester I begins with an overview of the evolutionary history of biological diversity including the early earth, the origins of prokaryotic life, and eukaryotic diversity.  Next is the study of animal form and function, followed by ecology.  In semester two, the molecular basis of biology and the architecture of the cell are presented as the foundation for the analysis of more complex organismic functions and processes such as photosynthesis, respiration, and the cell cycle.

 

Semester:  Course #1310                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester:  Course #1311                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) Spanish Biology

The primary objective of the course is to provide students with a fundamental understanding of modern biology and scientific processes. Semester I begins with an overview of the evolutionary history of biological diversity including the early earth, the origins of prokaryotic life, and eukaryotic diversity.  Next is the study of animal form and function, followed by ecology.  In semester two, the molecular basis of biology and the architecture of the cell are presented as the foundation for the analysis of more complex organismic functions and processes such as photosynthesis, respiration, and the cell cycle. This course is instructed in Spanish.

 

Semester:  Course #1314                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester:  Course #1315                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Biology Honors

The primary objective of the course is to provide students with a fundamental understanding of modern biology and scientific processes. Semester I begins with an overview of the evolutionary history of biological diversity including the early earth, the origins of prokaryotic life, and eukaryotic diversity.  Next is the study of animal form and function, followed by ecology.  In semester two, the molecular basis of biology and the architecture of the cell are presented as the foundation for the analysis of more complex organismic functions and processes such as photosynthesis, respiration, and the cell cycle.  The enriched nature of the course means that the concepts are presented in significantly greater depth and detail. The instructional pace is also significantly faster with a much greater emphasis upon supplemental work done outside of the classroom.

 

PREREQUISITE: Honors criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1310-1            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course  #1311-1           2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

Biology II 

This is the second year of a two-year sequence which provides an insight into the process by which scientific knowledge is gained and an overview of the science of biology. Picking up where Biology I Standard w/lab left off, this course begins with an overview of the evolutionary history of biological diversity including the early earth, the origins of prokaryotic life, and eukaryotic diversity. Plant form and function, animal form and function, and ecology complete the two-year biology sequence. The instructional pace is slower than that of Biology I Honors w/lab with less emphasis on supplemental work done outside of the classroom. To be successful in Biology I Standard w/lab, students must be able to: read effectively for information and understanding, communicate effectively as writers and speakers, and use critical thinking, problem-solving, and reasoning techniques effectively. This course is recommended for those students who may not be interested in pursuing a career in a science related field.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1394                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1395                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) Spanish Biology II

This is the second year of a two-year sequence which provides an insight into the process by which scientific knowledge is gained and an overview of the science of biology. This course begins with an overview of the evolutionary history of biological diversity including the early earth, the origins of prokaryotic life, and eukaryotic diversity. Plant form and function, animal form and function, and ecology complete the two-year biology sequence. To be successful in Biology I Standard w/lab, students must be able to: read effectively for information and understanding, communicate effectively as writers and speakers, and use critical thinking, problem-solving, and reasoning techniques effectively. This course is recommended for those students who may not be interested in pursuing a career in a science related field. This course is taught in Spanish.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1398                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1399                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Biology II Honors

This is the second year of a two-year sequence which provides an insight into the process by which scientific knowledge is gained and an enriched overview of the science of biology. Picking up where Biology I Honors w/lab left off, this course begins with an overview of the evolutionary history of biological diversity including the early earth the origins of prokaryotic life, and eukaryotic diversity. Plant form and function, animal form and function, and ecology complete the two-year biology sequence. The enriched nature of the course means that the concepts are presented in significantly greater depth and detail. The instructional pace is also significantly faster with a much greater emphasis upon supplemental work done outside of the classroom.  This course is recommended only for those students interested in a challenging intellectual experience or a possible scientific career.

 

PREREQUISITES:  Honors criteria.  Completion of Biology I.

Semester 1:  Course #1394-1 2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1395-1 2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

Chemistry                                                                                        

This course is a standards-based study of fundamental chemical concepts, such as atomic theory

and its relation to chemical behavior, chemical bonding, the mole and stoichiometry, gas kinetics, energy relationships, solution dynamics, acids-bases, equilibrium, organic and biological chemistry, and nuclear interactions. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of mathematical, analytical, data acquisition, and communication skills as well as interdisciplinary approaches to discovery. Concepts and skills are reinforced by a strong emphasis on hands-on laboratory experiences and the integration of other branches of science.

 

Semester:  Course #1320                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester:  Course #1321                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Chemistry Honors                                                                        

This course is a standards-based study of fundamental chemical concepts, such as atomic theory and its relation to chemical behavior, chemical bonding, the mole and stoichiometry, gas kinetics, energy relationships, solution dynamics, acids-bases, equilibrium, organic and biological chemistry, and nuclear interactions. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of mathematical, analytical, data acquisition, and communication skills as well as interdisciplinary approaches to discovery. Concepts and skills are reinforced by a strong emphasis on hands-on laboratory experiences and the integration of other branches of science. The enriched nature of this course means that the concepts are presented in significantly greater depth and detail than Standard chemistry. The instructional pace is also significantly faster with a much greater emphasis upon mathematical skills and supplemental work done outside the classroom.

 

PREREQUISITE: Honors criteria

Semester:  Course #1320-1               2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester:  Course #1321-1               2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

Physics                                                                                                     

In this lab-based science course, students will study the basic physical concepts of matter and energy and the laws governing them. Topics will include: forces and laws of nature, equilibrium, motion, momentum, sound and light, and magnetic and electric phenomena. Students will conduct lab investigations, collect and analyze data, and explore content information from a variety of text and media sources.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Successful completion of Algebra I

Semester:  Course #1326                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester:  Course #1327                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

Physics Honors                                                                                      

In this lab-based science course, students will study the basic physical concepts of matter and energy and the laws governing them. Topics will include: forces and laws of nature, equilibrium, motion, momentum, sound and light, and magnetic and electric phenomena. Students will conduct lab investigations, collect and analyze data, and explore content information from a variety of text and media sources.  The enriched nature of the course means that the concepts are presented in significantly greater depth and detail. The instructional pace is also significantly faster with a much greater emphasis upon supplemental work done outside of the classroom.

 

PREREQUISITES:  Honors criteria.  Completion of Algebra I.

Semester:  Course #1326-1               2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester:  Course #1327-1               2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

SCIENCE – ELECTIVE COURSES

 

 

Advanced Placement (AP) Biology

AP Biology is a year-long course for exceptionally motivated students. AP Biology at Holyoke High School is designed to help students achieve success on the AP Biology examination, which is administered in mid-May. The course is intended to provide interesting and challenging experiences that are beyond the scope of Standard and Honor Biology courses at the high school level. The AP program considers the laboratory part of the curriculum as one of its major focuses. The course consists of the following units: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Genetics, Evolution, Biological Diversity, and Ecology. This course is recommended only for those students interested in a challenging intellectual experience or possible science career. To be successful in AP Biology, students must be able to: read effectively for information and understanding, communicate effectively as writers and speakers, and use critical thinking, problem-solving, and reasoning techniques effectively. Students must also complete several assignments over the summer to supplement what they will learn in the class.  AP credit is contingent upon participation in the AP Exam for the course in May.

 

PREREQUISITE: AP criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1340                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1341                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

 

Advanced Placement (AP) Environmental Science

The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a one semester, introductory college course in environmental science. The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative

 

 

solutions for resolving or preventing them. Students must also complete several assignments over the summer to supplement what they will learn in the class.  AP credit is contingent upon participation in the AP Exam for the course in May.

 

PREREQUISITE:  AP criteria.  Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry.

Semester 1:  Course #1342                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1343                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

 

Advanced Placement (AP) Physics

The College Board’s AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits.  Laboratory experience is a required component of the course. Colleges may require students to present their laboratory materials from AP science courses before granting college credit for laboratory, so students are encouraged to retain their laboratory notebooks, reports, and other materials.

 

PREREQUISITE:  AP criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1344                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1345                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

Human Anatomy and Physiology                                                      

In this lab-based full-year science course, students will study the cells, tissues, organs and organ systems of the human body and may engage in the dissections of vertebrate specimens. Students will learn anatomical terminology and explore various diseases of the human body. Students will also study the human body at the cellular, tissue, organ and systemic levels, focusing on structure, function, and a selection of related diseases of each organ system. Students will acquire a knowledge of medical terminology and utilize this specialized vocabulary in their oral and written work.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry

Semester 1:  Course #1330                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1331                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Plant and Animal Science

This course provides an overview of the biological principles that distinguish living thing from nonliving things. The plant and animal kingdoms are studied with emphasis placed on the comparison of the structure and function of representative organisms. The course will offer an understanding of the development of scientific thought, scientific inquiry, and  the  application  of  scientific  principles.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1332                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1333                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Robotics                                                                                         

In the future we people will not make or build things. We will tell robots how to make or build them for us. Robots already make cars, planes, and even pre-fabricated homes. If you would like to be a designer for our world of the future you should start to learn about robotics. In this class we will learn about the basic mechanical factors that go into designing a robot. We will also cover how to program the micro-controllers (mini-computers) that tell the parts of the robot how to move, and what triggers their movement. The most important thing you will learn in this class is how much fun (and frustration) it is to get machines to do jobs for you. You do not need any background in programming or mechanics to be a great success in this course.

 

Semester:  Course #1336                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Urban Ecology                                                                            

This course explores the local and global human impacts  on the environment. Evaluates multiple levels of decision making that lead to formulating environmental policies. Urban designing, planning, and application of ideas  to further the developments of  sustainability with our natural resources.

 

Semester:  Course #1334                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester:  Course #1334                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT

The Social Studies Department is charged with the essential responsibility of teaching democratic principles.  In addition, the Social Studies Department stresses the following goals: the development of critical thought, broad acceptance of and respect for other people’s’ culture, enlightened patriotism, active informed citizenship, knowledge of significant developments in human history, acquisition and understanding of fundamental skills, and an appreciation of the interrelationship of all disciplines.

The pivotal course, which all students must successfully complete, is United States History.  This course is required for graduation from a secondary school in the Commonwealth. Students must pass three full year courses to meet HHS graduation requirements.

 

SOCIAL STUDIES – CORE COURSE SEQUENCE

 

United States History I

This course will cover United States History from Colonial America to Reconstruction with an emphasis on the Constitution. Topics covered will include the history of political institutions, public policy, social and economic change, democracy and international relations as well as cultural and intellectual development.  Students will consistently analyze historical documents through reading and writing.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1410                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1411                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) Spanish U.S. History I
This course will cover United States History from Colonial America to Reconstruction with an emphasis on the Constitution. Topics covered will include the history of political institutions, public policy, social and economic change, democracy and international relations as well as cultural and intellectual development. This course is instructed in Spanish.

 

Semester:  Course #1412                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester:  Course #1413                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

United States History I Honors

This course is an advanced course which covers the full range of United States history from Colonial America to Reconstruction. The course will also cover the history of political institutions, behavior and public policy, social and economic change, democracy and international relations, as well as cultural and intellectual development. This course provides students with the analytical skills and factual

knowledge necessary to address critically problems and topics in U.S. history. Students learn to assess historical documents  and  to  weigh  the  evidence  and  interpretations  presented  in  historical

 

 

scholarship. Additional requirements include independent reading, class participation and discussion, extensive document-based writing, and projects.  The course is designed to help prepare students for an AP track in history grades 10-12.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Honors criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1410-1            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1411-1 2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

United States History –  Ethnic Studies

This course is a 9th  grade History class where students earn history elective credits towards graduation.  In  this  class,  students  study the  themes  of  causality,  solidarity, resistance, and action. Students examine how systems of power and oppression become institutionalized and are upheld over time. In addition, students learn about the ways people of color and marginalized groups (both in the US and abroad) are impacted by a legacy of colonialism and they ways that people of color, young folks, and other marginalized groups have organized movements to resist systemic oppression. Like all Ethnic  Studies classes, students will hone their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. All students will participate in a culminating Youth Participatory Action Research Project. Students in this course are also enrolled in the 9th grade Ethnic Studies English I simultaneously.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1416                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1417                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

United States History – Ethnic Studies Honors

This course is a 9th  grade History class where students earn history elective credits towards graduation.  In  this  class,  students  study the  themes  of  causality,  solidarity, resistance, and action. Students examine how systems of power and oppression become institutionalized and are upheld over time. In addition, students learn about the ways people of color and marginalized groups (both in the US and abroad) are impacted by a legacy  of  colonialism  and  they  ways  that  people  of  color,  young  folks,  and  other marginalized groups have organized movements to resist systemic oppression. Like all Ethnic  Studies   classes,  students will  hone their  reading,  writing,  speaking,  and listening skills. All students will participate in a culminating Youth Participatory Action Research  Project.  Honors  students  will  be  expected  to  engage  in  outside  reading, assignments, and projects that include library and literary research. Students in this course are also enrolled in the 9th grade Ethnic Studies English I simultaneously.

.

PREREQUISITE:  Honors criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1416-1            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1417-1            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

United States History II

This course will cover United States History from Industrialization in the late 1800’s to the present. Students will continue their study of political institutions, public policy, social and economic change, democracy as well as cultural and intellectual development. Students will consistently analyze historical documents through reading and writing.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1420                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1421                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) Spanish U.S. History II
This course will cover United States History from Industrialization to the present. Students will continue their study of political institutions, public policy, social and economic change, democracy as well as cultural and intellectual development. This course is instructed in Spanish.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1422                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1423                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

United States History II Honors

This advanced course will cover United States History from Industrialization in the late 1800’s to the present. Students will continue their study of  political institutions, public policy,  social and economic change, democracy as well as cultural and intellectual development. In this advanced course, students are expected to further develop their historical thinking skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a more rigorous and reflective academic setting. Additional requirements include independent reading, class participation and discussion, extensive document-based writing, and projects.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Honors criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1420-1                        2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1421-1            2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

Advanced Placement (AP) United States History

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level U.S. History courses, this AP course provides students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to address critically problems and material in U.S. history. Students learn to assess historical documents and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. The course examines the discovery and settlement of the New World through the recent past.  College Course equivalent:  AP History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university U.S. history course. Students may earn college credit upon passing the AP Exam given by the College Board at the conclusion of the course.

 

PREREQUISITE:  AP criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1426                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1427                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

World History

World History provides an overview of the history of human society in the past few

centuries  from  the  Renaissance  period  to  the  contemporary period.  Topics covered include  exploring the political, economic, social, religious, military, scientific, and cultural developments.  Students will consistently analyze historical documents through reading and writing.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1430                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1431                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

World History Honors

World History provides an overview of the history of human society in the past few centuries from the Renaissance period to the contemporary period.  Topics  covered include  exploring the political, economic, social, religious, military, scientific, and cultural developments.  In this advanced course, students are expected to further develop their historical thinking skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a more rigorous and reflective academic setting. Additional requirements include independent reading, class participation and discussion, extensive document-based writing, and projects.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Honors criteria

Semester:  Course #1430-1               2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester:  Course #1431-1               2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

Advanced Placement (AP) World History

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level World History courses, this course introduces students to world civilizations and cultures. The course reviews every major region in the world from the dawn of civilization to present day, focusing on the “Big Picture”, the things shared between civilizations, the causes of change, and the impact made when civilizations meet.   Common threads in history, such as trade, religion, politics, society, and technology, will be explored.

Students may earn college credit upon passing the AP Exam given by the College Board at the conclusion of the course.

 

AP is a college level course taught in high school.  As such, one of its greatest demands will be on your time. You will not succeed in this course unless you spend a minimum of 6-8 hours per week outside class studying World History.

 

PREREQUISITE: AP criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1434                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1435                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOCIAL STUDIES – ELECTIVES

 

American Government

This course pertains to the study of government institutions and political processes and their historical impact on American society. Content includes, but is not limited to, the functions and purpose of government, the function of the state, the constitutional framework, federalism, separation of powers, functions of the three branches of government at the local, state and national level, and the political decision-making process. It also provides an extensive overview of the structure, functions and ever-changing  American system of government. Course objectives are achieved through examination and analysis of politics, constitutional principles, right/responsibilities, the role of parties/interest groups, the importance of civic participation and the most current issues Americans and the governance of their country.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1441                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1442                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

American Government Honors

This advanced course pertains to the study of government institutions and political processes and their historical impact on American society. Content includes, but is not limited to, the functions and purpose of government, the function of the state, the constitutional framework, federalism, separation of powers, functions of the three branches of government at the local, state and national level, and the political decision-making process. It also provides an extensive overview of the structure, functions and ever-changing  American system of government.  Students are expected to further develop the critical skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a more rigorous and reflective academic setting. Students are empowered to perform at higher levels as they engage in the following: analyzing historical documents and supplementary readings, working in the context of thematically categorized information, participating in seminars/discussions, emphasizing free-response and document-based writing, contrasting opposing viewpoints, solving problems, etc. Students will develop and demonstrate their skills through participation in extended research-based papers/projects.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Honors criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1443                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1444                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

Economics

This course explores how individuals, government and financial institutions, and society make choices under conditions of scarce (limited) resources.  Key elements include the role of people as consumers, workers, investors, and voters.  Other key topics include the study of scarcity, supply and demand, market structures, money and trade.

 

Semester:  Course #1451                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

Introduction to Ethnic Studies

The Ethnic Studies elective is a semester long course. This course is open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have not taken 9th or 10th grade Ethnic Studies at HHS. In the Ethnic Studies elective, we will learn about the origins of Ethnic Studies as both a course and pedagogy rooted in the Civil Rights Movement. We will examine the trajectory and struggle for Ethnic Studies classes from 1968 to the present to understand why Ethnic Studies courses matter. More specifically, we will make connections to why Ethnic Studies is important in HPS. In addition to the teacher—students, guest speakers from the community, and professors from the Five Colleges will present on relevant topics. We will also take one field trip during the semester.

 

Semester I (Fall):  Course #1460                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Ethnic Studies Leadership Program 1                                 
Beginning 2018-2019 school year, students in the Ethnic Studies concentration enter year-one of the “Ethnic Studies Leadership Program,” a two-year program where students engage in Youth Participatory Action Research to address social issues of concern in their school and local communities, becoming leaders of social change in Holyoke. Student will read a variety of texts, including: film, television, literature, poetry, visual arts, and music as they continue to learn to read the “word and the world.” In addition to the classroom teacher, the program invites guest lecturers: community activists, students and professors from the 5 colleges, HCC, and Westfield State to share in the exchange of knowledge and ideas towards action. Program students are introduced to Ethnic Studies related fields of education, sociology, organizing and non-profit work. Activities include visits to four college campuses throughout

the school year and an orientation in service learning opportunities with community partnerships. This is a required course for all students in the Ethnic Studies concentration and student in the program can earn credits towards graduation in either the English or History department.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Introduction to Ethnic Studies or completion of Ethic Studies courses in grade 9

Semester 1:  Course #1461                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1462                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Making a Difference:  Public Policy                                       

This course looks at social change through the perspective of policies and strategies that have been shown to make a positive difference in people’s lives. It explores strategies for designing and measuring successful policies, as well as strategies for convincing others that proven policies are worth pursuing. It examines these strategies through the lens of specific policies that have proven successful regarding community building, economic prosperity, the environment, and the justice system. It asks students to consider the world they would like to live in and how they could help bring that world about. This class

 

 

 

will be connected to the Public Policy program at UMASS Amherst. Many expert guest speakers will come into the classroom and students will have the opportunity to go on field trips to the university and other related destinations.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Enrollment in the Community and Global Studies Academy (10th grade only)

Semester 1:  Course #1428                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1429                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

The World You Inherit: Global Contemporary Issues         

A current events course with content to be dictated, by some degree, to events taking place in the world. Emphasis will be placed on identifying economic, social, and political issues and problem solving. Units include: the world since 9/11; the challenges of climate change; sustainability of population growth; and problems of democracy in the information age.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1445                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1446                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Advanced Placement (AP) European History

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level European History courses, this course provides a study of political, social, economic and religious ideas and events influencing Europe from the high Renaissance to the recent past. The course aims at developing a better understanding of Europe through a study of the main factors contributing to its development.  In addition, a major focus will be placed on developing the skills to analyze historical evidence and the ability to express historical understanding through writing. AP European History is a college level course taught in high school.  Students may earn college credit upon passing the AP Exam given by the College Board at the conclusion of the course.

 

PREREQUISITE:  AP criteria

Semester 1:  Course #1452                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1453                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

The Citizen’s Guide to Holyoke                                              

In this reverse-inclusive junior-senior course focusing on local, national and global citizenship, learners will familiarize themselves with everything from the landmarks and bus schedules to the elected officials and active concerns of the citizens of Holyoke. Students will become familiar with and interview various community members in critical roles including community helpers like fire and police personnel, former mayors and even our state representative. Students will hear first-person accounts of  historical community impact projects, such as the Merry Go Round Restoration, from the organizers themselves. Students will learn about their own civic responsibilities through hands-on experiences such as registering voters and participating / contributing in city council meetings and their Civic Duties by visiting the local Courthouse and participating in mock trials. They will get the chance to practice traveling

around the city on the PVTA as well as by foot and will participate in letter writing campaigns and community improvement projects that directly addresses an issue of community concern that the class picks (by popular vote – of course!).

 

Spring Semester:  Course #1487       2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

History of Holyoke:  Dam It! 

The Paper City has a relatively short, but incredibly diverse history. This class will trace the roots of Holyoke from it pre-history geography and inhabitants; through its birth in the Industrial  Revolution;  and  its  decline  in  a  post-industrial  economy. A special emphasis will be placed on the many ethnic groups which have arrived, thrived, and succeeded ranging from the Irish through the Germans, French, Polish, Jewish, African-Americans to the Puerto Ricans.

 

Semester:  Course #1448                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Rights, Revolution, and Reaction (previously Holocaust and Human Rights)   

This course will explore the history and events of the Holocaust as well as selected thematic topics in Human Rights.  Students will explore memoirs, historical documents, poetry, documentary footage, novels, and other media that help illustrate the multiplicity and variety of human experience during the 20th century. Students will read analytically, think critically, and write persuasively as they explore the topics of the course.

 

Semester:  Course #1449                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

World Religions

An  introduction  to  twelve  major  religions  practiced  around  the  world.  The  course provides an overview of the purpose, definition, and commonalities of all religion. Each topic would include historical and geographic background as well as major tenets and practices. A major goal is to create an understanding, appreciation, and tolerance for religious differences.

 

Semester:  Course #1450                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

SPECIAL EDUCATION

Special education supports at Holyoke High School are offered along a continuum of service.  This section of the course handbook describes four substantially separate programs for students based on their Individualized Education Plan (IEP) offered at Holyoke High School:  (1)  TIP program, (2) Functional academic program, (3) RISE program, and (4) SHINE program. Schedules will vary depending on the individual needs and the program in which the student is place. Parents should speak with the school SETL to understand more about each program.  In addition to the program descriptions and courses offered here, HHS also provides co-teaching and consultative support as required by the IEP to students enrolled in other courses.

 

(1) Therapeutic Intervention Program (TIP)

The Therapeutic Intervention Program (TIP) is a program developed to support the academic and social/ emotional needs of students diagnosed with emotional and/or behavioral disabilities. This program is a substantially separate special education program that serves students in small group settings. While most students are included in the general education setting for academic courses, the TIP program provides programming to support the social/emotional needs of each student and the development of self-regulation skills.

 

(2) Functional Academics Program

The Functional Academics Program is a specialized, substantially separate, moderate needs special education program.  Students in the Functional Academics program are typically identified as having a primary intellectual impairment.  The program focuses on the development of academic and daily living skills through provision of significantly modified curriculum, teaching methodology/delivery of instruction and performance criteria.  Most students also receive services through a speech/language pathologist, occupational therapist or physical therapist.

The Functional Academics program serves students in grades 9-12 and is staffed according to a 12:3 student to staff ratio which includes:

  • One special education teacher with a moderate special education certification, and
  • Two special education paraprofessionals

 

 

Students receiving services in the Functional Academic program must meet entrance criteria in order to be placed in the program.  Student groupings are based on age, academic level and adaptive skills. The program schedule includes academic classes which are 49 minutes as well as a 45 minute life skills block. Students also participate in specials/elective classes with same age peers.

Grades 9-10 Grades 11-12
●     Essentials of ELA / Expressions of ELA

●     Explorations of US History / Investigations of US History

●     Accessing Fundamentals of Algebra / Fundamentals of Geometry and Algebra

●     Living Organisms / Biological Systems

●     Applications of ELA / Interpretations of ELA

●     Survey of World Literature / Applications of Citizenship & The Citizens’ Guide to Holyoke

●     Mathematical Thinking and Problem Solving / Elements and Applications of Financial Literacy

●     Explorations of Human Science / Explorations of Ecology and Engineering

 

(3) Reaching Individual Self-Efficacy (RISE) Program

The Secondary RISE Program is a highly specialized, substantially separate, special education program designed to meet and mitigate a range of individual learner needs. The primary focus of this program is to provide learner-specific accommodations, enhancements, modifications and supports to mitigate the impacts of significant disabilities on each learner’s ability to access CORE academic curricula as well as to cultivate or bolster Functional, Adaptive, Social and Vocational skill sets so as to  ensure achievement of  each individual learners’ greatest level of independence and greatest possible outcome.

Learners receiving services in the RISE program must have been exposed to a range of settings and interventions from least restrictive environment before being placed in this sub-separate program.

 

The Secondary RISE Special Education Team works directly with the Education Teams from Sullivan and Donohue Schools to ensure smooth transition from 8th to 9th grade for each learner. Similarly, the Team collaborates with the Post Secondary Transitional Program Team as well as outside services & organizations to ensure thoughtful, individualized Transition Planning occurs on behalf of every learner.

 

Supports & Services:

The RISE Program provides increased classroom Support Staff who assist RISE Special Educators in administering accommodations. RISE Special Educators collaborate and consult with District based itinerant service providers to ensure all curricula is accessible to any learner and that every learner with listed services has appropriate considerations and accommodations to ensure their greatest possible independence and success.

RISE serves learners in grades 9 -12, or until the age of 22.  The program is staffed according to Massachusetts laws regarding ratios for substantially separate programs with 12 learners to every 1 Special Educator and 2 Paraprofessionals. Reverse inclusion classes may include up to 8 general education learners and 12 special education learners with 1 Special Educator and 2 Paraprofessionals.

 

Assessments:

Curricular Accommodations, Enhancements and Modifications are organized in accordance with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. When deemed appropriate by the Learner’s assigned team, completion of the MCAS Alternative Assessments will occur during the 9th and 10th grade years *resulting in attainment of a Certificate of Completion in place of a Diploma upon program completion. When deemed appropriate by the Learner’s assigned team, academic training, direction and support around accessing and utilizing assigned accommodations  to  support efforts at successful completion of Standard MCAS up to age 22 will be provided. Successful completion of the MCAS standard test results in receipt of Diploma up to age 25.

Advisory, Inclusion, Social Supports, Essentials & Electives

Instructional periods at the Secondary level are conducted in accordance with site scheduling including specific advisory sessions.  Learners will receive additional Advisory courses with topics focusing in Social skills, Study skills and Workforce Readiness in their 9th through 11th grade years with opportunities for application in their senior year.  Learners for whom the site specific advisory lessons do not address their needs will participate in additional Social and Communication Skills lessons during advisory time. When appropriate, advisory lessons are conducted in an inclusive setting.  Peer supported Social Skills application opportunities are provided throughout the year. Direct Social Emotional Learning

 

and Essential Skills Training are embedded into CORE academic curriculum through content and program structure.

 

All RISE learners are encouraged to select elective classes such as Choir, Video Production, Various Art classes, Music, Physical Education, Microsoft Office, Adobe, Lit on Screen and more as well as participate in an inclusive breakfast and lunch setting. Alternative lunch environments can be arranged based on individual needs.

 

When deemed appropriate by the team, with guardian permission, learners in the RISE program are encouraged to work towards inclusion in core academic classes with support and access to their accommodations and consult provided to the general educator by the appropriate member of the RISE Special Education Team.

 

*Learners who receive a Certificate of Attendance will still walk with their 12th grade graduating class and participate in the ceremony, even if they will continue to attend the program afterwards.

 

Core Instruction: 

In English Language Arts (ELA), RISE aims to develop readers, writers, communicators, and thinkers who are prepared for the challenges and opportunities in the world today and in their futures. We strive to build on the skills and experiences of students in their elementary years so they emerge from our program performing at their optimal level. Our program provides students with rich literary experiences and increasing complex texts, appropriate to the individual. We provide instruction in writing for varied purposes and audiences, as well as training around accessing accommodations for successful writing in and out of the classroom. Our ELA programing reaches every learner at their level, providing functional language and communication training when appropriate. Our curriculum is informed by the Guiding Principles for English Language Arts and Literacy Programs as outlined in the 2011 Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for English Language Arts and Literacy:

 

  • Develops thinking and language through interactive learning
  • Uses literature to develop student understanding of their literary heritage
  • Draws on informational texts and multimedia to build academic vocabulary and content knowledge
  • Develops oral language and literacy
  • Emphasizes writing arguments, explanatory/informative texts, and narratives
  • Holds high expectations for all students
  • Provides explicit skill instruction in writing
  • Builds on the language, experiences, knowledge and interests of students
  • Nurtures students’ sense of their common ground and prepares them to participate responsibly in school and civic life
  • Reaches out to families and the community to sustain a literate society

 

Within mathematics, RISE aims to enable every learner to reach his or her math potential in a supportive, academically focused environment. In every mathematics course, we want learners to develop a variety of math expertise as outlined by the Standards for Mathematical Practice in the 2011 Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for Mathematics. These standards complement the content standards so that learners increasingly engage with the subject matter as they grow in mathematical maturity and expertise throughout their school years.

 

Through social studies, RISE aims to prepare our learners to be active, informed and optimally independent  participants in the community. We encourage each individual to reach for their greatest effectiveness in communication,  and act as; dynamic collaborators, confident decision makers, aware participants of American society, and engaged global citizens. Our rotation of courses* is designed to expose learners to both historical and current topics within Holyoke, the United States and around the world. RISE learners examine the many components of the City of Holyoke, the various Roles played out by public and private community members as well as their own individual roles. Our goals is to challenge our learners to speak effectively, think and act with purpose and to advocate for positive change through active participation in the democratic process. *These courses are taught in a 3 year rotation, allowing learners to take a General Education Elective during their academic coursework.

 

Grades 9-10 Grades 11-12
●     Essentials of ELA / Expressions of ELA

●     Fundamentals of Social and Study Skills & Explorations of US History / Applications of Social and Study Skills & Investigations of US History

●     Accessing Fundamentals of Algebra / Fundamentals of Geometry and Algebra

●     Living Organisms / Biological Systems

●     Applications of ELA / Interpretations of ELA

●     Survey of World History / Applications of Citizenship & The Citizens’ Guide to Holyoke

●     Mathematical Thinking and Problem Solving / Elements and Applications of Financial Literacy

●     Explorations of Human Science / Explorations of Ecology and Engineering

 

(4) Students with Health Impairments & Needs of Exception (SHINE) Program

Students in the substantially separate SHINE Program (medically fragile/low cognition) are cognitively assessed at the level of >2 years.  This is a specialized program for students who present with complex medical/developmental disabilities, highly complicated learning profiles, and educational needs that require a significant degree of program coordination and service.  The program activities are designed to access a wide variety of sensory responses through auditory, visual, tactile, proprioceptive, vestibular, and olfactory stimulation. The program intention is to enhance the development of fine and gross motor skills, encourage students to communicate at their own level, determine and build upon preferred sensory stimuli, and to offer opportunities for socializing with staff and peers.

 

The students in this program may require specific nursing and medical needs due to health issues including, but not limited to: G/J tubes, legal blindness, inability to independently ambulate, loss of speech abilities, brain damage, tracheotomies/respiratory issues, seizure disorders and other various medical disorders.  A student may not be on a Behavioral Intervention Program (BIP) for aggressive behaviors towards others due to the safety needs of this population.

 

These students may have one or more disabilities in any of the following areas: Communication Impairment, Developmental Disorder, Health Impairment, Neurological Impairment, Physical Impairment and/or Sensory Impairment.  Most students are in need of physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, vision therapy, assistive augmentative communication services, and/or music/art therapy on a daily to weekly basis to ensure they do not regress or demonstrate a loss in physical ability.  These students require moderate to maximum assistance for any and all personal care, feeding, academic work and communication.  They use voice-output devices for communication purposes and activation switches to operate various toys and appliances. Students in this program complete the MCAS-Alternate Assessment at the “access skill” level.

 

All students in this program require a 1:1 paraprofessional to fully access the curriculum, participate in activities and lessons, access the school environment, join in sensory input activities, feed, toilet/ complete personal care, communicate, activate AAC devices, ensure safety and comfort, and complete bus transfers.

 

 

Entrance Criteria:

To be considered for entry into the SHINE Program, the student must have

– a cognitive level of 0-2 years of age

– medical deficits/needs

– one or more disabilities/disorders in the field of communication, development,

health, neurological, physical, and/or sensory impairment

 

Students in the SHINE Program have one or more of the following disabilities (Definitions according to the Massachusetts Department of Education’s Website):

  • Autism:  A developmental disability significantly affecting verbal and nonverbal communication and social interaction. The term shall have the meaning given it in federal law at 34 CFR 300.7.

Federal Definition: (i) Autism means a developmental disability significantly affecting verbal and nonverbal communication and social interaction, generally evident before age 3, that adversely affects a child’s educational performance. Other characteristics often associated with autism are engagement in repetitive activities and stereotyped movements, resistance to environmental change or change in daily routines, and unusual responses to sensory experiences. The term does not apply if a child’s educational performance is adversely affected primarily because the child has an emotional disturbance, as defined in paragraph (b)(4) of this section.

 

  • Communication Impairment:  The capacity to use expressive and/or receptive language is significantly limited, impaired, or delayed and is exhibited by difficulties in one or more of the following areas: speech, such as articulation and/or voice; conveying, understanding, or using spoken, written, or symbolic language. The term may include a student with impaired articulation, stuttering, language impairment, or voice impairment if such impairment adversely affects the student’s educational performance

 

  • Developmental Delay:  The learning capacity of a young child (3-9 years old) is significantly limited, impaired, or delayed and is exhibited by difficulties in one or more of the following areas: receptive and/or expressive language; cognitive abilities; physical functioning; social, emotional, or adaptive functioning; and/or self-help skills.

 

  • Health Impairment:  A chronic or acute health problem such that the physiological capacity to function is significantly limited or impaired and results in one or more of the following: limited strength, vitality or alertness including a heightened alertness to environmental stimuli resulting in limited alertness with respect to the educational environment. The term shall include health impairments due to asthma, attention deficit disorder or attention deficit with hyperactivity disorder, diabetes, epilepsy, a heart condition, hemophilia, lead poisoning, leukemia, nephritis, rheumatic fever, and sickle cell anemia, if such health impairment adversely affects a student’s educational performance.
  • Intellectual Impairment:  The permanent capacity for performing cognitive tasks, functions, or problem solving is significantly limited or impaired and is exhibited by more than one of the following: a slower rate of learning; disorganized patterns of learning; difficulty with adaptive behavior; and/or difficulty understanding abstract concepts. Such term shall include students with mental retardation.
  • Neurological Impairment:  The capacity of the nervous system is limited or impaired with difficulties exhibited in one or more of the following areas: the use of memory, the control and use of cognitive functioning, sensory and motor skills, speech, language, organizational skills, information processing, affect, social skills, or basic life functions. The term includes students who have received a traumatic brain injury.

 

  • Physical Impairment:  The physical capacity to move, coordinate actions, or perform physical activities is significantly limited, impaired, or delayed and is exhibited by difficulties in one or more of the following areas: physical and motor tasks; independent movement; performing basic life functions. The term shall include severe orthopedic impairments or impairments caused by congenital anomaly, cerebral palsy, amputations, and fractures if such impairment adversely affects a student’s educational performance.

 

  • Sensory Impairment:  The term shall include the following:

 

  1. Hearing – The capacity to hear, with amplification, is limited, impaired, or absent and results in one or more of the following: reduced performance in hearing acuity tasks; difficulty with oral communication; and/or difficulty in understanding auditorily-presented information in the education environment. The term includes students who are deaf and students who are hard-of –hearing.
  2. Vision – The capacity to see, after correction, is limited, impaired, or absent and results in one or more of the following: reduced performance in visual acuity tasks; difficulty with written communication; and/or difficulty with understanding information presented visually in the education environment. The term includes students who are blind and students with limited vision.
  3. Deaf-Blind – Concomitant hearing and visual impairments, the combination of which causes severe communication and other developmental and educational needs.

Programs Used:

The following is a partial listing of the specialized programs used in the SHINE classroom.

  • Teacher Designed – Sensory-Integrated Program
  • Carolina Curriculum for Infants, Toddlers, & Students with Special Needs
  • Brigance Early Childhood Cognitive Screenings
  • Boardmaker
  • PODD
  • SMART Notebook

SUB-SEPARATE ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS COURSE SEQUENCE

 

Essentials of English Language Arts (2018-2019)

In this course learners work to access and improve their functional language skills. This highly individualized class is taught in a sheltered section and focuses on individual learners’ goals in Communication using their most effective method.  This class is conducted with the support of paraprofessionals under the direct supervision of a Special Education Instructor with ongoing access to speech language pathologist and board certified behavior analyst consult and push-in opportunities. The classroom welcomes General Education Seniors as Teaching Assistants to act as Behavioral and Speech Models.  While much of the instruction focuses on individual language acquisition and application, each session features an engaging group activity such as Name Tag, Video Model Imitation Dance/Yoga and Card or Board Games to encourage spontaneous language use. This fun learning lab has yielded significant results for past learners including doubling and tripling individual vocabularies and communicative attempts.  Essentials of English Language Arts and the Expressions of English Language Arts are offered alternately on an annual basis.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1175                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1176                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Expressions of English Language Arts** (2019-2020)

In this course learners will explore and refine their abilities to use various forms of expression that find their roots in the written language. With a focus on prose and poetry that  emphasizes Growth Mindset and Emotional Intelligence, this class implores learners to identify the elements of texts, such as the use of sensory language. This engaging class allows learners to work at their own pace to create a portfolio of work that is unique to their interests, support needs and skill level. This class is ideal for a learner working to complete their MCAS Alt portfolio as the curricular focuses are Reading Comprehension, Writing and Language. By the end of the school year, most  learners will be able to identify details within a text, decode unfamiliar words and phrases and write clear summaries, poems or narratives. Some learners will be moving on to analysis of texts.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1177                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1178                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Applications of English Language Arts** (2018-2019)

This  engaging, hands-on, project-based course brings literature to life in the classroom through collaborative creation of various media as learners work together to create their own interpretations of contemporary stories of Growth Mindset and Emotional Intelligence from Around the World. These stories of Hope, Growth Mindset and Emotional Intelligence include; The Cherry Tree &  Red: A Crayon’s Story, Harold and the Purple Crayon, The Smallest Girl in the Smallest Grade, Freckle Juice and more. This class allows learners to become fluent at identifying sequence, creating summaries, interpreting character motives and understanding meanings of words and phrases as well as recognizing how the structure, tone and content of a text impacts the message. Learners will move on to providing analysis and some may even begin to synthesize, compare and critically evaluate texts. This course is ideal for a

learner who is compiling an MCAS Portfolio or Alt or for a learner who is preparing for long-term success in the Standard MCAS tests.  Applications of English Language Arts and Interpretations of English Language Arts (beginning in 2019-2020) are offered alternately on an annual basis.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1179                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1180                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

**Computer Skills Coaching Embedded: Course includes instruction and support in accessing and acquiring skill sets in computer use. Learners will access assignments, materials, assessments and research through Google Docs, Gmail and various search engines such as Encyclopedia Britannica, using Chromebooks and other such school-based technology. Ongoing instruction on these skills will be provided along with support commiserate with student need. Students will be supported in accessing technology based accommodations such as Google Read Aloud or Speech to Text, when listed in learner IEP.

 

 

SHINE English Language Arts

In the context of a secondary level course, students may receive modified multi-sensory instruction, derived from and aligned with the Common Core Standard Framework and the MCAS-Alternate Assessment, including, but not limited to, the following topics: vocabulary acquisition, object identification, literature, augmentative communication, poetry, modified writing, literature on screen, structure, and literary elements.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1185                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1186                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

SUB-SEPARATE ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS – ELECTIVES

 

Elements of English Language Arts

This hands-on, tier 2 reading intervention supports learners as they develop and expand upon their reading skill set. With sections to support ELL learners as well as those with a need for reduced class size and modified curriculum, this course serves a range of learners. Using the prescribed methods of Wilson’s, Just Words, this course aims to build upon learner’s current understanding of phonics and decoding abilities.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1183                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1184                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUB-SEPARATE MATHEMATICS – COURSE SEQUENCE

 

Accessing Fundamentals of Algebra

This highly individualized course is offered to learners grade 9 to age 22, who need intensive supports around math skills including number identification, counting, sequencing, time telling, calendar skills and coin recognition.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1280                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1281                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Fundamentals of Geometry and Algebra

Learners enrolled in this class will have a focus on pre-algebra skills and enhanced geometry topics such as arithmetic, fractions, word problems, working with whole numbers and place value operations with whole numbers, number theory, fractions, ratio and proportion, decimals, and percents, probability and statistics, clock arithmetic, the metric system, relations and functions, geometry and transformations.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1282                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1283                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Accessing Mathematical Thinking and Problem Solving (2018-2019)

This course includes extensive review of basic math skills including number recognition and sequencing as well as differentiated instruction focused on time measuring, schedule and calendar skills. Access to school based technology provides learners the opportunity to use computer based programs to access; graphing, number systems, measurement, data, fractions, geometry, sorting, ratios, probability, statistics, and patterns at their own pace. Accessing Mathematical Thinking and Problem Solving and the Elements of Financial Literacy are offered alternately on an annual basis.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1284                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1285                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Elements of Financial Literacy (2019-2010)

This course is offered to learners grades 11 through age 22, which concentrates on functional math skills to increase learners’ independence within the community. Learners will continue to review basic math skills and concentrate on the ongoing development and application of financial literacy skills including counting coin and paper currency, making and computing change, tracking and calculating hourly wages,budgeting, banking and shopping skills. Learners enrolled in this class, may also work in conjunction with the Vocational Skills and Adaptive Daily Living class to sell, take inventory, weigh products and modify recipes to multiply or divide the yield of any given recipe.  Accessing Mathematical Thinking and Problem Solving and the Elements of Financial Literacy are offered alternately on an annual basis.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1286                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1287                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

SHINE Mathematics

In the context of a secondary level course, students may receive modified multi-sensory instruction, derived from and aligned with the Common Core Standard Framework and the MCAS-Alternate Assessment, including, but not limited to, the following topics: graphing, number systems, measurement and data, fractions, geometry, sorting, ratios, probability & statistics, and patterns.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1288                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1289                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

SUB-SEPARATE SCIENCE – COURSE SEQUENCE

Living Organisms and Biological Systems                                        

In this two-year modified course learners will access the fundamental element of Biology as they work to complete an MCAS Alt Portfolio over their 9th and 10th grade years. Coursework focuses on plant cells, animal cells and all systems of living organisms. Learners will also explore the human body systems, including the human reproductive system.  Living Organisms and Biological Systems are offered alternately on an annual basis.

 

Living Organisms (2018-2019)          

Semester 1:  Course #1380                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1381                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Biological Systems (2019-2020)

Semester 1:  Course #1382                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1383                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Explorations of Human Science (2018-2019)                                              

In this course students apply the learnings of Living Organisms and Biological Systems to family studies, food and nutrition, and consumer science.  Students will learn how individuals and families interact with each other andhow individuals grow or change with time, from birth through death.  In addition, students will explore basic food preparation, nutrition and consumer skills. This course is offered every other year, alternating with Explorations of Ecology & Engineering.  The course will be offered in 2018-2019.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1384                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1385                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Explorations of Ecology & Engineering (2019-2020)                    

In this two-semester survey course, students will acquire an “ecological literacy” about how the natural world works and apply “engineering” solutions to environmental problems.  In semester one, students develop and study the interactions between organisms and their environment. In the semester two, students will strengthen engineering / problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and

design to create solutions to various challenges.  Students will learn how to document their work, and communicate their solutions to their peers and members of the community.  This course is offered every other year, alternating with Explorations of Human Science.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1386                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1387                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

SHINE Science & Technology                                                              

In the context of a secondary level course, students may receive modified multi-sensory instruction, derived from and aligned with the Common Core Standard Framework and the MCAS-Alternate Assessment, including, but not limited to, the following topics: weather & temperature, space, the five senses, seasons, plants, animals, insects, habitats, magnets, sound, light, states and properties of matter, rocks-gems-minerals, life cycles & food chains, metamorphosis, engineering, electrical circuits, simple machines, chemistry, and recycling.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1388                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1389                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

SUB-SEPARATE SOCIAL STUDIES – COURSE SEQUENCE

 

Explorations of Social & Study Skills **

Taught prior to United States History, this reverse-inclusive course provides learners with the fundamental of Social Emotional Learning and Study Skills. Learners will explore the basics of Self Awareness, Self Regulation, Communication, Empathy and Motivation in addition to Goal Setting, Time Management, Conflict Resolution, Change Management, Decision Making and Stress Management. They will dig deeper into Self Awareness as they identify their personal behavioral triggers and Self Regulation as they identify effective strategies for redirecting and eventually changing their self-identified problem behaviors. Students work toward identifying obstacles and improving their goal setting and time management skills.

 

Semester:  Course #1901                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Explorations of  United States History** 

In this course learners explore American History from Colonial America to Reconstruction. Learners are exposed to enhanced (or modified, if needed) curriculum and dynamic direct instruction that is carefully supportive of each learner’s individual needs.  Learners access the curriculum through the use of graphic novels, role playing exercises and various interdisciplinary Project Based Learning opportunities. Learners are graded based on class participation, various content and vocabulary assessments,

performance on PBLs as assessed by instructor and project group members, do-now journal and various other differentiated materials based upon individual learner needs.  Explorations of United States History and Investigations into United States History are offered alternately on an annual basis.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Fundamentals of Social and Study Skills

Semester 1:  Course #1480                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Applications of Social & Study Skills **

Taught prior to United States History, this reverse-inclusive course provides learners with more in-depth understanding of Emotional Intelligence and Study Skills. Learners will practice appropriate Communication for a range of settings as well as exercise their ability to engage in group projects, including providing , receiving and applying feedback respectfully. They will work to harness Motivational tools for successful, SMART Goal Setting, effective Decision Making and Stress Management. Learners will receive instruction on how to advocate for and access appropriate accommodations for the classroom as well as daily living and fill their toolboxes with methods for school success as they learn effective study and test taking techniques as well as time management and conflict resolution tactics.

 

Semester:  Course #1902                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Investigations into United States History

In this course learners explore American History from Industrialization to Present. Learners are exposed to enhanced (or modified, if needed) curriculum and dynamic direct instruction that is carefully supportive of each learner’s individual needs.  Learners access the curriculum through the use of graphic novels, role playing exercises and various interdisciplinary Project Based Learning opportunities. Learners are graded based on class participation, various content and vocabulary assessments, performance on PBLs as assessed by instructor and project group members, do-now journal and various other differentiated materials based upon individual learner needs.  Explorations of United States History and Investigations into United States History are offered alternately on an annual basis.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Successful completion of Applications of Social and Study Skills

Semester:  Course #1481                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Survey of World History

World History provides an overview of the history of human society in the past few

centuries  from  the  Renaissance  period  to  the  contemporary period.  Topics covered include  exploring the political, economic, social, religious, military, scientific, and cultural developments.

Learners are exposed to enhanced (or modified, if needed) curriculum and dynamic direct instruction that is carefully supportive of each learner’s individual needs.  Learners access the curriculum through the use of graphic novels, role playing exercises and various interdisciplinary Project Based Learning opportunities. Learners are graded based on class participation, various content and vocabulary assessments, performance on PBLs as assessed by instructor and project group members, do-now journal and various other differentiated materials based upon individual learner needs.

 

Semester:  Course #1484                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester:  Course  #1485                  2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

Applications of Citizenship**

This course is an exploration of local, national and global citizenship through the lens of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Basic Human Needs. Learners will consider the very human elements that drive our interactions on a local, national and global level. They will also explore how limited knowledge of other cultures often limits our ability to make fully informed decisions or participate as a global citizen. By expanding their knowledge, understanding and acceptance of cultural differences students will begin to make new connections about how they can collectively improve our lives and environment, here in Holyoke and across the globe.

 

(Fall) Semester:  Course #1486         2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

The Citizen’s Guide to Holyoke**                                           

In this reverse-inclusive course focusing on local, national and global Citizenship, learners will familiarize themselves with everything from the landmarks and bus schedules to the elected officials and active concerns of the citizens of Holyoke. Students will become familiar with and interview various community members in critical roles including community helpers like fire and police personnel, former mayors and even our state representative. Students will hear first-person accounts of  historical community impact projects, such as the Merry Go Round Restoration, from the organizers themselves. Students will learn about their own civic responsibilities through hands-on experiences such as registering voters and participating / contributing in city council meetings and their Civic Duties by visiting the local Courthouse and participating in mock trials. They will get the chance to practice traveling around the city on the PVTA as well as by foot and will participate in letter writing campaigns and community improvement projects that directly addresses an issue of community concern that the class picks (by popular vote – of course!).

 

(Spring) Semester:  Course #1487     2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

SHINE Global & Social Studies                                                 

In the context of a secondary level course, students may receive modified multi-sensory instruction, derived from and aligned with the Common Core Standard Framework and the MCAS-Alternate Assessment, including, but not limited to, the following topics: physical geography, economics, community relations, calendar systems, holidays, culture & traditions, government & politics, natural resources, landmarks, demographics, historical figures, and citizenship.

 

Fall:       Course #1488                        2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Spring:  Course #1489                        2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUB-SEPARATE ACADEMIC READINESS – ELECTIVES

 

Academic / School Support

The Academic / School Support course is designed specifically for students in the TIP program who require  intense social emotional support in a small class setting who are working towards full inclusion in general elective courses.  Therapeutic check-in services are the foundation of this course.  An intentional environment of safety, calmness and attention assist in focusing on academics and/or debriefing the school day or home life.  [TIP students who are enrolled in general education electives can also come to the room to check in/do academic work from their general education elective or a different academic class in a small self-contained therapeutic intervention setting.]

 

PREREQUISITE:  Required service of the Individualized Education Plan

Semester:  Course #1900                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

SUB-SEPARATE ADAPTIVE DAILY LIVING SKILLS – COURSE OFFERINGS

 

RISE aims to develop independent living skills specific to each learner’s needs. Students will concentrate on home and kitchen safety, meal preparation, hygiene-based self care, nutrition, budgeting and meal planning, leadership roles, communication skills and community based skill sets such as shopping, public transportation use and establish and engage in a repertoire of personal interests and hobbies.

 

Activities of Daily Living

In this enhanced course, learners access elements of Self Care, Home Care and Vocational Training as they work to plan and prepare healthful meals in a clean, safe kitchen. Under the supervision of instructors and with the support of program staff, learners are encouraged to reach optimal independence in skills sets that will improve their ability to live as independently as possible as well as expand their long-term vocational outcomes. In collaboration with Vocational Training sections, learners will work to create products and maintain inventory of food-stuffs to be sold to staff for program-based fundraising. This is a critical part of RISE’s Financial Literacy training as learners explore the concepts of budgeting and return on investment.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1903                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1904                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

SHINE Cooking and Sensory Integration

In the context of a secondary level course, students will be exposed to sensory stimulating activities encompassing the five senses in order to strengthen deficit areas as well as to provide sensory pleasure through fun and engaging activities, including, but not limited to: water exploration, light and movement, tactile exploration, olfactory stimuli, music & sound exploration, cooking, and baking.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1905                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1906                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

SUB-SEPARATE – TECHNICAL COURSES

Essential Study Skills

Learners will continue to explore the basics of goal setting, time management, organizational skills and stress management. They will dig deeper into self awareness as they identify their personal behavioral patterns and  practice effective strategies for expanding and integrating new behaviors.  Study skills teachers students how to be organized, manage time, improve reading comprehension, lesten effectively, take notes as appropriate and communicate more effectively I nwritten and oral expression.

 

Semester:  Course #1907                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Essential Interpersonal Skills

This introductory technical course provides opportunities for students to deepen their study of interpersonal skills required for the work place and/or communities beyond the classroom.  Topics will include the basics of teamwork, collaboration, conflict resolution, self-representation, self awareness, problem-solving, creativity and resourcefulness.  Students will work to strengthen their positive work ethic and integrity for the classroom and work place.

 

Semester:  Course #1908                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Pre-Transitional & Community Skills

This course provides learners with the opportunity to explore and research career interests that are suited to their skill levels. Depending on the needs of the learners enrolled in the course, topics covered can include but are not limited to various on-site training opportunities such as clerical duties and library work, transportation training and working within the community. Learners will also work on social skills, communication skills and time management throughout the course of study. Under the supervision of instructors and with the support of program staff, learners are encouraged to reach optimal independence in skills sets that will improve their ability to live as independently as possible as well as expand their long-term vocational outcomes. In collaboration with Activities of Daily Living sections, learners will work to create products and maintain inventory of food-stuffs to be sold to staff for Program-based fundraising. This is a critical part of RISE’s Financial Literacy training as learners explore the concepts of budgeting and return on investment.

 

Semester:  Course #1910                   2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

Internship

Internship experiences provide junior and senior students with the opportunity to explore career interests while applying the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom to a workplace setting. This practical experience offers professional skill development that builds upon the essential skills needed for students to be an engaged and productive member of the community. Student interns will set individualized learning objectives, investigate an industry in which they are interning, develop and maintain a resume, and reflect on the experiences obtained within a business environment which will support the defining of their future career goals.  For more information see the criteria for the same course listed under Career and Technical Education.

Fall Semester:  Course #1606          2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Spring Semester:  Course #1607     2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Fall Semester:  Course #1608          5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight (double period)

Spring Semester: Course #1609      5.0 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight (double period)

Fall Semester: Course #1698           7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight (triple period)

Spring Semester:  Course #1699     7.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight (triple period)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WORLD LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT

The study of world languages expands a person’s perspectives and opportunities, and increases knowledge of one’s own language and culture.  World developments in political, social, and business spheres have the knowledge of another language a critical skill that is highly prized by employers.

Any language may be begun in any grade; however, since language development is a gradual and continual process, it is highly recommended that a student continue with the language chosen for the longest sequence possible.  Students with an aptitude and interest for languages are encouraged to begin a second language while continuing the first.  Students, particularly those planning a career involving foreign languages, are also encouraged to elect appropriate courses in the Social Studies Department to give them added insights into the history and culture of other countries.

The courses in modern languages (French and Spanish) seek to develop in students, basic communicative competence, a solid foundation for continued language development and an increased knowledge of the history, culture and literature of other countries. The option to elect either the standard program or the advanced program at upper levels permits students to continue with a chosen language at a pace commensurate with interest and ability.

The Latin program places students in close contact with a civilization that provides them with examples of patriotism, a love of justice, devotion to family, and a sense of duty and morality.  Serving as a link between the ancient and modern worlds, the study of Latin places much of man’s acquired knowledge at the student’s disposal.  In addition it helps to develop a base for excellence in English, a sound knowledge of language structure, and an appreciation of the best in literary effort.

 

FRENCH COURSE OFFERINGS

 

French I 

This course develops systematically and progressively the student’s ability in the four language skills: listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis is placed on proper pronunciation and international patterns, basic grammatical structure and vocabulary development. Cultural aspects of the French speaking world will be presented throughout the year. Communicative activities will be done as well as tape activities in the language lab.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1710                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1711                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

French II  

This course reviews and continues the development of fundamental skills, grammar structures and vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on strengthening reading and writing skills while further developing skills in listening comprehension and speaking. Increasing the student’s ability to express him or herself in French is also stressed. Discussions of French culture and life in French speaking countries are continually integrated into the course through readings, videos and music. The continued use of the native language topics will familiarize the student with the cadence of spoken French.

 

PREREQUISITE: Satisfactory completion of French I. A ‘C’ average or better is recommended.

Semester 1:  Course #1712                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1713                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

French III Honors

This course develops the student’s ability to read easily and comprehend directly using literary selections.  Emphasis is placed on increasing students’ control of vocabulary, idioms and basic grammatical structures.   Students’ listening and comprehension skills are enhanced through a variety of conversational exercises. French culture and traditions continue to be woven throughout the course through videos, readings, music and the like.

 

PREREQUISITE: Honors criteria. Completion of French II.

Semester 1:  Course #1714               2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1715                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

French lV Honors 

The objectives are the same for this course as for standard French IV, and, in addition, provide a quickly paced and intensive language experience involving additional content, material, and practice for students with high interest and/or ability in the language. This course contains all material of the standard French IV course plus: additional vocabulary development, additional readings including classic and contemporary literature, additional composition work, original and critical, additional aural/oral work, oral presentations by students, and more developed French history and culture.

 

PREREQUISITE: Honors criteria. Completion of French III Honors.

Semester 1:  Course #1716                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1717                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

LATIN COURSE OFFERINGS

 

Latin I

Latin 1 is a beginning language course designed as an introduction to the ancient Romans and their language. Emphasis is placed on acquiring the skills needed to read elementary Latin texts. The influence of Roman civilization on modern society is examined through a study of Roman mythology, culture, history and archaeology. In addition, students expand their English vocabularies through a study of Latin root words.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1720                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1721                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

Latin II  

In Latin 2, students review the basic language principles studied in Latin 1 and master language skills not studied previously. Emphasis is placed on acquiring the skills needed to read intermediate Latin texts. Further study of Roman civilization and culture through an examination of adapted readings in Latin, increases the students’ awareness of the debt of western civilization to ancient Greece and Rome. Students continue to develop their English vocabulary through a study of Latin roots.

 

PREREQUISITE: Satisfactory completion of Latin I.

Semester 1:  Course #1722                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1723                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Latin Prose Honors 

This course begins with a systematic review of the fundamentals of Latin grammar and syntax.  The readings are designed to cover a wide range of Roman prose writers. Selections from Caesar, Cicero and Pliny lead to a deeper understanding and broader perspective of Roman culture.  Students will read selections from Cicero’s orations and develop an understanding of Roman rhetoric and its influence in politics.   NOTE:  This course is offered in opposite years of Latin Poetry Honors.

 

PREREQUISITE:   Honors criteria.  Satisfactory completion of Latin II.

Semester 1:  Course #1724                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1725                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

Latin Poetry Honors

Students will read, analyze and discuss the poetry of Catullus, Horace and Vergil. The class will complete advanced study in the scansion and rhetorical devices of Latin poetry, as well as expand vocabulary and grammatical understanding. The course will also set the poems in the context of the historical and social events in Rome that inspired them as well as explore the Greek precedents for the genre of lyric and epic poetry. NOTE:  This course is offered in opposite years of Latin Prose Honors.

 

PREREQUISITE: Honors criteria.  Satisfactory completion of Latin II.

Semester 1:  Course #1726                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1727                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

 

 

SPANISH COURSE OFFERINGS

 

 

Spanish I  

This course is for students new to Spanish or who have taken middle school Spanish but are not yet ready for Spanish 2. This course acquaints students with the language and culture of the Spanish-speaking world, emphasizing effective oral and written skills, grammar, vocabulary and global awareness. Topics include geography, self, school, family, leisure activities, clothing, weather and shopping.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1730                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1731                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Spanish for Native Speakers I

This course is for students whose home language is Spanish.  This course focuses on the development of communicative competence in reading, writing, speaking and listening and viewing, as well as on understanding Hispanic cultures.  In addition to building vocabulary, learning basic rules and terminology of grammar, the course introduces the students to the geography and culture of the Spanish speaking world.  This course is conducted in Spanish. The goal of the course is to increase students’ biliteracy skills Spanish.

 

Semester 1:  Course #1740                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1741                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Spanish II 

This course reinforces the vocabulary, grammatical structures and cultural themes presented in Spanish I and develops more complex structures necessary for continuing communication, according to the state and national standards. This course includes a novel and interactive online resources to develop global and cultural themes. Additional topics include health, food, daily routines and communication in past, present and simple future time frames.

 

PREREQUISITE: Completion of Spanish I.  An average grade of “C” or better is recommended.

Semester 1:  Course #1732                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1733                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Spanish for Native Speakers II 

This course is for Spanish speakers who have completed Spanish for Native Speakers I. The course focuses on teaching language through literature. It exposes the students to works of literary significance and social, cultural and historical issues of the Spanish speaking world. The course continues to stress

 

 

 

reading, writing and appropriate language usage. This course prepares students for the AP Spanish Language and Culture course. This course is conducted in Spanish. The goal of the course is to secure students’ biliteracy skills in Spanish.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Spanish for Native Speakers I.

Semester 1:  Course #1742                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1743                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

Spanish III Honors

The purpose of Spanish III is: 1) to develop oral and written communication skills through past, future and conditional narratives 2) to develop cultural and global awareness, while attentive to international perspectives and 3) to reinforce reading and listening comprehension skills through online resources , short stories, film, poetry, music lyrics and print media. The class will be conducted almost entirely in Spanish. Students are expected to acquire detailed knowledge of all essential elements of language structure and grammar.

 

PREREQUISITE: Honors criteria.  Completion of Spanish II, Spanish for Native Speakers I, or Spanish for Native Speakers II.

Semester 1:  Course #1734                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1735                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – honors GPA weight

 

 

Advanced Placement (AP) Spanish Language and Culture     

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course emphasizes communication (understanding and being understood by others) by applying the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication in real-life situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course strives not to overemphasize grammatical accuracy at the expense of communication. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, the course is taught almost exclusively in Spanish.

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of cultural products (e.g., tools, books, music, laws, conventions, institutions); practices (patterns of social interactions within a culture); and perspectives (values, attitudes, and assumptions).  An AP examination will be required for all students.

 

A student may enroll in this course and not take the Advanced Placement examination.  In this case, he/she/they will earn credit and weighted gradepoint average for the course at the honors level.

 

PREREQUISITE: AP criteria.  Completion of Spanish for Native Speakers II or Spanish III Honors.

Semester 1:  Course #1744                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1745                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

 

 

DUAL ENROLLMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Students at Holyoke Public Schools are encouraged to access college level work while in high school through dual enrollment and early college programs.  All students are eligible for dual enrollment.  Participation in dual enrollment courses requires admissions by a college or university.  HPS partners for 2018-2019 include:

 

  • Holyoke Community College (HCC)
  • Springfield Technical Community College (STCC)
  • UMASS – Amherst
  • Westfield State University

 

Note:  If you wish to take a class at a different college or university, you must apply directly with that college or university.

 

Dual Enrollment classes are college classes that high school students can take in lieu of a high school course requirement. Students get both high school and college credit for these courses. Taking a Dual Enrollment class is a great way to get a taste of what college classes are like. Students who take these classes are often more prepared to take on what college has to offer.

Who is eligible to take Dual Enrollment classes?

  • Students must be juniors or seniors in high school
  • Students must meet any other requirements of the college in which they plan to enroll.
  • Most colleges require a minimum grade point average:
    • Holyoke Community College (HCC): Minimum 2.5 GPA*
    • Springfield Technical Community College: Minimum 2.0 GPA
    • UMASS Amherst: 3.2 GPA for courses taken at UMASS; NO minimum GPA for UMASS classes offered at HHS
  • Westfield State University: 2.5 GPA*

*These colleges may admit students who have between a 2.0 and a 2.5 GPA if the student is recommended by the guidance counselor.

Application Information:

  • Deadlines vary by college and you should check with the college or your guidance counselor to have exact deadlines.
  • Application deadlines for fall semester is usually in late June
  • Application for spring semester is usually in early December
  • Application for summer term is usually in early May
  • Applications for HCC and STCC can be found on their websites (see below). The guidance office has applications for other colleges. Applications require the signature of the parent/guardian and the guidance counselor. An official transcript must be sent with the application.
  • Apply early to guarantee your spot!

 

Financial Costs:

  • Most dual enrollment classes are FREE to you! The colleges have funding that covers the cost of your class!*
  • HCC asks that all students fill out a financial aid application called the FAFSA (fafsa.ed.gov) in order to guarantee their spot in the class.
  • Dual Enrollment students are responsible for purchasing the books for their class unless otherwise instructed. Exceptions:
    • HCC Dual Enrollment students who complete a FAFSA may receive a voucher to pay for their book
    • Books may be covered by HHS or by the college if the class is offered at Holyoke High.
    • If buying a book is an obstacle for you, speak with the college that you are taking a class with. They will work with students to help as much as possible.

*UMASS Amherst typically charges $20 per class

 

 Transportation

  • Transportation to and from the college is the responsibility of the student. HCC and STCC will provide Dual Enrollment students with bus passes if needed.

 

Scheduling

Students who take a Dual Enrollment class may have their HHS schedule adjusted if this is possible. It is essential that the student speak with their guidance counselor as soon as he or she applies for a Dual Enrollment class in order to understand how the HHS schedule must be adjusted.  Often an additional period is required for transportation time.

 

More information:

HCC Dual Enrollment programs:  http://www.hcc.edu/admission/dual-enrollment

STCC Dual Enrollment programs:  http://www.stcc.edu/collegenow/

UMASS Amherst – See your guidance counselor

Westfield State University – See your guidance counselor

 

 

 

 

 

EARLY COLLEGE PROGRAMS

Early college programs provide a pathway to high school graduation that includes the completion of at least 12 credit hours (or four courses) of dual enrollment at a college or university partner.  HPS early college programs launch at Holyoke High School with cohort courses taught by college professors with wrap-around supports provided by HPS staff.  With demonstrated success and academic readiness, students are then supported in the transition to coursework at the college campus.

 

Holyoke Public Schools has received initial designation from the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to provide two early programs:  (1) HPS-HCC Early College and (2) Westfield Promise.  (Final designation pathway applications will be reviewed in Spring 2018.)

 

HPS-Holyoke Community College (HCC) Early College

The HPS- HCC early college partnership is a three-year program.  Up to 100 students are admitted by blind lottery to the program upon successful completion of Freshman Academy coursework.  Early college programming begins in grade 10. Students enroll in a college acceleration and a career / technical based exploration class in the sophomore year (aligned to an academy) and then take core classes their junior and senior years at HCC.  Articulation efforts for Algebra II to MTH 095 and English III to ENG 095 ensure students access to non-remedial coursework.  Students earn a minimum of 12 college credits during high school that are transferable to state colleges and universities.

 

 

EARLY COLLEGE REQUIRED ELECTIVE

 

College Readiness Acceleration

This course is required for all participants in the Early College Program at grade 10.  College Readiness Acceleration is designed to solidify the study, critical thinking and organizational skills required for success in dual enrollment courses and college.  Academic acceleration is provided on an individual basis in response to the Accuplacer Diagnostics in four areas:  reading comprehension, sentence skills, arithmetic and elementary algebra.  The goal of the course activities is make college attainable without the need for remediation.  It is based on the integration of the College Board’s AVID Elective course and the Accuplacer: MyFoundationsLab.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Acceptance to the HPS-HCC Early College Pathway

Semester 1:  Course #1920                2.5 credits – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #1921                1.0 credit – 20 weeks – college prep GPA weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HCC COURSES OFFERED AT HOLYOKE HIGH SCHOOL

in the spring semester 2018-2019

NOTE:  Descriptions are from the Holyoke Community College Course Catalog

 

HCC COM 150:  Public Speaking (3 credits)           

COM 150 introduces students to the necessary elements of informative and persuasive public speaking. The course includes performance analysis of speakers and major historical speeches. Course skills learned are useful in all forms of oral presentation in professional and academic settings. Students are required to attend one outside speaking performance, to deliver several speeches in class, and to participate in group discussion. Please note that this course replaces SPE 120 Fundamentals of Speech. Students will not receive credit for both SPE 120 and COM 150.

 

PREREQUISITE:  C or better in College Readiness Acceleration

Dual Credit at HHS as English Elective   5.0 credits – 40 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

HCC CRJ 100:  Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 credits)                    

Historical and philosophical background and critical evaluation of the criminal justice system.  A study of the United States Constitution and its impact on modern criminal justice.  The relationship of crime to the police, prosecution, the courts, probation, parole, corrections, and the general functions of each.  Exploration of the field of criminal justice and professional career opportunities in it. PREREQUISITE: English 095 eligibility

 

PREREQUISITE:  C or better in College Readiness Acceleration

Dual Credit at HHS as Social Studies Elective – 5.0 credits – 40 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

HCC EDU 100:  Education in America (3 credits)                          

An introduction to the field of education designed to stimulate intelligent, critical, and reflective analysis of the nature and value of teaching and learning.  Historical, philosophical, social and political issues as well as current standards and trends in education are reviewed.  National and global issues as they impact education will be explored.  Emphasis is placed on the discovery of personal values, attitudes and attributes that contribute to the development of professional behavior and disposition.  Teacher requirements as well as related career paths are explored.  FS:  10 hour field study required.

 

PREREQUISITE:  C or better in College Readiness Acceleration

Dual Credit at HHS as Social Studies Elective – 5.0 credits – 40 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

HCC EGR 110:  Introduction to Robotics (4 credits)                     

Explore the multidisciplinary world of robotics, and its relevance to current humanitarian, social, and environmental concerns. Modeling the fields of science and engineering, this class will be based on teamwork and cooperative problem solving in a supportive, hands on, laboratory environment. Solutions to a series of challenges will be designed, constructed, tested and revised by students working together in groups. A standard, modular, mobile robotics system will be used to design and construct robots capable of carrying out a single task or multiple tasks related to a variety of applications. The role of science, engineering and technology in modern society will also be explored. (Same as SEM 110.)

 

PREREQUISITE:  C or better in College Readiness Acceleration

Dual Credit at HHS as Science Elective – 5.0 credits – 40 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

HCC HTH 101:  Introduction to Health Careers (3 credits)          

This course is for students who are exploring health careers and majors.  Students will have the opportunity to evaluate and reflect on their own skills, interests and values to determine how they might shape their educational and career paths.  The course will help clarify student understanding of specific careers in the field of health.  The course will also provide a basic introduction of the U.S. Healthcare system, including opportunities and challenges in this system.  The objective of this course is to help students decide if a career in the health field is a good fit for them and learn the educational requirements of specific health career degrees.

 

PREREQUISITE:  C or better in College Readiness Acceleration

Dual Credit at HHS as Science Elective        5.0 credits – 40 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

 

 

 

Westfield Promise (Early College)

The Westfield Promise is a two-year early college program.   Students are admitted (based on GPA and interest) at the junior year.  Junior students enroll in summer orientation and two “stretch” on-campus (HPS) cohort courses:  English 101 taught during HPS English III and History 0114 Modern World History taught during HPS World History.  Upon completion of these courses, students enroll and attend their senior year in at least 2 classes at Westfield State University.  All students will have the opportunity to obtain no fewer than 19 and up to 36 college credits while still enrolled in high school.  Westfield University, the district, and students/ families share the cost of the fees and materials.

 

WESTFIELD STATE PROMISE “STRETCH” CLASSES OFFERED AT HPS IN 2018-2019

NOTE:  Descriptions are from the Westfield State University Course Catalog

 

ENGL 0101 – English Composition I  (3 credits)

A writing course that provides instruction in the process of composing academic essays.  Students strengthen techniques in three stages – pre-writing, drafting, and revising – in order to complete well=structured papers written in proficient American English.  While responding to the first year read and other texts, students learn and practice the fundamentals of rhetoric, ways to incorporate texts into their writing, critical reading of texts, and sentence and paragraph development.  In addition to writing informally throughout the semester, writers compose at least 16 pages of formal writing and produce a final portfolio that includes at least one major assignment focused on the first-year read.  All students must take this course the first semester of their freshman year.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Westfield Promise Participant

Dual Enrollment in and Credit for Argument and Rhetoric:  English III

Semester 1:  Course #11320              2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course #11330              2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

HIST 0114 Modern World History (3 credits)

Survey of global history from hemispheric unification in the 16th century to the turn of the millennium.  Examines political, cultural, religious, and scientific developments as well as imperialism, colonialism, revolutions, and the ideological, economic, and technological foundations of the modern world.

 

PREREQUISITE:  Westfield Promise Participant

Dual Enrollment in and Credit for World History

Semester 1:  Course # 1434               2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

Semester 2:  Course # 1435               2.5 credits – 20 weeks – AP GPA weight

 

 

HHS COURSES IN DEVELOPMENT

Launch in 2019-2020 Launch in 2020-2021
Arts ·         Drama II
English ·         Public Speaking

·         Journalism Studio

·         Video Journalism Studio

Mathematics

and Computer Science

·         Computer Science Essentials ·         Computer Science Principles
Physical Education

and Wellness

·         Lifeguarding

·         Physical Education with a Lens for Law and Criminal Justice

Science ·         Integrated Field Science

·         Introduction to Engineering Design

·         Sustainability

·         Microbiology

·         Biotechnology

·         Principles of Engineering

 

Social Studies ·         Law and Criminal Justice 1

·         Ethnic Studies Leadership Program 2

·         Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics

·         Advanced Placement Comparative Government and Politics

·         Ethics

·         Law and Criminal Justice 2

·         Art History

 

Special Education ·         Interpretations of ELA
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